Oral High-Risk HPV Prevalence Appears to Be Low in England

Share this content:
Oral High-Risk HPV Prevalence Appears to Be Low in England
Oral High-Risk HPV Prevalence Appears to Be Low in England

THURSDAY, Aug. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of oral high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in adult men and women is low in England, according to a study published online Aug. 20 in BMJ Open.

Vanessa Hearnden, Ph.D., from the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, and colleagues assessed the prevalence of oral HR-HPV and associated risk factors for infection among 680 participants (aged 18 to 60 years; between April 2013 to August 2014).

The researchers found that the prevalence of oral HR-HPV infection was 2.2 percent, with 0.7 percent positive for HPV16 or HPV18. Oral HR-HPV infections were more likely in participants who were former smokers and had a greater number of sexual and oral sexual partners. Likelihood of HPV infection was not linked to folate status.

"To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the prevalence of oral HR-HPV infection in adult men and women in England," the authors write. "The prevalence is low and the data suggest that oral infection with HR types is associated with tobacco use and sexual behavior."

Abstract/Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

'Aggressive Steps' Needed to Stop Adolescent Use of E-Cigarettes

'Aggressive Steps' Needed to Stop Adolescent Use of ...

U.S. Surgeon General issues a call to action for parents, teachers, and health professionals

Exercise Linked to Reduced Mortality for Patients With Cancer

Exercise Linked to Reduced Mortality for Patients With ...

Mortality rate lower for habitually active patients and for those who started exercising after diagnosis

Hospitalizations Up for Homeless From 2007 to 2013

Hospitalizations Up for Homeless From 2007 to 2013

Homeless individuals hospitalized more often for mental illness, substance use disorder

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »