Lymphoma, Leukemia Survivors Have Increased Health Care Use

Share this content:
Lymphoma, Leukemia Survivors Have Increased Health Care Use
Lymphoma, Leukemia Survivors Have Increased Health Care Use

WEDNESDAY, May 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have increased use of health care services versus a normative population, according to a study published online April 26 in Cancer.

Lindy P.J. Arts, from the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation in Utrecht, and colleagues evaluated the use of medical and psychosocial care services among 1,444 survivors of lymphoma and CLL compared with a control population. Survivors completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaire and questions about health care, and their answers were compared with an age- and sex-matched normative population.

The researchers found that survivors of lymphoma and CLL contacted their general practitioner and medical specialist more often within the last year versus the control population. Survivors with psychological distress had even more medical contacts and received psychosocial care more often than nondistressed survivors. Greater use of medical services was tied to psychological distress, comorbidity, female sex, and older age. Younger age was associated with receiving psychosocial care.

"Further studies are needed to explore whether the use of widely applicable psychosocial interventions could reduce the frequency of medical contacts," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

'Aggressive Steps' Needed to Stop Adolescent Use of E-Cigarettes

'Aggressive Steps' Needed to Stop Adolescent Use of ...

U.S. Surgeon General issues a call to action for parents, teachers, and health professionals

Exercise Linked to Reduced Mortality for Patients With Cancer

Exercise Linked to Reduced Mortality for Patients With ...

Mortality rate lower for habitually active patients and for those who started exercising after diagnosis

Hospitalizations Up for Homeless From 2007 to 2013

Hospitalizations Up for Homeless From 2007 to 2013

Homeless individuals hospitalized more often for mental illness, substance use disorder

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »