March 2018 Briefing - Infectious Disease

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Infectious Disease for March 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Rate of MI, Stroke Higher After Respiratory Infection

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke remains higher after laboratory-confirmed Streptococcus pneumoniae or influenza, according to a study published March 21 in the European Respiratory Journal.

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Duration of Antibiotics Often Exceeds Guidelines for Sinusitis

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The durations of most courses of antibiotic therapy for adult outpatients with sinusitis exceed guideline recommendations, according to a research letter published online March 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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CDC: Many Adults Not Receiving Sexual Risk Assessments

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of women and a quarter of men with recent sexual activity receive sexual risk assessment, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Novel Interstitium Has Been Identified in Human Tissues

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A previously unrecognized interstitium has been identified in human tissues, according to a study published online March 27 in Scientific Reports.

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Children With ASD, Younger Siblings Are Undervaccinated

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with the general population, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their younger siblings are undervaccinated, according to a study published online March 26 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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EHR Usability Contributes to Possible Patient Harm Events

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health record (EHR) usability may contribute to possible patient harm events, according to a research letter published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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1980 to 2014 Saw Decrease in U.S. Mortality From Infectious Diseases

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There were declines in mortality from most categories of infectious diseases between 1980 and 2014 in the United States, according to a study published in the March 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Condition Readmission Measures Don't Reflect Overall Quality

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Current publicly reported measures may not be good surrogates for overall hospital quality related to 30-day readmissions, according to a study published online March 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Hepatitis C Screening Increasing Among Baby Boomers

TUESDAY, March 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For baby boomers, born between 1945 and 1965, the odds of hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening increase over time, although the rates of screening are low, according to a study published online March 27 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Ethical Duties ID'd for Short-Term Global Health Experiences

MONDAY, March 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published online March 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, ethical obligations have been detailed for physicians participating in short-term global health experiences (STEGHs).

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For Those With HIV, Symptom Burden Higher in Women

MONDAY, March 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The burden of two of the most common symptoms in patients living with HIV -- fatigue and muscle aches/joint pains -- is higher in women, according to a study published online March 5 in Menopause.

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BMI Linked to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk in Chronic Hep B

MONDAY, March 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV), body mass index (BMI) is significantly associated with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with the risk more pronounced for women than men, according to a research letter published online March 22 in JAMA Oncology.

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Measles in Childhood Affects Airflow Obstruction in Midlife

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood measles infection appears to compound the associations between smoking, current asthma, and post-bronchodilator airflow obstruction, according to a study published online March 20 in Respirology.

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Lean Approach May Help Tackle Burnout in Health Care Providers

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Lean approach, which emphasizes reducing waste and improving customer value by focusing on the big picture, can be used to address physician burnout, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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MVPA Mortality Risk Reduction Not Tied to Exercise in Bouts

FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is associated with reduced mortality risk, regardless of whether it is accumulated in bouts, according to a study published online March 22 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Unique Risks Associated With Texting Medical Orders

THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the popularity, convenience, and speed of texting medical orders, there are unique and alarming risks associated with the practice, according to a report published in Drug Topics.

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Vaccine-Derived Immune Protection Against Mumps Wanes

THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccine-derived immune protection against mumps wanes on average 27 years after vaccination, according to a study published online March 21 in Science Translational Medicine.

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H. Pylori Treatment Tied to Lower Metachronous Gastric Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in patients who underwent endoscopic resection of early-stage gastric cancer or high-grade adenoma is associated with a reduced rate of metachronous gastric cancer, according to a study published in the March 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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HIV Incidence Down in All Except Men Who Have Sex With Men

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From 2008 to 2015, there was a decrease in modeled HIV incidence in all transmission risk groups except men who have sex with men (MSM), according to research published online March 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Blueprint Being Developed to Address Physician Burnout

WEDNESDAY, March 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new, three-pronged approach is being applied to develop a blueprint for addressing physician burnout, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Personal Health Info Found in Recycling at Five Hospitals

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable amount of personal health information (PHI) and personally identifiable information (PII) was found in the recycling at five Canadian teaching hospitals, according to a research letter published in the March 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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In-Flight Transmission of Respiratory Diseases Low

TUESDAY, March 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The probability of direct transmission of respiratory diseases is low for passengers on transcontinental U.S. flights not seated in close proximity to an infectious passenger, according to a study published online March 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Prior Authorization Negatively Impacts Clinical Outcomes

MONDAY, March 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The burdens associated with prior authorization (PA) are high and include a negative impact on clinical outcomes, reported by 92 percent of physicians, according to the results of a survey conducted for the American Medical Association (AMA).

