Personal Life Choices Still Differ for Male, Female Cardiologists

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Personal Life Choices Still Differ for Male, Female Cardiologists
Personal Life Choices Still Differ for Male, Female Cardiologists

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For cardiologists, personal life choices still differ for men and women, although men are now more likely to indicate that their family responsibilities have a negative impact on career, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Sandra J. Lewis, M.D., from Northwest Cardiovascular Institute in Portland, Ore., and colleagues evaluated the results from the American College of Cardiology third decennial Professional Life Survey, which was completed by 2,313 cardiologists (42 percent women and 58 percent men).

The researchers found that the current results reflected a considerably lower response rate compared with 10 and 20 years ago (21 versus 31 and 49 percent, respectively) and a workforce that was aging and less likely to be in private practice. Women were still more likely to practice in academic centers, to have a noninvasive specialty, and to be pediatric cardiologists. Compared with previously, men were more likely to indicate that their family responsibilities had a negative influence on their careers, while women remained less inclined to marry or have children. Similar, high levels of career satisfaction were reported by men and women. Two-thirds of women reported experiencing discrimination, with a rate nearly three-fold higher than that reported by men.

"Personal life choices continue to differ substantially for men and women in cardiology, although differences have diminished," the authors write.

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