Research Suggests HIV May Be Evolving Favorably

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Research Suggests HIV May Be Evolving Favorably
Research Suggests HIV May Be Evolving Favorably

(HealthDay News) -- New research in Africa suggests that the AIDS virus is getting smarter about evading the immune system while evolving into a less contagious and less lethal infection overall. The study was published online Dec. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The researchers focused on the evolution of the virus in two countries severely hit by AIDS -- Botswana, where the disease infected people earlier and more widely, and South Africa.

In Botswana, the researchers found, the virus has become more adept at bypassing the immune systems of people infected by it. However, this "appears to be beneficial in that there is a cost to HIV from this process of adaptation," study coauthor Philip Goulder, M.D., Ph.D., a research immunologist with the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, told HealthDay. "The cost is that HIV replicates less efficiently than before." In addition, the researchers suggest that powerful anti-HIV drugs are also pushing the virus to become less virulent.

In the country of Botswana, at least, "anyone who is newly infected now with HIV is less likely to suffer disease than if they had been infected 20 or 30 years ago," said Goulder. "If this process continues, HIV will cause less and less disease."

Abstract
Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

Cognitive Disability Most Prevalent Type in Young Adults

Cognitive Disability Most Prevalent Type in Young Adults

Disability-specific disparities prevalent in access to health care, especially for young, middle-aged adults

Declines in Life Expectancy in Many High-Income Countries

Declines in Life Expectancy in Many High-Income Countries

And increase in midlife death rates across racial and ethnic groups in the United States

Tobacco Content Still Common on U.K. Prime-Time Television

Tobacco Content Still Common on U.K. Prime-Time Television

Tobacco content occurred in 33 percent of all programs; 8 percent of all adverts, trailer breaks

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »