January 2019 Briefing - Infectious Disease

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Infectious Disease for January 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Oral Antibiotics Noninferior to IV for Bone, Joint Infection

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients being treated for bone or joint infection, oral antibiotics are noninferior to intravenous antibiotics, according to a study published in the Jan. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Infective Endocarditis Related to Injection Drug Use Rising

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for infective endocarditis related to injection drug use increased from 2006 to 2015, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text

Hand Hygiene Compliance Low Among EMS Providers

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among emergency medical service (EMS) providers, compliance with hand hygiene (HH) is low, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Emergency Medical Journal.

Abstract/Full Text

Prophylaxis for Gonococcal Eye Infections in Newborns Advised

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has reaffirmed the recommendation for use of ocular prophylaxis for gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum. This recommendation forms the basis of a final recommendation statement published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Final Recommendation Statement
Evidence Review (subscription or payment may be required)

Public Health Interventions Could Cut Global Burden of Hepatitis C

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Public health interventions can go a long way toward meeting World Health Organization hepatitis C virus (HCV) targets, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in The Lancet.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Washington State Declares Health Emergency as Measles Spreads

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A statewide public health emergency was declared in Washington after a measles outbreak near Portland, Oregon, reached 31 cases on Friday. The outbreak in the Pacific Northwest is in what has been called an antivaccination "hot spot" in the United States, the Associated Press reported.

AP News Article

Direct-Acting Antivirals Not Tied to Liver Cancer Recurrence

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy is not associated with increased overall or early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence among patients with a previous complete response to HCC treatment, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Gastroenterology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Report IDs Areas Lacking Good Practice in Health Tech Assessment

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a report published in the January issue of Value in Health, an ISPOR--The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research working group indicates the lack of good practices in three areas of health technology assessment (HTA).

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Teens Not Up to Date on HPV Vaccination

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many adolescents do not complete human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination before turning 13 or 15 years old, according to a report published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Flu-Like Illness Tied to Increased Relative Mortality in ESRD

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Community activity for influenza-like illness (ILI) is associated with seasonal variation in all-cause mortality among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Proportion of Increased-Risk Deceased Organ Donors on Rise

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among deceased organ donors, there has been an increase in the proportion at increased risk for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HIV to recipients, according to research published in the Jan. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Measles Outbreak Prompts Public Emergency in Washington State

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An ongoing measles outbreak has led to a public health emergency being declared in Clark County, Washington.

CBS News Article

Herd Protection Seen With 4-Valent HPV Vaccination

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 2006 to 2017, there was a decrease in 4-valent vaccine-type human papillomavirus (HPV) detection among vaccinated and unvaccinated women, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Messages for Increasing Parental Confidence in HPV Vaccine ID'd

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Providing information on the benefits of vaccination, including cancer prevention, and avoiding expressing urgency to vaccinate can increase parent confidence in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text

Many New Cancer Patients Unaware of Their Hepatitis Status

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of patients with newly diagnosed cancer and concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are unaware of their viral infection at the time of cancer diagnosis, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in JAMA Oncology.

Abstract/Full Text

Inappropriate Antibiotic Rx Common in Privately Insured

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of all outpatient antibiotic prescription fills by privately insured nonelderly adults and children in the United States are appropriate or potentially appropriate, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in The BMJ.

Abstract/Full Text

WHO: Vaccine Hesitancy a Major Global Health Threat

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccine hesitancy is among the top 10 health threats facing the world in 2019, the World Health Organization says.

Newsweek Article
More Information: WHO

FDA Down to 5 Weeks of Funding to Review New Drug Applications

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the federal government shutdown, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only about five weeks of funding left to review new drug applications, according to Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

CNN News Article

Antibiotics Often Inappropriately Prescribed for Bronchiolitis in ED

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most children younger than 2 years with bronchiolitis seen in U.S. emergency departments and prescribed antibiotics have no documented bacterial coinfection, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

Abstract/Full Text

Nerve Transfer Promising for Acute Flaccid Myelitis Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis and upper-extremity neuropathy who were treated with peripheral nerve transfer continue to demonstrate functional recovery at two years, according to a case series recently published in Pediatric Neurology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adoption of Advanced Health IT Capabilities Inconsistent

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of advanced health information technology (HIT) capabilities is inconsistent across health care systems, with electronic health record (EHR) standardization being the strongest predictor of advanced capabilities, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

Abstract/Full Text

Review Shares Best Practices for Evaluating Penicillin Allergy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new review, published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, addresses best practices for the evaluation and management of reported penicillin allergies.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Congo Ebola Outbreak Now Second Worst in History

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There have been 600 confirmed cases of Ebola and 347 confirmed deaths since early August in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, making this outbreak of the disease the second largest and second deadliest in history.

ABC News Article
More Information: CDC

FDA to Resume Inspections of Riskier Foods

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Routine inspections of riskier foods will resume as early as today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

AP News Article

Study Explores Influence of Genetics, Environment in Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The influence of heritability and environmental factors has been identified for a large number of phenotypes, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nature Genetics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

American College of Physicians Releases 7th Edition of Ethics Manual

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ethical principles are discussed in an updated Ethics Manual, issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published as a supplement to the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

American College of Physicians Ethics Manual
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Doctor Released From Omaha Hospital After Ebola Monitoring

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An American doctor who was monitored for 21 days after possible Ebola exposure did not develop the deadly disease and has been released from the Nebraska Medicine-Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, officials say.

Press Release

Expanding Pharmacist Practice Scope Could Reduce ED Overcrowding

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of emergency department- or community-based pharmacists with an expanded scope of practice may cut emergency department overcrowding, according to a study recently published in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Flu Cases Hit 7 Million in the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The flu season is picking up steam, with about 7 million Americans having been struck by a strain of the flu virus, health officials said Friday.

More Information
FluView

Prices Still Explain High U.S. Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The difference in health spending between the United States and other countries is still explained by health care prices, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adverse Birth Outcomes Up for Women With H1N1 Flu in ICU

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with 2009 H1N1 influenza admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) have an increased risk for adverse birth outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Birth Defects Research.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Is Over

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The Escherichia coli outbreak linked to California-grown romaine lettuce appears to be over, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday.

More Information

FDA: Chocolates, Candies May Be Contaminated With Hepatitis A

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A public health alert about possible hepatitis A contamination in Modjeskas from Bauer's Candies was announced Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

U.S. Food Supply May Be at Risk Due to Government Shutdown

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Food inspections have declined due to the partial shutdown of the U.S. government, potentially putting the nation's food supply at risk.

CBS News Article

Private Equity Acquisition of Physician Practices Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The phenomenon of private equity acquisition of physician practices is discussed in an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Flu Vaccination Safe for Hospitalized Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination during hospitalization is associated with reduced risk for readmission, outpatient visits, fever, and clinical evaluations for infection postdischarge, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Measles Outbreak in New York State Largest in Recent History

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There have been at least 112 confirmed cases of measles in Rockland and Orange counties and at least 55 in New York City in what officials say is the largest measles outbreak in New York state in recent history.

CNN Article

Nine Cases of Wound Botulism ID'd in Injection Drug Users

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among persons who inject drugs, nine cases of wound botulism were identified in Southern California from September 2017 to April 2018, according to research published in the Jan. 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Many Female Health Care Workers Live in Poverty

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. female health care workers, particularly women of color, live in poverty and lack health insurance, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increase in Brand-Name Drug Cost Mainly Due to Existing Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of oral and injectable brand-name drugs increased from 2008 to 2016, with most of the increase due to existing drugs, while new drugs accounted for cost increases in specialty and generic drugs, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Marketing Has Increased in Past 20 Years

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 through 2016, there was an increase in medical marketing, especially direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising, according to research published in the Jan. 1/8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editor's Note (subscription or payment may be required)

USPSTF Affirms Guidance for Hep B Screening at First Prenatal Visit

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection screening in pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Jan. 8 by the task force.

Draft Recommendation Statement
Draft Evidence Review
Comment on Recommendation

Single-Family Rooms May Benefit Very Preterm Infants

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For extremely preterm infants, the use of single-family rooms is associated with reduced sepsis incidence and improvements in breastfeeding rates during hospital stays but with no difference in long-term neurodevelopment, according to a review published online Jan. 7 in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Antibiotics Prescribed for Children More Often at Nonpediatric EDs

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most emergency visits by children occur at nonpediatric emergency departments, which have more frequent antibiotic prescribing, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cervical Cancer Screening Rates 'Unacceptably Low'

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Less than two-thirds of eligible 30- to 65-year-old women are up to date with cervical cancer screening, and Pap completion rates have decreased over time, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Women's Health.

Abstract/Full Text

ACA Coverage Gains Could Erode Without Individual Mandate

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eliminating the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate penalty is unlikely to destabilize the individual market in California but could roll back coverage gains, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rx Opioids Up Pneumonia Risk in Patients With, Without HIV

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribed opioids are associated with an increased risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring hospitalization among persons with and without HIV, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Screening Donated Blood for Zika Not Cost-Effective

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Screening donated blood for Zika virus is cost-effective only in the high mosquito season in Puerto Rico, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Flu Vaccine Cuts Flu-Related Hospitalization in COPD Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) hospitalization, influenza vaccination is associated with a significant reduction in influenza-related hospitalization, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in CHEST.

Abstract/Full Text

Recent Nasal Preps Less Effective Than Injected Vax for Flu in Kids

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The quadrivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV4) is less effective than inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) against influenza A/H1N1pdm09 in all pediatric age groups, according to research published online Jan. 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

In-Hospital Morbidity, Mortality Up With Flu in Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure, influenza infection is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in JACC: Heart Failure.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Child Pneumonia Rate Dropped Globally From 2000 to 2015

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The global incidence of child pneumonia and related mortality decreased substantially from 2000 to 2015, consistent with decreases in the prevalence of some key risk factors, according to a study published in the January issue of The Lancet Global Health.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Partner-Delivered HIV Self-Testing Can Up Linkage to Care

WEDNESDAY, Jan, 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Partner-delivered HIV self-testing (HIVST) with financial incentives or reminders can increase the odds of male partners being linked to care or prevention, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in PLOS Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

U.S. Doctor Monitored for Ebola Exposure in Nebraska Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An American doctor is being treated at a Nebraska medical center for possible exposure to the Ebola virus while providing medical care in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is in the middle of an Ebola outbreak that has left more than 300 dead.

CBS News Article
More Information: CDC

College Students at Increased Risk for SgB Meningococcal Dz

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- College students have an increased risk for sporadic and outbreak-associated serogroup B meningococcal disease, according to a study published online Dec. 31 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

CDC: Progress in HIV Prevention Has Stalled in the United States

CDC: Progress in HIV Prevention Has Stalled in ...

Agency says effective HIV prevention, treatment not reaching those who could most benefit

AAAAI: Egg Oral Immunotherapy Shows Sustained Benefit in Children

AAAAI: Egg Oral Immunotherapy Shows Sustained Benefit in ...

All children with sustained unresponsiveness ingested concentrated and baked egg

Prenatal Vitamin Intake in Early Pregnancy May Cut Autism Risk

Prenatal Vitamin Intake in Early Pregnancy May Cut ...

ASD risk down for children whose mothers took prenatal vitamins during first month of pregnancy

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »