March 2018 Briefing - Orthopedics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for March 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pectoralis Major Tears Described in Deployed Military Personnel

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Deployed military personnel may be at high risk for pectoralis major tears, according to a study published online in the Journal of Orthopedics & Rheumatology.

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Novel Interstitium Has Been Identified in Human Tissues

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A previously unrecognized interstitium has been identified in human tissues, according to a study published online March 27 in Scientific Reports.

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2007-2013 Saw Increase in THA Revisions for 45- to 64-Year-Olds

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Patients aged 45 to 64 years had an increase in the total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision rate from 2007 to 2013, although decreases were seen in all other age groups, according to a study published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Casting, Surgery Equivalent Over Long Term for Unstable Ankle Fx

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For older patients with acute unstable malleolar fractures, equivalence in function between close contact casting and immediate surgery strategies persists at three years, according to a research letter published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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EHR Usability Contributes to Possible Patient Harm Events

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health record (EHR) usability may contribute to possible patient harm events, according to a research letter published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Children's Hoverboard, Skateboard Injuries Are Similar

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Injury characteristics among hoverboard riders and skateboarders are similar, according to a study published online March 26 in Pediatrics.

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Ethical Duties ID'd for Short-Term Global Health Experiences

MONDAY, March 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published online March 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, ethical obligations have been detailed for physicians participating in short-term global health experiences (STEGHs).

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Lean Approach May Help Tackle Burnout in Health Care Providers

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Lean approach, which emphasizes reducing waste and improving customer value by focusing on the big picture, can be used to address physician burnout, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Unique Risks Associated With Texting Medical Orders

THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the popularity, convenience, and speed of texting medical orders, there are unique and alarming risks associated with the practice, according to a report published in Drug Topics.

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Short-Term PPIs Tied to Higher Hip Fracture Risk in Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term proton pump inhibitor use, but not long-term or cumulative use, is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture among Alzheimer's patients, according to a study published online March 6 in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

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Blueprint Being Developed to Address Physician Burnout

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new, three-pronged approach is being applied to develop a blueprint for addressing physician burnout, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Personal Health Info Found in Recycling at Five Hospitals

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable amount of personal health information (PHI) and personally identifiable information (PII) was found in the recycling at five Canadian teaching hospitals, according to a research letter published in the March 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Custom-Made Foot Orthotics No Benefit for Plantar Heel Pain

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Custom-made foot orthotics appear to be no better than over-the-counter insoles or other conservative treatments for heel pain, according to a review published online March 19 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Prior Authorization Negatively Impacts Clinical Outcomes

MONDAY, March 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The burdens associated with prior authorization (PA) are high and include a negative impact on clinical outcomes, reported by 92 percent of physicians, according to the results of a survey conducted for the American Medical Association (AMA).

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No Benefit for MRI After Normal Cervical CT in Blunt Trauma

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with obtunded blunt trauma to the cervical spine, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up appears not to be beneficial after normal cervical computed tomography (CT) findings, according to a study published online March 14 in JAMA Surgery.

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Drug Copayments Often Exceed Prescription Drug Costs

WEDNESDAY, March 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Drug copayments frequently exceed prescription drug costs, with overpayments affecting 23 percent of all prescriptions, according to a research letter published in the March 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.S. Spends Twice As Much for Similar Health Care Utilization

TUESDAY, March 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on health care is much higher in the United States than other high-income countries, but utilization rates are similar, according to a study published in the March 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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PTs Support Interprofessional Model of Care With Pharmacists

TUESDAY, March 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of Canadian physical therapists positively view a new interprofessional model of care with pharmacists, according to a study published online March 6 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Three-Pronged Approach Can Improve Physician Engagement

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The three-pronged approach implemented by one practice successfully improved physician engagement, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Doctors Present Recs For and Against Acupuncture for Pain

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The reasons for and against recommending acupuncture for treating pain are discussed in a head-to-head article published online March 7 in The BMJ.

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Doctors Facing Challenge to Help Needy While Protecting Practices

FRIDAY, March 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are increasingly being challenged to protect their practice finances while helping patients without insurance, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Falls in Elderly Patients Cost $50 Billion Annually

FRIDAY, March 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Older adult falls result in substantial medical costs, according to a study published online March 7 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Plantar-Lateral Plating Beneficial in Simulated Jones Fracture

FRIDAY, March 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with intramedullary screw fixation, plantar-lateral plating allows for greater cycles to failure and peak load before failure when applied to cadaver foot specimens with simulated Jones fracture, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Patient-Reported Outcome Tool Developed for Lumbar Spine Sx

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A patient-reported outcome (PRO) tool has been developed and validated to predict response after lumbar spine surgery, according to a study published online March 7 in JAMA Surgery.

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Total Hip Arthroplasty Linked to Increased Survival for 10 Years

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is associated with increased life expectancy during the 10 years after surgery, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research.

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Surgeons Often Do Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy

WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM)-only procedures make up 66.7 percent of knee arthroscopies performed by low- and high-volume surgeons, according to a research letter published online Feb. 28 in JAMA Surgery.

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Multimodal Analgesia Cuts Complications Post Arthroplasty

WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Use of multimodal analgesia is associated with fewer complications, reduced opioid prescriptions, and reduced hospital length of stay after total hip/knee arthroplasty, according to a study published online March 1 in Anesthesiology.

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Opioids Don't Top Non-Opioids for Pain-Related Function

TUESDAY, March 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid treatment is not superior to non-opioid treatment for improving pain-related function over 12 months, according to a study published in the March 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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