November 2014 Briefing - Allergy

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for November 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Health Care Organizations See Value of Telemedicine

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Health care organizations are developing and implementing telemedicine programs, although many have yet to receive reimbursement, according to a report published by Foley & Lardner.

More Information

Home Visits Can Improve Asthma Control for Low-Income Adults

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For low-income adults with uncontrolled asthma, home visitation by community health workers is associated with improvements in asthma control and quality of life, according to a study published online Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Profilin Can Induce Severe Food-Allergic Reactions

TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Profilins are complete food allergens in food-allergic patient populations that are exposed to high levels of grass pollen, according to a study published in the December issue of Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Newly Insured Under ACA May Have Trouble Finding Doctors

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans bought health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act in the past year and physicians may be reluctant to accept these patients.

HealthCare.gov
Full Article

Eczema Cases Rising Among U.S. Children

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of children are being diagnosed with eczema -- but it can usually be eased with topical treatments, according to a new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics.

Full Article
Abstract
Full Text

AMA: Gender Inequality Still Exists in Medicine

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Gender inequality still exists in medicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Effect of Interventions to Improve Meds Adherence Vary

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of trials to improve medication adherence are inconsistent, with few studies of the highest quality demonstrating improvement in both adherence and clinical outcome, according to a review published online Nov. 20 in The Cochrane Library.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Structured Education Program Beneficial for Anaphylaxis

FRIDAY, Nov. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A structured education intervention improves knowledge and emergency management for patients at risk for anaphylaxis and their caregivers, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Trainee-Led Time-Outs Can Improve Antimicrobial Use

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Trainee-led time-outs to reevaluate antibiotic use can reduce costs in internal medicine units, according to a study published in a supplement to the Nov. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, highlighting the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Triple Aim Should Be Expanded to Address Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding the Triple Aim approach -- which includes enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs -- to the Quadruple Aim by adding the goal of improving health care provider work life is recommended, according to the authors of an article published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

U.S. Prices Soaring for Some Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Market forces are dramatically driving up the cost of some generic drugs, prompting U.S. investigations into the pricing of what should be cheap alternatives to brand-name medications.

Full Article
Full Text

Aspirin May Exacerbate Chronic Urticaria in Children

MONDAY, Nov. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In some children with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), exacerbations may be caused by hypersensitivity to aspirin, according to research published online Oct. 29 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Want to Be a Leader? Cultivate a Healthy Look

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's more important for potential business or political leaders to look healthy than intelligent, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

Full Article
Full Text

Climate Change Will Boost Grass Pollen Production

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change will boost levels of grass pollen in the air in the next 100 years, resulting in more allergen exposure, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in PLOS ONE.

Full Article
Full Text

Better Physician Communication at Shift Change Reduces Errors

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Changing how doctors communicate during shift changes in hospitals reduces the risk of adverse events in patients by 30 percent, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Article
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Docs Spend ~16.6 Percent of Their Time on Administration

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 16.6 percent of doctors' working hours are spent on administrative work, according to a study published recently in the International Journal of Health Services.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

BADGE Exposure Can Elicit Contact Allergy Reactions

THURSDAY, Nov. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to aluminum tubes for pharmaceutical use that are internally lacquered with epoxy resins (ER) based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) can elicit contact allergy reactions, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

AMA: New Mapping Tool IDs Areas in Need of Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new interactive mapping tool can help physicians and their staff determine locations to establish or expand their practice, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Long-Term Shift Work May Drain the Brain

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Working non-standard hours -- "shift work" -- for many years is not only hard on the body, but may also dull the mind, new research suggests. According to the study, published online Nov. 3 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine, those who do shift work for more than 10 years seem to have the equivalent of an extra 6.5 years of age-related decline in memory and thinking skills.

Full Article
Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

AMA: Absence of Health Insurer Competition in Many Areas

MONDAY, Nov. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In most metropolitan areas, there is a significant absence of health insurer competition, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

Bayer Stops U.S. Sale of Essure Birth Control Implant

Bayer Stops U.S. Sale of Essure Birth Control ...

Problems with device include chronic pain and perforations of the uterus and fallopian tubes

C.S. Mott Poll Addresses Child Safety at Amusement Parks

C.S. Mott Poll Addresses Child Safety at Amusement ...

2016 saw U.S. emergency departments deal with 30,000 injuries linked to amusement parks, carnivals

Greening Vacant Land Improves Neighborhood Mental Health

Greening Vacant Land Improves Neighborhood Mental Health

Cleaning up vacant lots in resource-limited urban settings can aid residents' mental health

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »