Ranolazine Bests Old School Antianginal Medications

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Ranolazine Bests Old School Antianginal Medications
Ranolazine Bests Old School Antianginal Medications

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Newer antianginal (AA) medications such as ranolazine show substantial outcome improvements in chronic stable angina pectoris (CSA) compared to traditional medications, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Robert L. Page II, Pharm.D., M.S.P.H., from the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy in Aurora, and colleagues analyzed a commercial claims database (2008 to 2012) to identify patients with CSA receiving a β-blocker (BB), calcium channel blocker (CCB), long-acting nitrate (LAN), or ranolazine (2,002 patients in each matched group). Patients were followed for 12 months after a change in AA therapy. A subset of 3,724 patients with diabetes were identified (BB, 933 patients; CCB, 940; LAN, 937; and ranolazine, 914).

The researchers found that in the overall cohort, traditional AA medication exhibited greater odds for revascularization and higher rates in all-cause outpatient visits, emergency room visits, inpatient length of stay, and cardiovascular-related emergency room visits, compared to ranolazine. In the diabetes mellitus cohort, ranolazine exhibited similar benefits over traditional AA medication.

"In conclusion, ranolazine use in patients with inadequately controlled chronic angina is associated with less revascularization and all-cause and cardiovascular-related health care utilization compared to traditional AA medication," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to Gilead Sciences, which funded the study.

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