Quality of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Varies Among Hospitals

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Quality of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Varies Among Hospitals
Quality of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Varies Among Hospitals

FRIDAY, Feb. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital process composite performance measures of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) care vary between U.S. hospitals and are associated with outcome, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in JAMA Cardiology.

Monique L. Anderson, M.D., from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and colleagues examined hospital-level variation to determine whether hospital process composite performance measures of IHCA care quality correlate with patient outcomes. Data from the Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation program were analyzed for 35,283 patients with IHCA from 261 U.S. Hospitals. The hospital process composite performance score for IHCA was calculated using five guideline-recommended process measures.

The researchers found that the median IHCA hospital process composite performance was 89.7 percent, with variation from 82.6 to 94.8 percent among hospital quartiles. There was a linear correlation for IHCA hospital process composite performance with risk-standardized hospital survival to discharge rates: 21.1, 21.4, 22.8, and 23.4 percent, respectively, from the lowest to highest performance quartiles (P < 0.001). Each 10 percent increase in a hospital's process composite performance correlated with increased odds of survival after adjustment (adjusted odds ratio, 1.22; P = 0.01). There was also a correlation seen for hospital process composite quality performance with favorable neurologic status at discharge (P = 0.004).

"The quality of guideline-based care for IHCA varies significantly among U.S. hospitals and is associated with patient survival and neurologic outcomes," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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