Self-Reported Function IDs Post-Op Course in Elderly

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Self-Reported Function IDs Post-Op Course in Elderly
Self-Reported Function IDs Post-Op Course in Elderly

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported function is more informative than frailty phenotype in predicting a negative postoperative course in older adults, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Alok Kapoor, M.D., from the School of Medicine at the University of Massachusetts in Worcester, and colleagues compared the performance of the American College of Surgeons Surgical Risk Calculator (ACS Calculator) for predicting risk of serious postoperative complications plus the addition of self-reported physical function versus a frailty score among 403 individuals aged 65 and older undergoing any surgery with a risk of serious complication of ≥5 percent.

The researchers found that over 30 days, 26 percent of participants developed an adverse postoperative course. With the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI FUNCTION) the increase in c-statistic for the ACS Calculator was slightly greater (0.076) than with the frailty phenotype (0.058). Net reclassification improvement was also better with LLFDI-FUNCTION.

"Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and validate the use of the LLFDI-FUNCTION with the ACS Calculator for preoperative assessments of older adults," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

Phone-Based Intervention Aids Rheumatoid Arthritis Care

Phone-Based Intervention Aids Rheumatoid Arthritis Care

Educational phone calls with nurses promote shared decision making in care

Early PT Linked to Less Opioid Use in Musculoskeletal Pain

Early PT Linked to Less Opioid Use in ...

For opioid-naive patients, early physical therapy tied to less opioid use in shoulder, neck, knee, back pain

Emotional Stress of Holidays Can Trigger Heart Attacks

Emotional Stress of Holidays Can Trigger Heart Attacks

Higher risk seen on Christmas Eve, particularly in older adults with diabetes, heart disease

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »