March 2015 Briefing - Pediatrics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for March 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Mobile Health App Use Continuing to Increase

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of mobile health apps is continuing to increase and doctors are embracing this trend, with more than one-third of physicians recommending their use in the past year, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Routine Iron Supplementation

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking iron supplements during pregnancy doesn't appear to significantly change any health outcomes for mother or infant, a new review shows. A second review -- this one on infants and toddlers -- found no evidence that iron supplements improved growth or development. The findings on pregnant women were released online March 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The findings on children were published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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Small, Steady Decline in Cancer Rates in U.S. Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- America is making slow but steady progress against cancer, with a continuing decline in cancer deaths, according to a new report published online March 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The report was coauthored by experts from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

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Glyburide in Gestational DM Linked to Complications

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When used to treat gestational diabetes, glyburide has been linked to a number of complications in the infant, according to a new study. The report was published online March 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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AAP Opposes Random Drug Testing in Schools

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, the American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirms its stance against random drug testing in schools. The group suggests schools redirect their limited resources toward helping students avoid or overcome drug problems. The report was published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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AAP: Use Only Metric Dosing for Children's Medications

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The best way to measure liquid medications for children is in metric milliliters, according to a committee from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Accidental medication overdoses send more than 70,000 children to U.S. emergency departments each year, according to background information with the statement, which was published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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2015 Match Sees High Proportion of Unmatched Seniors

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 6.1 percent of U.S. allopathic medical school seniors in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) were not placed into first-year residency positions, with a higher percentage of unmatched seniors than in 2014, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Recommendations for Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Peds ER

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians should be trained in point-of-care ultrasonography, according to a policy statement published online March 30 in Pediatrics.

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Most Young Pediatricians Satisfied With First Jobs

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatricians, most first jobs meet career goals and desired responsibilities, according to a study published online March 23 in Pediatrics.

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AAFP Issues Comprehensive Breastfeeding Toolkit

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new breastfeeding toolkit is available, which includes the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) business case for why employers should support breastfeeding, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Prenatal Exposure to Pollutants May Affect Fetal Brain

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to common air pollutants before birth may make children more likely to have the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other thinking and behavioral problems, a small new study suggests. The findings were published online March 25 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Physicians Should Be Aware of Signs of Burnout

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout can be prevented if physicians are aware of the warning signs, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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Rotational Instrument Delivery OK for Fetal Malposition

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal outcomes are no worse with rotational instrumental delivery than with cesarean delivery for persistent fetal malposition, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Family-Centered Care Improves Outcomes in Children With ADHD

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), receiving more family-centered, compassionate care may be more effective than standard care, a new study has found. The findings were published online March 23 in Pediatrics.

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Universal Alcohol Interlock Could Cut Many Crash Deaths/Injuries

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Installation of an alcohol interlock device in all new U.S. vehicles is estimated to be cost-effective in preventing alcohol-related crash fatalities and injuries, according to a study published online March 19 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Electronic Solutions Underway for Rx Prior Authorizations

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts are underway to offer technological solutions to the burdens associated with prior authorizations, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Revised Guidelines Released for Peds Cardiology Fellowship

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Society of Pediatric Cardiology Training Program Directors have developed the 2015 Training Guidelines for Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program together with the American College of Cardiology, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Heart Association.

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Dietary Omega-3 Supplements Improve ADHD Symptoms

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is associated with improvement in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms for children with ADHD and typically developing children, according to a study published online March 19 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Handheld Echocardiography Ups Rheumatic Heart Dz Detection

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Handheld echocardiography (HAND) and auscultation improves detection of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) compared with auscultation alone, according to a study published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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Assisted Reproductive Technology Linked to Autism

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is associated with increased incidence of autism, according to a study published online March 19 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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CDC: Decline in TB Rates in the United States Slowing Down

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As health officials in Kansas struggle with an outbreak of tuberculosis (TB) at a local high school, federal officials reported Thursday that the annual decline in U.S. cases is slowing. The report was published in the March 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Over Two Dozen Test Positive for TB at Kansas High School

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than 300 students and staff at Olathe Northwest High School were tested last week after a reported case of tuberculosis (TB) at the school. The testing identified 27 more people with TB infection, the Kansas City Star reported.

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FDA Approves Cholbam for Rare Bile Acid Synthesis Disorders

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cholbam (cholic acid) capsules have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults and children with bile acid synthesis disorders and peroxisomal disorders, the agency said in a news release.

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Breastfeeding Linked to Improved IQ at Age 30

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding is associated with improved performance in intelligence tests at age 30, according to a study from Brazil published in the April issue of The Lancet Global Health.

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Interventions Up Blood Culture Ordering in Pediatric Pneumonia

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Interventions can increase blood culture ordering in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with no effect on length of stay (LOS), according to a study published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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More Than 16 Million Americans Have Gained Coverage Under ACA

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Obama Administration reported Monday the largest drop in the number of Americans without health insurance since the Johnson administration expanded health coverage through Medicare and Medicaid 50 years ago.

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Propranolol Seems Prophylactic Against Infantile Hemangiomas

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Propranolol seems to be prophylactic against infantile hemangiomas, according to a case report published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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MMR Vaccination Rates Might Be As Low As 50 Percent

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination rates are estimated at between 50 and 86 percent among the population exposed to the recent measles outbreak, according to a research letter published online March 16 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Gender-Specific Variation in Medical Specialties

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical specialties vary by gender, with obstetrics/gynecology and pediatrics dominated by female residents and specialties such as surgery, emergency medicine, and anesthesiology dominated by males, according to a report published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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HCPs Lack Knowledge and Awareness of Sex Trafficking

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers demonstrate significant knowledge gaps regarding sex trafficking (ST), according to research published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

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HHS Wants to Help Restore Joy of Medicine

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is listening to physicians and wants to address the regulatory burdens they face, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Researchers Estimate Physician Shortage for 2035

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Based on current demographics and utilization of primary care services, more than 44,000 primary care physicians will be needed by 2035, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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New Model Proposed for Hypersensitivity/Allergic Disease

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new model has been proposed for classification of hypersensitivity/allergic diseases ahead of the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), according to a position paper published online March 4 in Allergy.

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Getting Heard May Be Key to Getting New Job

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Your voice may be the key to landing a new job, researchers report in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

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IOM: Raise Legal Age to 21 for Tobacco Purchase

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Raising the legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21 would save hundreds of thousands of lives and substantially reduce the number of smokers in the United States, a new report finds.

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HealthDay/Harris Poll: More Americans in Favor of Vaccination

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the wake of the measles outbreak that has generated headlines for months, more Americans now say they have positive feelings toward childhood vaccinations, according to a new HealthDay/Harris Poll.

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Powdered Alcohol Approved by U.S. Regulators

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. regulators have approved a controversial powdered alcohol product called Palcohol, which is meant to be mixed into drinks.

Health Highlights: March 11, 2015

Poll: Majority of Americans Interested in Genetic Testing

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of Americans taking part in a new poll said they'd be interested in genetic testing to see if they or their children are at risk for serious illnesses. The findings were published online March 6 in Public Health Genomics.

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Clinical Trial Data Often Not Reported in Timely Manner

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are not promptly reporting the results of clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov, according to an article published in the March 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physicians Should Plan Exit Strategy in Advance

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should begin planning their exit strategy three to five years in advance, according to the American Medical Association.

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Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide Physician Misery Index is 3.7 out of 5, with the vast majority of physicians reporting that the business and regulation of health care has worsened the practice of medicine, according to a report published by Geneia.

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Persistent EHR Nonadoption Could Mean Lower Payment

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent nonadopters of electronic health records (EHRs) tend to be older, and are employed in smaller practices, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Melatonin Use in Children Raises Safety Concerns

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable safety concerns surround use of melatonin for children with sleep disorders, according to a review article published online Feb. 3 in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health.

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Subthreshold Mania May Mean Bipolarity in High-Risk Youth

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Subthreshold manic or hypomanic episodes may be a diagnostic precursor to bipolar disorder in the children of parents with bipolar disorder, according to research published online March 3 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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AAMC: Significant Shortfall of Physicians Projected for 2025

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The expected shortfall of physicians is projected to reach about 46,000 to 90,000 by 2025, according to a study conducted by IHS Inc. for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Paternal, Maternal Depression May Up Asthma Risk for Baby

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A child may face an increased risk of asthma if the child's mother or father experienced depression during the pregnancy or if the mother took an older antidepressant to treat her condition, new research suggests. The study findings were published online March 9 in Pediatrics.

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Cleaning Umbilical Cord With Chlorhexidine Lowers Mortality

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Using chlorhexidine to clean the umbilical cords of infants born outside of a hospital lowers infant infection and death rates in developing countries, according to a review published online March 5 in The Cochrane Library.

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Changes Being Made to Med School Applicant Assessment

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In accordance with the changes in graduate medical education to better prepare doctors for a changing health care system, changes are being made to medical school applicant evaluation, according to an article published Feb. 19 by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Model Explores Impact of Vitamin D, Omega-3 Deficiency

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A model has been proposed to explain the influence of inadequate vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids on brain dysfunction via serotonin levels, according to a review published online Feb. 24 in The FASEB Journal.

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Psychotherapy for Child Anxiety Offers Long-Term Benefits

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Successful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for an anxiety disorder in childhood is associated with lasting protection against suicidal ideation, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Confidence Gap Between Male and Female Med Students

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Female medical students perform at the same or higher level as men, but they lack confidence compared with men, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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National Hospital Rating Systems Rarely in Agreement

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- National hospital rating systems are rarely in agreement, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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FDA Launches First App to Identify Drug Shortages

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A mobile phone application (app) has been released to identify current drug shortages, resolved shortages, or discontinuations of drug products, according to a press release published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Six Months of Valganciclovir in CMV Provides Long-Term Benefit

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For neonates with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV), six months of valganciclovir does not improve hearing in the short term, but is associated with improved outcomes in the long term, according to a study published in the March 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Rush University Adds Patient Scores to Doctor Profiles

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rush University Medical Center's website has started adding the results of patient surveys to individual physician profiles, according to a report published by the medical center.

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STS Releases Outcomes for Congenital Heart Sx Database

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) has released the first publicly accessible report of surgical outcomes from its Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD).

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Estimates of Childhood ADHD Worldwide Differ Significantly

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 7 percent of children worldwide have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research concludes. The study was published online March 3 in Pediatrics.

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Acetaminophen Risks May Be Underestimated

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen may not be as safe as previously thought, with larger doses and long-term use linked to increased risk of health problems, a new report contends. The findings were published online March 2 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Severe Obesity in Youth Even Riskier Than Thought

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extremely obese children -- such as those at least 100 pounds overweight -- are in deeper trouble in terms of cardiovascular disease risks than doctors have thought, new research suggests. The study appears online March 2 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Research Measures Perceptions of Physician Compassion

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients prefer physicians who convey a more optimistic message, and perceive in them a higher level of compassion, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in JAMA Oncology.

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Tracking Growth Can Facilitate Earlier ID of Celiac in Children

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Growth monitoring programs may help identify children with celiac disease, according to a new study published in the March issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

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Majority of Doctors Yield to Parents' Vaccine Delay Requests

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors commonly get requests from parents to delay young children's vaccinations -- and often give in, according to the results of a new U.S. study. The findings, published online March 2 in Pediatrics, come at a time of rising concerns about "under-vaccination."

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Hospital Design Has Little Effect on Patient Satisfaction

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital design has little effect on patient satisfaction, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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