Patient Experience Officers Can Play Key Role in Medical Offices

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Patient Experience Officers Can Play Key Role in Medical Offices
Patient Experience Officers Can Play Key Role in Medical Offices

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A patient experience officer is an increasingly important new role in physician practices, according to an article recently published in Physicians Practice.

This new role involves a designated employee responsible for making sure the entire experience is in line with patients' expectations, including the experience they have from scheduling the appointment to interactions with the staff during the appointment, as well as the communication from the practice afterwards.

The position entails evaluating patient experience, collaborating with other staff to make improvements or changes to patient experience, establishing a patient communication plan (e.g., reminders, education, etc.), addressing patient feedback from surveys and reviews, managing the online experience with patients, and reporting on feedback and the effectiveness of programs to improve patient experience.

"Focusing on the patient experience can produce great results for a health care practice," according to the article. "Improving the experience in an office increases the loyalty patients feel toward the practice, and in turn increases the bottom line."

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