May 2015 Briefing - Neurology

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for May 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Physicians Driving the Slowing of Health Care Costs

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low physician spending is contributing to an overall slowing of health care costs, according to a viewpoint piece published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Score IDs Patients With Upper Extremity DVT at Low Risk

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT), six easily available factors can be used to create a score that identifies those at low risk of adverse events during the first week, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Post-CABG Predictors of Stroke Identified for Diabetes Patients

THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing multivessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), predictors of stroke include previous stroke, warfarin use, and surgery outside the United States or Canada, according to research published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vegan Diet Tied to Weight Loss, Improved Neuropathy in DM

THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A vegan diet might help patients with diabetic neuropathy lose weight and find some pain relief, a small pilot study suggests. The findings were published online May 26 in Nutrition & Diabetes.

Full Text

White Matter Changes May ID Markers of Alzheimer's Earlier

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Damage to the brain's white matter may be an early sign of certain types of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online May 27 in Radiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Caution Urged When Using EHR Shortcut Features

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Caution should be exercised with use of electronic health record (EHR) documentation short cuts, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Increasing Omega-3 Intake May Boost Cognitive Flexibility

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more omega-3 fatty acids may benefit patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published online May 21 in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

Abstract
Full Text

Large Practices Focused on Small Selection of EHR Products

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sixty percent of clinicians in practices with 26 or more clinicians report use of one of 10 electronic health record (EHR) products, according to a report published by AmericanEHR Partners.

More Information

Front Desk Staff Has Key Role in Managing Practice Cash Flow

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Three steps that can be implemented by front desk staff can help increase practices' cash flow, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

AMA: Avoiding Distress in Medical School

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Understanding the key drivers underlying medical students' distress can help address the issues and enhance student well-being, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

More Information

CDC: Smoking Rates on Decline in Many States

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking continues to decline in about half of American states, according to the latest U.S. government estimates. The new report was published in the May 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Progress Toward Mind-Controlled Robotic Limbs

FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have steadily been making progress in developing mind-controlled robotic limbs. One patient's case is reported in the May 22 issue of Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mental Health Services Up for U.S. Children

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of U.S. children and teens being treated for mental health issues has risen by about 50 percent in the past 20 years -- with most of those children having relatively mild symptoms, according to research published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

History of Depression May Raise Parkinson's Risk

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a history of depression seem to have a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to new research published online May 20 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CV Autonomic Neuropathy Predicts Urological Issues

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is associated with erectile dysfunction and/or lower urinary tract symptoms, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Statins, Fibrates Linked to 30% Lower Stroke Risk in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients taking statins or fibrates saw their risk of stroke over almost a decade decline by about one-third, according to a report published online May 19 in The BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial

Mortality, Stroke Risks Vary Widely After Carotid Stenting

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of death or stroke after carotid artery stenting varies widely among U.S. hospitals, with the odds four times higher at some medical centers, new research suggests. The study appears in the May issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tips Provided for Doctors Who Want to Move to Private Practice

MONDAY, May 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For physicians who want to transition to private practice, several factors need consideration, including finances, legal matters, and insurance, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Grip Strength Could Be Useful Indicator of CVD, Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, May 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Testing hand-grip strength could be an inexpensive and simple way of identifying people at increased risk for myocardial infarction, stroke, and premature death, according to a study published online May 13 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cognitive Improvements With Active Singing in Dementia

THURSDAY, May 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An active singing program can improve cognition and life satisfaction among individuals with dementia in an assisted living facility, according to a letter to the editor published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Marijuana Fails to Improve Symptoms in Dementia

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose oral tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) may not ease the common behavioral symptoms that affect people with dementia, according to a small study published online May 13 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Tied to Higher Stroke Risk, Even After Remission

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Depression in older adults appears to significantly increase the risk of a stroke, even after depressive symptoms remit, a new study suggests. The report was published online May 13 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
Full Text

High-Cacao Content Chocolate Has Acute Electrocortical Effect

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of high cacao chocolate is associated with an acute stimulating effect on the human brain and vasoconstrictive effects on the peripheral vasculature, according to a study published in NeuroRegulation.

