Prevalence of Adult E-Cigarette Use Up from 2014 to 2016

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Prevalence of Adult E-Cigarette Use Up from 2014 to 2016
Prevalence of Adult E-Cigarette Use Up from 2014 to 2016

TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) ever use increased among U.S. adults from 2014 to 2016, according to a research letter published in the May 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Wei Bao, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Iowa College of Public Health in Iowa City, and colleagues estimated the prevalence of ever and current e-cigarette use in 2014, 2015, and 2016. Data were analyzed for 101,175 National Health Interview Survey 2014 to 2016 participants aged 18 years or older.

The researchers observed a significant increase in the prevalence of ever use of e-cigarettes from 2014 to 2016 (12.6 percent in 2014, 13.9 percent in 2015, and 15.3 percent in 2016; P for trend < 0.001). A significant increase was seen in almost all subgroups. From 2014 to 2016 there was a decrease in the weighted prevalence of current e-cigarette use (3.7 percent in 2014, 3.5 percent in 2015, and 3.2 percent in 2016; P for trend = 0.02). For individuals aged 65 years or older, women, non-Hispanic whites, low-income participants, and current cigarette smokers, the decrease was significant. Among former smokers and never smokers, the prevalence increased significantly.

"In this study, current use of e-cigarettes declined among current smokers but increased among former smokers," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

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