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2013 to 2016 Saw No Change in Antibiotic Prescribing Practices

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From 2013 to 2016, annual national outpatient antibiotic prescribing practices remained unchanged, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

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Oseltamivir Not Linked to Suicide Risk in Pediatric Patients

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Oseltamivir does not appear to be associated with suicide risk in pediatric patients, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Higher Burden of Trichomonas vaginalis Infection in U.S. Blacks

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The burden of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection is disproportionately high among blacks in the United States, according to a study published online March 15 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Gut Bacteria May Be Tied to Brain Dysfunction From Sepsis

THURSDAY, March 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Gut bacteria may be tied to sepsis-related brain dysfunction, according to a study published recently in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Zika-Tied Birth Defects in 7 Percent of Infected Pregnant Women

WEDNESDAY, March 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Seven percent of pregnant women with symptomatic Zika virus (ZIKV) infection have birth defects possibly associated with ZIKV infection, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Drug Copayments Often Exceed Prescription Drug Costs

WEDNESDAY, March 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Drug copayments frequently exceed prescription drug costs, with overpayments affecting 23 percent of all prescriptions, according to a research letter published in the March 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bundled Intervention May Improve HPV Vaccination Rates

WEDNESDAY, March 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A bundled intervention comprising quality improvement (QI) training plus provider prompts, communication skills training, and performance feedback may improve human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates in pediatric clinics, according to a study published online March 14 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. Spends Twice As Much for Similar Health Care Utilization

TUESDAY, March 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Spending on health care is much higher in the United States than other high-income countries, but utilization rates are similar, according to a study published in the March 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Three-Pronged Approach Can Improve Physician Engagement

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The three-pronged approach implemented by one practice successfully improved physician engagement, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Over 5,100 Noncongenital Zika Cases Reported in U.S. in 2016

MONDAY, March 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A total of 5,168 noncongenital Zika virus disease cases were reported from U.S. states and the District of Columbia in 2016, with 95 percent of cases identified in travelers returning from Zika virus-affected areas, according to research published in the March 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Doctors Facing Challenge to Help Needy While Protecting Practices

FRIDAY, March 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians are increasingly being challenged to protect their practice finances while helping patients without insurance, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Increase in Acetaminophen Use, Overuse in Cold/Flu Season

FRIDAY, March 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- During cold/flu season (CFS) there is an increase in acetaminophen use and overdosing, according to a study published online March 7 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Maternal Use of TDF Doesn't Further Reduce HBV Transmission

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal use of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) in addition to administration of hepatitis B immune globulin and hepatitis B vaccine to infants born to hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive pregnant women does not further lower the rate of hepatitis B virus transmission, according to a study published in the March 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA Approves First Screening Tests for Tickborne Parasite

WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The first set of blood screening tests for the tickborne parasite Babesia microti have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Vaccine Exposure in First 23 Months Has No Adverse Impact

WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated cumulative vaccine antigen exposure through age 23 months does not differ significantly for children with versus those without hospital visits for infectious diseases not targeted by vaccines from age 24 to 47 months, according to a study published in the March 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many PICCs Placed Have Dwell Time of No More Than Five Days

WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- About 25 percent of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) placed have a dwell time of five days or less, and almost 10 percent of patients with a short-term PICC experience a complication, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Prophylaxis Can Prevent HCV Infection in Kidney Recipients

TUESDAY, March 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-acting antiviral prophylaxis is safe and prevents chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after kidney transplantation from HCV-infected donors to noninfected recipients, according to a study published online March 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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HPV Vaccine Intervention Tied to Increased Vaccination

TUESDAY, March 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For adolescents, a health care professional human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine communication intervention is associated with improved HPV vaccine series initiation and completion, according to a study published online March 5 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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S. epidermidis Producing 6-HAP May Protect From Skin Neoplasia

THURSDAY, March 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis producing 6-N-hydroxyaminopurine (6-HAP) may provide protection against skin neoplasia, according to research published online Feb. 28 in Scientific Advances.

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