Abstract
Full Text

Protein Seen in Parkinson's May Activate Immune System

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A protein known to accumulate in Parkinson's disease and other degenerative brain disorders, a-synuclein, could activate the brain's immune defenses, researchers say. Their study was published in the May 12 issue of Science Signaling.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

ADT for Prostate Cancer Tied to Impaired Cognition

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Men undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) to treat prostate cancer may experience impaired cognitive function within the first six months that persists for at least a year, a new study suggests. The report was published online May 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Guidance Offered to Help Doctors Deal With 'Dr. Google'

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Good communication is the key to resolving conflicts between the tests and treatment a patient may want based on online searches and those a physician believes are necessary, according to an article published online in Medical Economics.

More Information

New Health Care Index Reports Increases in Consumer Costs

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new Health Care Index shows increases in consumer costs, according to a report published by U.S. News & World Report.

More Information

Nondisclosure Clauses Often Used in Malpractice Settlements

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nondisclosure clauses are frequently used in malpractice settlement agreements, according to research published online May 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

β-Methylphenylethylamine + Exercise Can Cause Stroke

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- β-methylphenylethylamine (BMPEA), which is found in dietary supplements marketed to promote weight loss and improve exercise workouts, combined with exercise can cause hemorrhagic stroke, according to a case report published online May 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adding Olive Oil, Nuts to Diet Boosts Aging Brain Health

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adding more olive oil or nuts to a Mediterranean diet -- one rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, and whole grains and low in red meat -- may help improve cognitive function with advancing age, a new study suggests. The report was published online May 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased Risk of Neuropathy Seen With Celiac Disease

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for neuropathy, according to a new study published online May 11 in JAMA Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA: Senza Device Relieves Spinal Pain Without Paresthesia

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Senza spinal cord stimulation system has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat chronic intractable pain of the trunk and/or limbs, including pain associated with failed back surgery syndrome, low back pain, and leg pain. The device can reduce pain without the paresthesia that characterizes more traditional pain-relieving methods, according to a news release issued by the agency.

More Information

AMA: Six Traits of Financially Prepared Female Physicians

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The traits of a financially prepared female physician include having a retirement portfolio that is on track or ahead of schedule for age and career stage, having a liquid emergency fund, and feeling adequately protected in the event of a disability, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Awareness of Female-Specific Early Stroke Signs Lacking

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke is the third leading cause of death in women, but many are unaware of warning signs and symptoms that are unique to females, according to a survey conducted by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus.

More Information

Medical Students Want to Focus Learning on Preparing for Future

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students report wanting to learn more about topics that are not currently being taught, including leadership training, health policy, health economics, and experiential learning, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

ACA Tied to Nearly 17 Million Gaining Health Coverage

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), nearly 17 million previously uninsured Americans now have health coverage, according to a 2013 to 2015 report from the Rand Corporation.

Abstract
Full Text

Strategies Provided for Maximizing Payment

WEDNESDAY, May 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should use standard billing practices, including regular statements, to maximize accounts, and know that collection agencies and lawyers can help collect payment when necessary, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Full Text

High-Value Research of 2014 Presented for Geriatric Medicine

TUESDAY, May 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Articles relating to overtreatment of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and dementia care, as well as reduction of polypharmacy and adverse drug effects, are included in a special update summary published online April 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Five 'Top Issues' to Be Discussed at AMA Medical Student Forum

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Issues that will be at the forefront of the National Medical Student Meeting include vaccinations, health care economics, Medicaid expansion, medical education loans, and the nationwide opioid epidemic, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Concussion in Football Often Occurs During Practice

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Data on more than 20,000 young football players across the United States reveal that more than 57 percent of concussed high school and college players were injured at practice, not games. Among youth football players, almost half of concussions were sustained during practice. These findings were published online May 4 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stroke Patients Don't Appear to Benefit From EHR Use

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients fare about the same in terms of quality of care and illness progression whether their hospitals have embraced electronic health records or not. These findings were published in the May 12 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cuts in Epilepsy Drugs Boost Children's Post-Op IQ

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in children is tied to higher IQ post-epilepsy surgery, according to a study published online April 21 in the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

Bayer Stops U.S. Sale of Essure Birth Control Implant

Bayer Stops U.S. Sale of Essure Birth Control ...

Problems with device include chronic pain and perforations of the uterus and fallopian tubes

C.S. Mott Poll Addresses Child Safety at Amusement Parks

C.S. Mott Poll Addresses Child Safety at Amusement ...

2016 saw U.S. emergency departments deal with 30,000 injuries linked to amusement parks, carnivals

Greening Vacant Land Improves Neighborhood Mental Health

Greening Vacant Land Improves Neighborhood Mental Health

Cleaning up vacant lots in resource-limited urban settings can aid residents' mental health

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »