March 2018 Briefing - Pulmonology

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for March 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Simple Lung Function Tests in Primary Care Help ID Early COPD

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) A peak flow meter or microspirometer can be used routinely in primary care among patients with suspected chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for early case identification, according to a study published online March 13 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Receptivity to Tobacco Ads Linked to Progression to Use

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For adolescents, receptivity to tobacco advertising is associated with progression toward use, according to a study published online March 26 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Rate of MI, Stroke Higher After Respiratory Infection

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke remains higher after laboratory-confirmed Streptococcus pneumoniae or influenza, according to a study published March 21 in the European Respiratory Journal.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lag in Progress Against Lung CA Mortality in Midwest, Appalachia

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the Midwest and Appalachia there are areas where progress against lung cancer mortality among women is lagging compared with the rest of the nation, according to a study published March 30 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Novel Interstitium Has Been Identified in Human Tissues

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A previously unrecognized interstitium has been identified in human tissues, according to a study published online March 27 in Scientific Reports.

Abstract/Full Text

Liquids in E-Cigarettes Are Heterogeneous, Frequently Toxic

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The e-liquids used in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are a heterogeneous group, and there is a positive correlation between the number of chemicals contained in the liquid and the likelihood of its toxicity, according to a study published online March 27 in PLOS Biology.

Abstract/Full Text

Physical, Executive Function Most Affected After Ischemic Stroke

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The most affected health domains after ischemic stroke are physical function, executive function, and satisfaction with social roles, according to a study published online March 28 in Neurology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Use of E-Cigarettes May Hurt Efforts to Quit Smoking

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Among smokers who plan to quit after being discharged from the hospital, electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users are less likely to abstain from tobacco at six months, compared to nonusers, according to a study published online March 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Condition Readmission Measures Don't Reflect Overall Quality

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Current publicly reported measures may not be good surrogates for overall hospital quality related to 30-day readmissions, according to a study published online March 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

1980 to 2014 Saw Decrease in U.S. Mortality From Infectious Diseases

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There were declines in mortality from most categories of infectious diseases between 1980 and 2014 in the United States, according to a study published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

EHR Usability Contributes to Possible Patient Harm Events

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health record (EHR) usability may contribute to possible patient harm events, according to a research letter published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ethical Duties ID'd for Short-Term Global Health Experiences

MONDAY, March 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published online March 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, ethical obligations have been detailed for physicians participating in short-term global health experiences (STEGHs).

Abstract/Full Text

Measles in Childhood Affects Airflow Obstruction in Midlife

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood measles infection appears to compound the associations between smoking, current asthma, and post-bronchodilator airflow obstruction, according to a study published online March 20 in Respirology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

MVPA Mortality Risk Reduction Not Tied to Exercise in Bouts

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is associated with reduced mortality risk, regardless of whether it is accumulated in bouts, according to a study published online March 22 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract/Full Text

Lean Approach May Help Tackle Burnout in Health Care Providers

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Lean approach, which emphasizes reducing waste and improving customer value by focusing on the big picture, can be used to address physician burnout, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

Unique Risks Associated With Texting Medical Orders

THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the popularity, convenience, and speed of texting medical orders, there are unique and alarming risks associated with the practice, according to a report published in Drug Topics.

Abstract/Full Text

High-Flow O2 Therapy Feasible for Infants With Bronchiolitis

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- High-flow oxygen therapy may be more effective than standard oxygen therapy in preventing care escalation among infants with bronchiolitis treated outside an intensive care unit, according to a study published in the March 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nightmares Common in Military Personnel With Sleep Disturbance

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. military personnel with sleep disturbances, nightmares are highly prevalent, and nightmares are frequently comorbid with other sleep and mental health disorders, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Adjuvant Long-Acting Muscarinic Antagonist Improves Asthma

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with persistent asthma, the use of long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) versus placebo as an adjunct to inhaled corticosteroids, and combined use of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists (LABAs), termed single maintenance and reliever therapy (SMART), are associated with a reduced risk of exacerbations, according to two reviews published online March 19 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text 1
Abstract/Full Text 2
Editorial

Blueprint Being Developed to Address Physician Burnout

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new, three-pronged approach is being applied to develop a blueprint for addressing physician burnout, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

Personal Health Info Found in Recycling at Five Hospitals

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable amount of personal health information (PHI) and personally identifiable information (PII) was found in the recycling at five Canadian teaching hospitals, according to a research letter published in the March 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment nay be required)

In-Flight Transmission of Respiratory Diseases Low

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The probability of direct transmission of respiratory diseases is low for passengers on transcontinental U.S. flights not seated in close proximity to an infectious passenger, according to a study published online March 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract/Full Text

Decision Characteristics Impact Decision Making in NICU

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For parents with an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), preferences for parent-centered decision making are positively associated with decisions that involve big-picture goals and have the potential to harm the infant, according to a study published online March 19 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment nay be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment nay be required)

Prior Authorization Negatively Impacts Clinical Outcomes

MONDAY, March 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The burdens associated with prior authorization (PA) are high and include a negative impact on clinical outcomes, reported by 92 percent of physicians, according to the results of a survey conducted for the American Medical Association (AMA).

Press Release
Survey

Reduced Cortical Thickness ID'd in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced cortical thickness is seen in individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) versus controls, with multiple regions of reduced thickness seen in the superior frontal lobe in females with OSA, according to a study published online March 6 in PLOS ONE.

Abstract/Full Text

Hemodynamic Parameters Predict Outcome in PH-HFpEF

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The hemodynamic parameters transpulmonary gradient, pulmonary vascular resistance, and diastolic pulmonary gradient are associated with mortality and cardiac hospitalization in pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), according to a study published online March 14 in JAMA Cardiology.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Grass Peptide Immunotherapy Cuts Seasonal Allergy Symptoms

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Immunotherapy with peptide hydrolysates from Lolium perenne (LPP) reduces seasonal allergy symptoms and is generally well tolerated, according to a study published online March 7 in Allergy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

VTE Risk Up in Most Emergency General Surgery Patients

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost all emergency general surgery (EGS) patients treated operatively and nonoperatively have increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and should receive prophylactic treatment, according to a review published online March 14 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text

Higher Exposure to Air Pollution Adds to CVD Risk for Blacks

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks have significantly higher exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (particles with median aerodynamic diameter <2.5 µm [PM2.5]), with exposure associated with elevated blood glucose, worse endothelial function, and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online March 15 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Harms Than Benefits for E-Cigarettes at Population Level

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are associated with more harm than benefit on a population level, according to a study published online March 14 in PLOS ONE.

Abstract/Full Text

Gut Bacteria May Be Tied to Brain Dysfunction From Sepsis

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Gut bacteria may be tied to sepsis-related brain dysfunction, according to a study published recently in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Teens Using Tobacco Don't Self-Identify As Users

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many adolescent users of one or more specific tobacco product type do not self-identify as tobacco users, according to a study published online March 12 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco System Releases Toxic Chemical

WEDNESDAY, March 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the I quit original smoking (iQOS) heat-not-burn system chars the tobacco plug, and the device releases a toxic chemical, according to a study published online March 13 in Tobacco Control.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Copayments Often Exceed Prescription Drug Costs

WEDNESDAY, March 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Drug copayments frequently exceed prescription drug costs, with overpayments affecting 23 percent of all prescriptions, according to a research letter published in the March 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Spends Twice As Much for Similar Health Care Utilization

TUESDAY, March 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on health care is much higher in the United States than other high-income countries, but utilization rates are similar, according to a study published in the March 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial 2 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial 3 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial 4 (subscription or payment may be required)

Bronchial Thermoplasty Can Improve Severe Asthmatic Cough

TUESDAY, March 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Bronchial thermoplasty can treat severe asthmatic cough that is unresponsive to conventional therapies, according to a case report published online March 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Three-Pronged Approach Can Improve Physician Engagement

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The three-pronged approach implemented by one practice successfully improved physician engagement, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

Odds of Opioid Prescriptions Up in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of opioid prescription are increased for patients with head and neck cancer (HNCA) versus those with lung or colon cancer (LCCA), according to a research letter published online March 8 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors Facing Challenge to Help Needy While Protecting Practices

FRIDAY, March 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are increasingly being challenged to protect their practice finances while helping patients without insurance, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

Current Tobacco Smoke Exposure Doesn't Obstruct Peds Airflow

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Current tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) is not associated with airflow obstruction among school-aged children, while prenatal smoking is associated with airflow obstruction in children with asthma, according to a study published in the March issue of CHEST.

Abstract/Full Text

Severe Sleep Apnea During REM Sleep Tied to Acute CV Events

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that occurs during REM sleep is associated with recurrent cardiovascular events in those with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many PICCs Placed Have Dwell Time of No More Than Five Days

WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- About 25 percent of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) placed have a dwell time of five days or less, and almost 10 percent of patients with a short-term PICC experience a complication, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Quintupled Glucocorticoid Dose No Help in Pediatric Asthma

TUESDAY, March 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Quintupling the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids seems not to be effective for preventing exacerbations among children with asthma, while quadrupling the dose may be beneficial for adolescents and adults, according to two studies published online March 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text - Jackson
Abstract/Full Text - McKeever
Editorial

Increase in Other Flavored Tobacco Use After Menthol Ban

MONDAY, March 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a ban on menthol cigarettes results in an increase in those attempting to quit, and an increase in use of other flavored tobacco or electronic-cigarette use, according to a study published online March 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Determining 'Avoidability' of Nursing Home Transfers Complex

MONDAY, March 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of acute transfers from nursing facilities to hospitals are potentially avoidable, but symptoms and risk conditions are only weakly predictive of hospital diagnoses, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Excretion of Volatile Organic Compounds Up in Teen E-Smokers

MONDAY, March 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents smoking electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarettes) only have significantly higher excretion of volatile organic chemical compounds than non-smokers, although the levels are lower than among those using cigarettes in addition to e-cigarettes, according to a study published online March 5 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

'Western' Diet Associated With Respiratory Symptoms, COPD

FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A "Western" diet appears to be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diet-Treated Chronic Illness May Lead to Disordered Eating

THURSDAY, March 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Interventions for diet-treated chronic illnesses may increase the risk for disordered eating in children, according to a review published online Feb. 22 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CPAP Non-Adherence Tied to CV, All-Cause Hospital Readmissions

THURSDAY, March 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Non-adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is tied to higher rates of hospital readmission for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to a study published in a recent issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

FDA Permits Marketing of Brain Stimulation Device for OCD

FDA Permits Marketing of Brain Stimulation Device for ...

FDA previously approved transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depression, certain migraines

Comments Open on End of NIH Review for Gene Therapy Studies

Comments Open on End of NIH Review for ...

NIH oversight panel no longer plans to review all applications for gene therapy experiments

U.S. Measles Outbreak Hits 107 Cases in 21 States, D.C.

U.S. Measles Outbreak Hits 107 Cases in 21 ...

Outbreak on track to exceed last year's; most of the people who got measles weren't vaccinated

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »