January 2015 Briefing - Emergency Medicine

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for January 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cardiovascular, Cerebral Effect for Red Bull + Mental Stress

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Red Bull consumption combined with mental stress correlates with increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Topical Acne Gel Linked to Methemoglobinemia

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of topical dapsone may have led to the development of methemoglobinemia, according to a case study published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CDC: Measles Cases in January Top Typical Load for Entire Year

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The United States has seen more cases of measles in January than it usually does in an entire year, federal health officials said Thursday.

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Hepatitis A Hospitalizations Down From 2002 to 2011

THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2011 there was a decrease in the rate of hospitalizations for hepatitis A, according to a study published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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FDA to Strengthen Approval Process for AEDs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Automated external defibrillators installed and ready for use in many public spaces can save lives when needed, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that since 2005, it has also received 72,000 reports of the devices failing.

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Benefits Package Important for Attracting, Retaining Staff

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An appropriately-targeted benefits package is crucial for attracting and retaining employees, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Sedation Protocol Doesn't Reduce Duration of Ventilation in PICU

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure, the use of a sedation protocol does not reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Benefit of Noninvasive Tests in Non-MI Chest Pain Questioned

TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients seen in emergency departments solely for chest pain not due to myocardial infarction, noninvasive screening tests for coronary heart disease do not appear to benefit the prediction of future cardiovascular events, a new study suggests. The report was published online Jan. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Early Alert Intervention Cuts Heart Failure Readmission

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic medical record system, designed to identify patients who have been discharged from heart failure hospitalization and present in the emergency department, can prevent readmissions, according to a study published in The American Journal of Medicine.

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5 Percent of Seniors Discharged From ER Admitted Within Days

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 5 percent of older Medicare beneficiaries seen in the emergency department have a hospital inpatient admission within seven days after discharge, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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More Variation in Costs Than Outcomes of PCI in VA System

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system, the variation in one-year risk-adjusted mortality is smaller than variation in risk-standardized costs, according to a study published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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May Be Room for Improvement in U/S Transducer Hygiene

FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For endoluminal procedures relying on barrier protection to avoid contamination, permeability of materials may not always be considered, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.

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Very Low Yield for Imaging of Both Legs in Suspected DVT

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT), systematic imaging of both legs has a very low yield, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Physicians Rank the Best EHR Systems of 2014

THURSDAY, Jan. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have ranked electronic health record (EHR) systems based on five key performance areas, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Incidence of PE Hospitalizations Rises From 2001 to 2010

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of hospitalizations for pulmonary embolism (PE) increased from 2001 to 2010, and a pattern of seasonal variation can be seen in PE hospitalizations, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Collaboration Between Med Students Cuts Diagnostic Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For fourth-year medical students, working collaboratively is associated with a reduction in diagnostic errors, according to a research letter published in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AHS: Research Informs New Migraine Rx Guidelines

TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have reviewed recent scientific literature and concluded that a number of classes of drugs are effective for treating acute migraine. The study, published in the January issue of Headache, will form the basis of new American Headache Society guidelines for the treatment of migraine.

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Most Docs Work 40 to 60 Hours Per Week

FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians work long hours, with most working 40 to 60 hours per week and a considerable proportion working 61 to 80 or more hours per week, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Epidemic of Rx Opioid Abuse May Be Waning in U.S.

THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. epidemic of prescription opioid medication abuse may be starting to reverse course, according to new research. The findings, published in the Jan. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, suggest that recent laws and prescribing guidelines aimed at preventing abuse are working to some degree.

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Working Long Hours? Beware Risky Alcohol Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. The report was published online Jan. 13 in The BMJ.

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Rationale for Overriding Best Practice Alerts Highly Diverse

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A wide range of physician-reported rationales drive overrides of best practice alerts (BPAs) for blood product transfusions, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Study Examines Trends in Tracheotomy Malpractice Suits

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Malpractice litigation relating to complications from tracheotomies can result in high award amounts, especially in pediatric cases, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in Head & Neck.

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No Negative Consequences of Guidelines for Antibiotic Therapy

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), there are no negative consequences associated with use of guideline-recommended antibiotic therapy, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Guidelines Presented for Clinical Documentation in 21st Century

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines have been developed for clinical documentation and interrelated issues. The position paper has been published online Jan. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Clinicians Increasingly Ordering Imaging for Headaches

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians are increasingly ordering advanced imaging and referring to other physicians for headache but less often providing counseling, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Caustic Ingestion Can Be Mistaken for Anaphylaxis

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children presenting with an unclear history, caustic ingestion (CI) can be mistaken for anaphylaxis due to similarity of symptoms, according to two case reports published online Jan. 12 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Urging Flu Vaccination, Prompt Use of Antivirals

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Thousands of people are being hospitalized and 26 children have died from influenza so far, Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said during a Friday press briefing.

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Disney-Related Measles Outbreak Now Includes 3 States

MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A measles outbreak linked to Disney theme parks in California included 19 people in three states as of Friday, according to health officials.

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

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CDC: Occupationally Acquired HIV Now Rare

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Documented occupational acquisition of HIV has now become rare in the United States, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Glucose Level in ER Could Aid Heart Failure Prognosis

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The measurement of blood glucose levels in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute heart failure could provide useful prognostic information and help improve outcomes in these patients, according to new research published online Jan. 8 in the European Heart Journal.

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Binocular Vision Disorders Up High Morbidity Injuries in Seniors

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older Medicare beneficiaries, having a disorder of binocular vision is associated with increased odds of musculoskeletal injury, fracture, and fall, according to a study published in the January issue of JAMA Ophthalmology.

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California Measles Cases Linked to Disney Park Visits

THURSDAY, Jan. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seven people in California and two in Utah with confirmed cases of measles likely contracted the illness during visits to Disney theme parks in December, according to California health officials.

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Experts Discuss Pros and Cons of Maintenance of Certification

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The pros and cons of the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) are discussed in two articles published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Rotating Shift Work May Be Hazardous to Health

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working rotating night shifts (at least three nights spent working each month, in addition to days and evenings worked in the month) may pose a threat to an individual's health, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Jan. 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Article Highlights Top Technology Challenges for 2015

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) audits, meaningful use 2, and the burdens of technology are the top four technological challenges for physicians in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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'July Effect' Has No Impact on Quality of Care in Stroke

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers investigating the so-called "July effect" found that when recent medical school graduates begin their residency programs every summer in teaching hospitals, this transition doesn't reduce the quality of care for patients presenting with ischemic stroke.

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CDC: Outpatient Visits for Flu-Like Symptoms Up

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The current flu season, already off to a rough start, continues to get worse, with 43 states now reporting widespread flu activity and 21 child deaths so far, U.S. health officials said Monday.

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For ER Patients, Self-Reported Drug Ingestion History Poor

TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients presenting to the emergency department, self-reported drug ingestion histories are poor when confirmed by urine comprehensive drug screen (CDS), according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Article Highlights Top Management Challenges for 2015

MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable challenges are projected to impact practice management in 2015, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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