November 2014 Briefing - Gastroenterology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for November 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Health Care Organizations See Value of Telemedicine

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Health care organizations are developing and implementing telemedicine programs, although many have yet to receive reimbursement, according to a report published by Foley & Lardner.

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Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Disruption of Gut Microbiome

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Proton pump inhibitors may disrupt the microbiome of the digestive system, leading to infections and other complications, according to a small new study published online Nov. 25 in Microbiome.

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Perineal Self-Acupressure Beneficial in Constipation

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with functional constipation, perineal self-acupressure is associated with improved quality of life and bowel function, according to a study published online Nov. 10 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Newly Insured Under ACA May Have Trouble Finding Doctors

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans bought health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act in the past year and physicians may be reluctant to accept these patients.

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AMA: Gender Inequality Still Exists in Medicine

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Gender inequality still exists in medicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Effect of Interventions to Improve Meds Adherence Vary

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of trials to improve medication adherence are inconsistent, with few studies of the highest quality demonstrating improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome, according to a review published online Nov. 20 in The Cochrane Library.

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Early Nasoenteric Tube Feeding Doesn't Benefit Acute Pancreatitis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute pancreatitis at high risk of complications, early nasoenteric tube feeding does not improve outcomes compared with an oral diet after 72 hours, according to a study published in the Nov. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Triple Aim Should Be Expanded to Address Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding the Triple Aim approach -- which includes enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs -- to the Quadruple Aim by adding the goal of improving health care provider work life is recommended, according to the authors of an article published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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New Rx Regimen Produces HCV SVR in Liver Transplant Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug regimen produced high sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in a small group of liver transplant patients with recurrent hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection. The report was published online Nov. 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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U.S. Prices Soaring for Some Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Market forces are dramatically driving up the cost of some generic drugs, prompting U.S. investigations into the pricing of what should be cheap alternatives to brand-name medications.

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Many U.S. Doctors Wary of Genetic Testing

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many American doctors may not support genetic testing in patients without a major family history of certain illnesses, suggests a new survey of physicians. The report appears in the Nov. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Life Expectancy Equal to General Population With SVR in HCV

TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis, attaining sustained virological response (SVR) is associated with life expectancy comparable to the general population, according to a study published in the Nov. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fewer U.S. Hospitalizations for Hepatitis A

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a sharp decline in the rate of hospitalizations for hepatitis A in the United States, according to a study published online recently in Hepatology.

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Want to Be a Leader? Cultivate a Healthy Look

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's more important for potential business or political leaders to look healthy than intelligent, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

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Better Physician Communication at Shift Change Reduces Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Changing how doctors communicate during shift changes in hospitals reduces the risk of adverse events in patients by 30 percent, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Docs Spend ~16.6 Percent of Their Time on Administration

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 16.6 percent of doctors' working hours are spent on administrative work, according to a study published recently in the International Journal of Health Services.

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Genes May Determine Body Weight by Shaping Gut Bacteria

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Genes influence a person's body weight by determining the types of bacteria that live in the intestines, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of Cell.

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Colorectal Cancer on the Rise for U.S. Adults Under 50

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) have fallen among older Americans, cases among adults aged 20 to 49 are rising and expected to continue to do so, according to research published online Nov. 5 in JAMA Surgery.

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Repeated FITs May Be Equivalent Alternative to Colonoscopy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated annual fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) can detect all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and may be equivalent to colonoscopy in detecting advanced neoplasia in first-degree relatives of patients with CRC, according to a study published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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AMA: New Mapping Tool IDs Areas in Need of Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new interactive mapping tool can help physicians and their staff determine locations to establish or expand their practice, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Opening Visitation Access Boosts Patient, Family Experience

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Opening visitation access across all facilities can improve patient and family experience, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Journal of Nursing Administration.

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Vegetable Intake Reduces Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Increased intake of vegetables, but not fruit, is associated with a reduction in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to research published in the November issue of Gastroenterology.

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Long-Term Shift Work May Drain the Brain

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Working non-standard hours -- "shift work" -- for many years is not only hard on the body, but may also dull the mind, new research suggests. According to the study, published online Nov. 3 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine, those who do shift work for more than 10 years seem to have the equivalent of an extra 6.5 years of age-related decline in memory and thinking skills.

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Sofosbuvir Plus Ledipasvir Seems Effective for HCV Genotype 1

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV GT-1) infection who are ineligible for interferon therapy, and who relapsed after sofosbuvir and ribavirin treatment, sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir is a promising new therapy, according to a small study published in the Nov. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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AMA: Absence of Health Insurer Competition in Many Areas

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In most metropolitan areas, there is a significant absence of health insurer competition, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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CT Findings ID Tx Effectiveness in Small-Bowel Obstruction

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomographic (CT) findings can predict the effectiveness of nonsurgical treatment in patients with adhesive small-bowel obstruction (SBO), according to a study published in the November issue of Radiology.

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MicroRNAs Accurately ID Pancreatic Cancer

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Increased expression of a microRNA (miRNA) panel seems highly accurate for diagnosing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), according to a study published online Oct. 28 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Bariatric Surgery Substantially Reduces T2DM Risk in Obese

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in obese patients significantly lowers risk of developing type 2 diabetes, independent of other factors such as smoking, hypertension, and high cholesterol, according to a study published online Nov. 3 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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