Lower Energy Consumption for South Asian Migrants With T2DM

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Lower Energy Consumption for South Asian Migrants With T2DM
Lower Energy Consumption for South Asian Migrants With T2DM

FRIDAY, March 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Among South Asian (SA) migrants in the United States, those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) consume less total energy and have lower consumption of many nutrients than those without T2DM, according to a study published in the April issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.

Meena Shah, Ph.D., from the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues compared macro- and micronutrient intakes of SA migrants with and without T2DM. Using an image-assisted dietary assessment measure, 44 SA migrants with T2DM and 33 without T2DM reported their dietary intake.

The researchers found that SA migrants with T2DM consumed less total energy, linoleic acid, dietary fiber, vitamins A and E, calcium, magnesium, zinc, potassium, and β-carotene compared with controls. SA migrants with T2DM were significantly more likely not to meet the requirements for linoleic acid, dietary fiber, vitamin E, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and potassium compared with controls.

"SA [migrants] with T2DM, compared to controls, consume less total energy and have lower consumption of many nutrients associated with reduced risk of T2DM," the authors write. "Dietary interventions to reduce risk for T2DM are warranted in SA [migrants]."

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