January 2019 Briefing - Ophthalmology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for January 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Prophylaxis for Gonococcal Eye Infections in Newborns Advised

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has reaffirmed the recommendation for use of ocular prophylaxis for gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum. This recommendation forms the basis of a final recommendation statement published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Final Recommendation Statement
Evidence Review (subscription or payment may be required)

Americans Used Less Eye Care in 2014 Versus 2008

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Americans were less likely to use eye care in 2014 versus 2008 but had decreased difficulty affording eyeglasses from 2014 onward, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Report IDs Areas Lacking Good Practice in Health Tech Assessment

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a report published in the January issue of Value in Health, an ISPOR--The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research working group indicates the lack of good practices in three areas of health technology assessment (HTA).

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Down to 5 Weeks of Funding to Review New Drug Applications

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the federal government shutdown, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only about five weeks of funding left to review new drug applications, according to Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

CNN News Article

Adoption of Advanced Health IT Capabilities Inconsistent

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of advanced health information technology (HIT) capabilities is inconsistent across health care systems, with electronic health record (EHR) standardization being the strongest predictor of advanced capabilities, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

Abstract/Full Text

Study Explores Influence of Genetics, Environment in Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The influence of heritability and environmental factors has been identified for a large number of phenotypes, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nature Genetics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

American College of Physicians Releases 7th Edition of Ethics Manual

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ethical principles are discussed in an updated Ethics Manual, issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published as a supplement to the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

American College of Physicians Ethics Manual
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Statin Therapy Reduces Risk for Diabetic Retinopathy in T2DM

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia, statin therapy is associated with a reduced risk for diabetic retinopathy, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prices Still Explain High U.S. Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The difference in health spending between the United States and other countries is still explained by health care prices, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Private Equity Acquisition of Physician Practices Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The phenomenon of private equity acquisition of physician practices is discussed in an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Female Health Care Workers Live in Poverty

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. female health care workers, particularly women of color, live in poverty and lack health insurance, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increase in Brand-Name Drug Cost Mainly Due to Existing Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of oral and injectable brand-name drugs increased from 2008 to 2016, with most of the increase due to existing drugs, while new drugs accounted for cost increases in specialty and generic drugs, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Marketing Has Increased in Past 20 Years

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 through 2016, there was an increase in medical marketing, especially direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising, according to research published in the Jan. 1/8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editor's Note (subscription or payment may be required)

Cancer Death Rate in U.S. Decreased Continuously From 1991 to 2016

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The overall cancer death rate decreased continuously by 27 percent from 1991 to 2016, according to a report published online Jan. 8 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Abstract/Full Text

ACA Coverage Gains Could Erode Without Individual Mandate

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eliminating the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate penalty is unlikely to destabilize the individual market in California but could roll back coverage gains, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

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