Risk Up for Later-Born Siblings of Children With ASD, ADHD

Share this content:
Risk Up for Later-Born Siblings of Children With ASD, ADHD
Risk Up for Later-Born Siblings of Children With ASD, ADHD

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Later-born siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have an elevated risk of being diagnosed with the same or the other disorder, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Meghan Miller, Ph.D., from the University of California Davis in Sacramento, and colleagues used data extracted from medical records of two large health care systems to estimate recurrence risk and cross-aggregation in later-born siblings of children with ADHD or ASD. Data were included for 15,175 later-born siblings of children with ADHD (730 children), ASD (158 children), and no known diagnosis (14,287 children).

The researchers found that later-born siblings of children with ASD were more likely to be diagnosed with ASD or ADHD in the absence of ASD compared with later-born siblings of children without ADHD or ASD (odds ratios, 30.38 and 3.7, respectively). Later-born siblings of children with ADHD were more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD or ASD in the absence of ADHD compared with later-born siblings of children without a diagnosis (odds ratios, 13.05 and 4.35, respectively).

"Practitioners may wish to share such information with families given the potential relevance of monitoring social communication, attention, and behavioral regulation skills in later-born skills of children with ASD or ADHD," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

FDA: Gout Drug Uloric Increases Risk of Death

FDA: Gout Drug Uloric Increases Risk of Death

Medication is associated with increased risk of heart-related death and death from all causes

Since Early 2000s, Overdose Death Rates Are Highest in U.S.

Since Early 2000s, Overdose Death Rates Are Highest ...

U.S. was not an outlier in terms of drug overdose mortality prior to the early 2000s

National Health Spending Set to Increase 5.5 Percent Annually

National Health Spending Set to Increase 5.5 Percent ...

Long-observed demographic and economic factors expected to drive growth in health spending

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »