November 2014 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for November 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Health Care Organizations See Value of Telemedicine

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Health care organizations are developing and implementing telemedicine programs, although many have yet to receive reimbursement, according to a report published by Foley & Lardner.

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Brain Abnormality Spotted in Many SIDS Babies

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A brain abnormality may be responsible for more than 40 percent of deaths from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published online Nov. 24 in Acta Neuropathologica.

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PCV13 Recommended for 6- to 18-Year-Olds at High Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 (PCV13) should be administered to certain children aged 6 through 18 years who are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), according to a policy statement published online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: Calorie Counts Mandated at Chain Restaurants

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New rules announced Tuesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will have many restaurant chains posting calorie counts on their menus, and the rules even apply to movie theater popcorn and ice cream parlor fare.

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Hookahs Deliver Toxic Benzene in Every Puff

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many young people consider hookahs a hip and safer way to smoke, but a new study finds fumes from the water pipes contain the toxin benzene, which has been linked to an increased risk of leukemia. These findings were published online Nov. 21 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Successful Outcome Leads to Early Cessation of Sickle Cell Trial

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A clinical trial of hydroxyurea therapy for children with sickle cell anemia has been halted a year early because the results show it is a safe and effective way to manage the disease and reduce the risk of stroke. The announcement about the research, which was conducted at 25 medical centers in the United States and Canada, was made this week by the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

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Eczema Cases Rising Among U.S. Children

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of children are being diagnosed with eczema -- but it can usually be eased with topical treatments, according to a new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Newly Insured Under ACA May Have Trouble Finding Doctors

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans bought health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act in the past year and physicians may be reluctant to accept these patients.

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Pediatricians Should Be Involved in Oral Health Care

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should perform oral health assessments and help maintain and restore oral health for the youngest children, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Strategies Needed to Encourage Appropriate Antibiotic Selection

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although primary care providers are generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection, they do not always comply with these guidelines, according to research published in the December issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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AMA: Gender Inequality Still Exists in Medicine

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Gender inequality still exists in medicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Effect of Interventions to Improve Meds Adherence Vary

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of trials to improve medication adherence are inconsistent, with few studies of the highest quality demonstrating improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome, according to a review published online Nov. 20 in The Cochrane Library.

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Structured Education Program Beneficial for Anaphylaxis

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A structured education intervention improves knowledge and emergency management for patients at risk for anaphylaxis and their caregivers, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Allergy.

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CDC: Fewer Infants Dying Than Before

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More babies are being born at full term, resulting in fewer infant deaths, according to a November data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). However, the number of fetal deaths -- defined in this report as deaths of fetuses at 20 weeks' gestation or later -- stayed about the same from 2006 through 2012.

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Docs Define Competencies for Peds Hospice and Palliative Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Competencies need to be developed for pediatrics hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) subspecialty, according to a special article published online Nov. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Parents Want Children in Day Care to Be Vaccinated

TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Three-quarters of American parents would consider removing their children from day care if other children did not have all the recommended vaccinations, and many say that under-vaccinated children shouldn't be allowed to attend day care, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

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USPSTF: Evidence Low for Speech Delay Screen in Young Children

TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that there is currently insufficient evidence to weigh the benefits and harms of screening and treating children aged 5 and under for speech and language delays or disorders. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Nov. 17.

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Head Trauma in Abused Kids Can Have Lifelong Impact

MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Half of children who experience a severe abusive head trauma before the age of 5 will die before they turn 21, and among those who survive severe injuries, quality of life will be cut in half, according to new research. The findings were published online Nov. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Preterm-Birth Complications Leading Global Killer of Young

MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than 3,000 children under the age of 5 die worldwide each day from preterm birth complications, making it the leading cause of death among young children, according to the March of Dimes. That means that for the first time in history, complications from preterm births are the leading killer of young children around the globe.

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FDA: Two Generic Versions of ADHD Drug Not As Effective

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Two generic versions of the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug Concerta may not work as effectively as the brand-name product does, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday.

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NICU Infants Exposed to High Levels of DEHP in Medical Care

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may be exposed to levels of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) that are 4,000 to 160,000 times higher than what is considered safe, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in the Journal of Perinatology.

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Triple Aim Should Be Expanded to Address Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding the Triple Aim approach -- which includes enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs -- to the Quadruple Aim by adding the goal of improving health care provider work life is recommended, according to the authors of an article published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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CDC: More Than One-Fifth of High School Students Smoke

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than a fifth of American teens smoke or use tobacco in some way, according to research published in the Nov. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Prices Soaring for Some Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Market forces are dramatically driving up the cost of some generic drugs, prompting U.S. investigations into the pricing of what should be cheap alternatives to brand-name medications.

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Falls Leading Cause of Serious Head Trauma for Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For children under the age of 2, falls account for 77 percent of head injuries, and for children aged 2 to 12, falls cause 38 percent of head injuries. Among teens aged 13 to 17, head injuries are most often caused by assaults, sports, and car crashes. These findings were published in the Nov. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Team-Based Approach Can Reduce Cardiac Monitor Alarms

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A team-based approach can reduce excessive cardiac monitor alarms, according to a report published online Nov. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Preventable Hospitalizations ID'd in Pediatric Medical Complexity

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A review published online Nov. 10 in Pediatrics identifies the characteristics of preventable hospitalizations for children with medical complexity (CMC), and offers strategies for the prevention of these hospitalizations.

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Aspirin May Exacerbate Chronic Urticaria in Children

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In some children with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), exacerbations may be caused by hypersensitivity to aspirin, according to research published online Oct. 29 in Allergy.

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Laundry Detergent Pods Pose Poisoning Risk to Children

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Laundry detergent "pods," an alternative to traditional liquid and powder detergents, pose a serious health risk to children, especially those under age 3, according to a report published online Nov. 10 and in Pediatrics.

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CDC Spends $2.7 Million on Ebola Hospital Kits

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About $2.7 million in personal protective gear has been ordered for health care workers at U.S. hospitals treating Ebola patients, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

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Want to Be a Leader? Cultivate a Healthy Look

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's more important for potential business or political leaders to look healthy than intelligent, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

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Climate Change Will Boost Grass Pollen Production

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change will boost levels of grass pollen in the air in the next 100 years, resulting in more allergen exposure, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in PLOS ONE.

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Better Physician Communication at Shift Change Reduces Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Changing how doctors communicate during shift changes in hospitals reduces the risk of adverse events in patients by 30 percent, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Docs Spend ~16.6 Percent of Their Time on Administration

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 16.6 percent of doctors' working hours are spent on administrative work, according to a study published recently in the International Journal of Health Services.

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CDC: Newer Pneumonia Vaccine for Children Beats Older Version

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new pneumococcal vaccine is almost 30 percent more effective than its previous version in preventing hospitalizations of young children for pneumonia, according to research published in the Nov. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Genes May Determine Body Weight by Shaping Gut Bacteria

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Genes influence a person's body weight by determining the types of bacteria that live in the intestines, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of Cell.

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ADHD Linked to Expectant Mothers' Pollution Exposure

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women exposed to air pollution are five times more likely to have children who develop behavior problems related to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Nov. 5 in PLOS ONE.

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Google Glass Might Adversely Affect Vision

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Since its initial launch in 2013, Google Glass has been touted as a revolutionary entry into the world of "smart" eyewear. The promise: a broadly expanded visual experience with on-the-move, hands-free access to photos, videos, messaging, web-surfing, and apps. The catch: a small new study suggests that the structure of the glasses (rather than the software) may curtail natural peripheral vision, creating blind spots that undermine safety while engaging in routine tasks, such as driving or walking.

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Hospitalizations for Pulmonary Embolism Vary by Season

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations for pulmonary embolism (PE) are higher in the winter and lower in the summer, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Homeostasis.

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AMA: New Mapping Tool IDs Areas in Need of Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new interactive mapping tool can help physicians and their staff determine locations to establish or expand their practice, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Opening Visitation Access Boosts Patient, Family Experience

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Opening visitation access across all facilities can improve patient and family experience, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Journal of Nursing Administration.

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Better Detection Major Factor Behind Rise in Autism Cases

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The dramatic increase in the number of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder is largely the result of changes in how the condition is reported, Danish researchers contend. The report was published online Nov. 3 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Long-Term Shift Work May Drain the Brain

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Working non-standard hours -- "shift work" -- for many years is not only hard on the body, but may also dull the mind, new research suggests. According to the study, published online Nov. 3 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine, those who do shift work for more than 10 years seem to have the equivalent of an extra 6.5 years of age-related decline in memory and thinking skills.

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Ebola Elimination Possible With Early Patient Isolation

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Isolation of patients with Ebola in critical condition within days of symptom onset is likely to have a high chance of eliminating the disease, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Typical ADHD Care Leaves Room for Improvement

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many community-based pediatricians do not follow guideline-recommended care for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new study published online Nov. 3 in Pediatrics.

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AMA: Absence of Health Insurer Competition in Many Areas

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In most metropolitan areas, there is a significant absence of health insurer competition, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Preterm, Low Birth-Weight Babies May Need New Hips As Adults

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who were born preterm or at a low birth weight may have an increased risk of needing a hip replacement due to osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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