Foley Catheter Plus Oxytocin Does Not Speed Delivery

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Foley Catheter Plus Oxytocin Does Not Speed Delivery
Foley Catheter Plus Oxytocin Does Not Speed Delivery

THURSDAY, Dec. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a transcervical Foley catheter plus oxytocin does not shorten the time to delivery in women with prelabor rupture of membranes compared with oxytocin alone, according to a study published online Dec. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

A. Dhanya Mackeen, M.D., M.P.H., from Geisinger in Danville, Pennsylvania, and colleagues randomly assigned women at 34 weeks of gestation or greater with prelabor rupture of membranes to a transcervical Foley catheter inflated to 30 cc with concurrent oxytocin infusion (n = 93) or oxytocin infusion alone (n = 108) for labor induction and cervical ripening.

The researchers found that time to delivery was similar between the groups (13.9 hours in the Foley group versus 14.4 hours in the oxytocin group (P = 0.69). There were more cases of clinical chorioamnionitis in the Foley group compared with the oxytocin group (8 percent versus 0 percent; P < 0.01). All other outcomes, including other infectious morbidities, were similar between the groups.

"In patients with prelabor rupture of membranes, the use of a transcervical Foley catheter in addition to oxytocin does not shorten the time to delivery compared with oxytocin alone, but may increase the incidence of intra-amniotic infection," conclude the authors.

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