January 2019 Briefing - Cardiology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for January 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Long-Term Incidence of A-Fib Increased in Women With Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast cancer have an increased long-term incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online Jan. 28 in Heart Rhythm.

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Rising Temps May Up Burden of Congenital Heart Disease in U.S.

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Projected increases in maternal heat exposure may result in increased congenital heart defect (CHD) burden, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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AHA: Nearly Half of U.S. Adults Have Cardiovascular Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is 48.0 percent in adults in the United States based on 2013 to 2016 data, according to a report published online Jan. 31 in Circulation.

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Fruit, Vegetable Intake Very Low in Hemodialysis Population

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fruit and vegetable intake is very low in the hemodialysis population, with higher consumption associated with lower mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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E-Cigarettes More Effective for Smoking Cessation

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes are more effective for smoking cessation than nicotine replacement therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Meta-Analysis: Small Weight Increase Seen for Breakfast Eaters

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eating breakfast may not be a good strategy for weight loss, according to research published online Jan. 30 in The BMJ.

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Death at 10 Years Similar With Bilateral-, Single-Artery CABG

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is no difference in the rate of death from any cause at 10 years for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with bilateral or single internal-thoracic-artery grafting, according to a study published in the Jan. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Infective Endocarditis Related to Injection Drug Use Rising

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for infective endocarditis related to injection drug use increased from 2006 to 2015, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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FDA Receives an 'F' in Tobacco Prevention Report Card

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration was given an "F" in a new American Lung Association report card evaluating tobacco prevention programs.

CNN Article
State of Tobacco Control

Avoiding Full-Blown Diabetes Cuts Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Midlife increases in fasting glucose (FG) with conversion to diabetes are associated with higher cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, according to research published online Jan. 7 in Diabetes Care.

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Intensive BP Treatment Does Not Reduce Dementia Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Treating systolic blood pressure (BP) to a goal of less than 120 mm Hg rather than 140 mm Hg does not result in a significant reduction in the risk for probable dementia, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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NOACs Recommended as First-Line Prevention of Stroke in A-Fib

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with atrial fibrillation, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are recommended over warfarin to prevent stroke and weight loss is recommended for overweight and obese individuals, according to updated guidelines published online Jan. 28 in Circulation.

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MEESSI-Acute Heart Failure Risk Score Validated

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The Multiple Estimation of risk based on the Emergency department Spanish Score In patients with Acute Heart Failure (MEESSI-AHF) can accurately predict 30-day mortality in patients with AHF, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Financial Stress, Coronary Heart Disease Linked in African-Americans

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Financial stress may be associated with coronary heart disease among African-Americans, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Tachycardia May Indicate Higher Mortality Risk in Cancer Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with cancer, tachycardia can predict the risk for mortality, according to a study presented at the Advancing the Cardiovascular Care of the Oncology Patient conference organized by the American College of Cardiology and held from Jan. 25 to 27 in Washington, D.C.

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Paclitaxel Exposure in Vascular Device Not Linked to Mortality

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to paclitaxel in drug-coated balloons used in procedures for the treatment of symptomatic femoropopliteal peripheral arterial disease is not associated with mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Virtual Video Visits Liked by Patients, Providers

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Virtual video visits can effectively replace office visits for selected patients across medical specialties without sacrificing quality of care or patient-physician communication, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Assessment Tools Aid Risk Planning at Nursing Homes

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Better use of risk assessment tools, like the Changes in Health and End-stage disease Signs and Symptoms (CHESS) score, can help nursing homes identify which new residents are at risk for hospitalization or death within the first 90 days after admission, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.

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Report IDs Areas Lacking Good Practice in Health Tech Assessment

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a report published in the January issue of Value in Health, an ISPOR--The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research working group indicates the lack of good practices in three areas of health technology assessment (HTA).

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Home-Based Program Achieves Hypertension Control

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new home-based care delivery program can provide efficient and effective blood pressure (BP) control in individuals with hypertension, according to a study recently published in Clinical Cardiology.

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Fried Chicken, Fish Linked to All-Cause, Cardiovascular Death

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women, fried food consumption, especially fried chicken and fish/shellfish, is associated with an increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in The BMJ.

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CDC: Proportion of Increased-Risk Deceased Organ Donors on Rise

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among deceased organ donors, there has been an increase in the proportion at increased risk for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HIV to recipients, according to research published in the Jan. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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BP >120/80 mm Hg Linked to Lower Gray Matter Volume

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In young adults, lower gray matter volume (GMV) is seen in individuals with blood pressure (BP) >120/80 mm Hg, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Neurology.

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Smoking Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease in African-Americans

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking is associated with measures of subclinical peripheral artery disease (PAD) in African-Americans, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Meta-Analysis: Aspirin Linked to Lower Risk for CV Events in Primary Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals without cardiovascular disease, use of aspirin is associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular events and an increased risk for major bleeding, according to a meta-analysis published in the Jan. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Canadian Syncope Risk Score IDs ED Monitoring Time Postsyncope

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for arrhythmic conditions can be identified quickly among patients with syncope presenting to the emergency department, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in Circulation.

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Wait Times Have Improved in VA Health Care System

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 2014 to 2017, there were improvements in wait times in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system, resulting in reduced wait times versus the private sector (PS) in 2017, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in JAMA Network Open.

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FDA Investigating Paclitaxel-Coated Balloons, Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration alerted health care providers on Thursday that the agency is investigating the use of paclitaxel-coated balloons and paclitaxel-eluting stents to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the femoropopliteal artery because of a potentially increased mortality risk in the long term.

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Variation in Revascularization for Asymptomatic SIHD Unexplained

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For asymptomatic patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) and coronary artery disease (CAD), there is considerable variation in revascularization practice that is not explained by known factors, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis Tied to Increased Risk for Death

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA) is associated with an increased risk for mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and renal diseases, but self-reported OA is not, according to a study published in the December issue of the International Journal of Epidemiology.

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Sex Differences Seen in Pursuit of Interventional Cardiology Career

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Unique factors dissuade female fellows-in-training from pursuing a career in interventional cardiology (IC), according to a study published online Jan. 16 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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FDA Down to 5 Weeks of Funding to Review New Drug Applications

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the federal government shutdown, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only about five weeks of funding left to review new drug applications, according to Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

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Achieving Healthy Diet From Sustainable Food Feasible

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Achieving a healthy diet from sustainable food systems is feasible but will require considerable shifts toward healthy dietary patterns, according to a report from the EAT-Lancet Commission published online Jan. 16 by The Lancet.

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Risk for Uninsurance in AMI Patients Reduced With Medicaid Expansion

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid expansion was associated with a reduced risk for uninsurance among acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Coronary Artery Calcium May Help Predict CVD in South Asians

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence and progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in South Asians may be an important prognostic marker of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Adoption of Advanced Health IT Capabilities Inconsistent

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of advanced health information technology (HIT) capabilities is inconsistent across health care systems, with electronic health record (EHR) standardization being the strongest predictor of advanced capabilities, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Intermittent Fasts Plus Energy Restriction Best for Weight Loss

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Intermittent fasting with restricted energy intake may provide better outcomes than daily continuous diet restriction for health and weight loss in obese women, according to a study published in the January issue of Obesity.

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Replacing Sitting Time With Activity Lowers Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Replacing prolonged sedentary bouts with physical activity reduces mortality risk, but no benefit is seen for replacement with short sedentary bouts, according to a study recently published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Components of Ideal Cardio Health Cut Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with normal fasting glucose but not those with impaired fasting glucose (IFG), a higher number of ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) components correlates with a lower risk for diabetes, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Diabetologia.

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Study Explores Influence of Genetics, Environment in Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The influence of heritability and environmental factors has been identified for a large number of phenotypes, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nature Genetics.

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American College of Physicians Releases 7th Edition of Ethics Manual

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ethical principles are discussed in an updated Ethics Manual, issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published as a supplement to the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

American College of Physicians Ethics Manual
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Cardiometabolic Risk Up With Tourette, Chronic Tic Disorder

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) or chronic tic disorder (CTD) have an increased risk for developing at least one metabolic or cardiovascular disorder, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in JAMA Neurology.

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Short Sleep Duration Linked to Higher Atherosclerotic Burden

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep duration less than six hours and fragmented sleep are associated with atherosclerosis, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Terrorist Attack Victims With PTSD Have Higher Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), those who were victims of terrorist attacks (TA) have a higher risk for neoplasms than those who experience other traumatic events (OTE), according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Neuroscience Research.

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Moderate Drinking Linked to Electroanatomic Changes in A-Fib

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower atrial voltage and conduction slowing in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Heart Rhythm.

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High Fiber Intake Tied to Lower Risk for Noncommunicable Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of fiber is associated with a reduced risk for several noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), according to research published online Jan. 10 in the The Lancet.

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Statin Therapy Reduces Risk for Diabetic Retinopathy in T2DM

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia, statin therapy is associated with a reduced risk for diabetic retinopathy, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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Artificial Intelligence Can Use Routine ECGs to ID Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence (AI) can identify asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (ALVD) using results from a routine electrocardiogram (ECG), according to a research letter published online Jan. 7 in Nature Medicine.

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Prices Still Explain High U.S. Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The difference in health spending between the United States and other countries is still explained by health care prices, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Outcomes Poorer for Medicaid Beneficiaries With STEMI

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), Medicaid beneficiaries have lower rates of revascularization and higher in-hospital mortality than patients with private insurance, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Private Equity Acquisition of Physician Practices Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The phenomenon of private equity acquisition of physician practices is discussed in an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Transdermal HRT Not Linked to Increased Risk for VTE

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Oral hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), while transdermal preparations are not linked to increased risk, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in the BMJ.

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No Increased Fall Risk With HTN Treatment in Older Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Treating high blood pressure (BP) is not associated with an increased fall risk among older women, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Many Female Health Care Workers Live in Poverty

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. female health care workers, particularly women of color, live in poverty and lack health insurance, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Increase in Brand-Name Drug Cost Mainly Due to Existing Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of oral and injectable brand-name drugs increased from 2008 to 2016, with most of the increase due to existing drugs, while new drugs accounted for cost increases in specialty and generic drugs, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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IC Nicardipine Promising for Tx of Spontaneous Coronary Slow-Flow

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Intracoronary (IC) administration of nicardipine seems to be highly effective in reversing spontaneous coronary slow-flow (CSF), according to a study published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of Invasive Cardiology.

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Medical Marketing Has Increased in Past 20 Years

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 through 2016, there was an increase in medical marketing, especially direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising, according to research published in the Jan. 1/8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Costs Higher for Those With Comorbid Noncommunicable Diseases

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of having two noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is generally superadditive, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in PLOS Medicine.

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Feeling Life Is Worthwhile Linked to Healthier Aging

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The feeling that life is filled with worthwhile activities may promote healthier aging and help sustain meaningful relationships, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Women With CVD Have Worse Self-Reported Outcomes

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with men, women with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) are more likely to report poorer patient experience, lower health-related quality of life, and poorer perception of their health, according to a study recently published online in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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ACA Coverage Gains Could Erode Without Individual Mandate

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eliminating the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate penalty is unlikely to destabilize the individual market in California but could roll back coverage gains, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Employment, Earning Losses Noted After Cardiovascular Events

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac arrest, and stroke are associated with substantial loss in employment and earnings at three years postevent, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Exercise Can Consistently Lower Blood Pressure

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise can consistently yield reductions in blood pressure, according to a meta-analysis published online Dec. 18 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Income Volatility Linked to CVD, All-Cause Mortality

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Income volatility and drops in income during formative earning years are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in Circulation.

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Risk for MCI Up With Progressive Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with hypertension with progression of periventricular white matter hyperintensities have an increased risk for incident mild cognitive impairment, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in Hypertension.

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Health Benefits of Nonsugar Sweeteners Uncertain

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is no compelling evidence to indicate health benefits of nonsugar sweetener (NSS) use on a range of health outcomes, according to a review published online Jan. 2 in The BMJ.

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In-Hospital Morbidity, Mortality Up With Flu in Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure, influenza infection is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in JACC: Heart Failure.

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Applying Population Health Data IDs Patients at Risk for CVD

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Population-level data can help medical practitioners use electronic health records to identify patients at risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Hypertension With Psoriasis Tied to More Cardiac Interventions

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular interventions in patients with hypertension, according to a study published in the December issue of The Journal of Dermatology.

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Moderate Drinking Not Harmful for Seniors With Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with heart failure, limited alcohol consumption after diagnosis is associated with survival benefit versus long-term abstinence, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in JAMA Network Open.

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Volumes Low for Unprotected Left Main PCI

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Unprotected left main (ULM) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures represented less than 1 percent of all PCIs in clinical practice in the United States from 2009 through 2016, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Price of Alirocumab Would Have to Be Cut to Be Cost-Effective

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome receiving a statin, the price of alirocumab would have to be reduced to be cost-effective, according to a study published online Jan. 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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