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Vaccinating Schoolchildren:<br>Next Step Forward in the Battle Against Influenza?

Vaccinating Schoolchildren:
Next Step Forward in the Battle Against Influenza?

Format

Clinical Review

Time to Complete

1 Hour

Released

October 1, 2009

Expires

October 31, 2010

Program Description

Each year, influenza epidemics cause 3 to 5 million cases of severe illness and between 250,000 and 500,000 deaths worldwide. While the very youngest and very oldest individuals are the most vulnerable to influenza and its potentially life-threatening complications, the highest attack rates occur among school-aged children and adolescents, who then serve as key vectors of disease transmission to other populations. Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent influenza-related morbidity and mortality. A growing body of research and clinical experience indicates that vaccinating children and adolescents of school age has a protective effect, within that age-group itself and throughout the population at large, and thus may be a more effective strategy than the traditional approach of vaccinating selected groups at high risk for influenza and its complications.

Educational Objectives

At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:
  • Describe the worldwide morbidity and mortality associated with influenza, identifying groups with highest attack rates and groups with highest incidence of complications, hospitalization, and death
  • Summarize recent changes in official recommendations for annual influenza immunization of children and adolescents
  • Evaluate and critique the rationale for universal pediatric immunization against influenza, including scientific findings on the herd immunity effect of immunizing the pediatric population against influenza
  • Compare safety and efficacy data for the live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) and the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in the pediatric population
  • Provide appropriate responses to typical myths and misunderstandings about influenza and influenza vaccination
  • Implement effective strategies for improving influenza immunization rates in the pediatric population, both in office- and clinic-based practice and in broader-based, population-wide immunization efforts

Disclosure

Boston University School of Medicine asks all individuals involved in the development and presentation of continuing medical education (CME) activities to disclose all relationships with commercial interests. This information is disclosed to CME activity participants. Boston University School of Medicine has procedures to resolve any apparent conflicts of interest. In addition, faculty members are asked to disclose when any unapproved use of pharmaceuticals and/or devices is being discussed.

Stephen I. Pelton, MD, has been a consultant for sanofi-aventis and a member of the speakers’ bureaus for sanofi-aventis and MedImmune.
Terho J. Heikkinen, MD, PhD, has been a consultant for MedImmune, Novartis, and GlaxoSmithKline.
Robert B. Belshe, MD, has been a consultant for MedImmune and Novartis, and a member of the speakers’ bureaus for MedImmune and GlaxoSmithKline.
Asher Barzilai, MD, EMBA, has nothing to disclose.
Rosemary Moleski, MD, Boston University School of Medicine, has nothing to disclose.
Lara Zisblatt, Boston University School of Medicine, has nothing to disclose.
Lynne Callea, Haymarket Medical Education, has nothing to disclose.
Marilyn Stearns, MD, Haymarket Medical Education, has nothing to disclose.

DISCLOSURE OF OFF-LABEL USE
Unlabeled/investigational uses of commercial products are discussed in this monograph.

DISCLAIMER
THESE MATERIALS AND ALL OTHER MATERIALS PROVIDED IN CONJUNCTION WITH CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES ARE INTENDED SOLELY FOR PURPOSES OF SUPPLEMENTING CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR QUALIFIED HEALTH-CARE PROFESSIONALS. ANYONE USING THE MATERIALS ASSUMES FULL RESPONSIBILITY AND ALL RISK FOR THEIR APPROPRIATE USE. TRUSTEES OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY MAKES NO WARRANTIES OR REPRESENTATIONS WHATSOEVER REGARDING THE ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, CURRENTNESS, NONINFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OF THE MATERIALS. IN NO EVENT WILL TRUSTEES OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY BE LIABLE TO ANYONE FOR ANY DECISION MADE OR ACTION TAKEN IN RELIANCE ON THE MATERIALS. IN NO EVENT SHOULD THE INFORMATION IN THE MATERIALS BE USED AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL CARE.

This program is sponsored by Boston University School of Medicine.

This program is supported by an educational grant from MedImmune.

If you wish to contact Boston University School of Medicine, please email cme@bu.edu, or visit the website, http://www.bu.edu/cme. To view the privacy policy of Boston University School of Medicine, please visit http://www.bu.edu/cme/policies/privacy_policy.html

Faculty

CME Course Director and Moderator
Stephen I. Pelton, MD
Professor of Pediatrics
Boston University School of Medicine
Chief, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Boston Medical Center
Boston, MA

Faculty
Terho J. Heikkinen, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
University of Turku
Consultant in Pediatrics
Turku University Hospital
Turku, Finland

Robert B. Belshe, MD
Dianna and J Joseph Adorjan Endowed
Professor of Infectious Diseases
and Immunology
Saint Louis University School of Medicine
Edward Doisy Research Center
St Louis, MO

Prof. Asher Barzilai, MD, EMBA
Head, Pediatric Infectious Disease Unit
Head, Laboratory Wing
The Edmond and Lily Safra Children’s Hospital
Sheba Medical Center
Tel Hashomer, Israel

Credit

1.00

Type

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM

Accreditation Statement

Boston University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement

Boston University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Instructions

To obtain credit, a score of 70% or better is required. This CME is offered at no cost to participants. Please proceed with the activity until you have successfully completed this program, answered all test questions, completed the posttest survey, and have received your digital copy of your credit certificate. Your online certificate will be saved on myCME.com within your Profile/Exam History, which you can then access at any time.

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

Hardware and Software Requirements
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  • Internet Browser: Internet Explorer 7.x or higher, Firefox 4.x or higher, Safari 2.x or higher, or any other W3C standards compliant browser
  • Additional Software: Adobe Flash Player and/or an HTML 5 capable browser maybe required for video or audio playback. PowerPoint or Adobe Acrobat Reader may occasionally be required
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