First U.S. Case of Locally Acquired Zika Described

Share this content:
First U.S. Case of Locally Acquired Zika Described
First U.S. Case of Locally Acquired Zika Described

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a case study from the University of Miami, and published online Jan. 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine, doctors provide new insight into the Zika virus, showing fetal exposure doesn't necessarily mean infection.

The case began last July. In the 23rd week of pregnancy, the 23-year-old Florida woman developed a fever, widespread pruritic rash, and sore throat followed by muscle and joint pain. Blood tests confirmed she had Zika.

Although her blood tested positive for Zika for six weeks, her pregnancy proceeded normally, according to the authors. Ultrasound examination showed no fetal brain abnormalities. The infant -- born full-term in October -- showed none of the birth defects linked to Zika.

"This case has been confirmed by the Miami-Dade County Department of Health as the first non-travel-associated case of Zika virus infection in the United States," the authors write. "Medical providers on the front line should be aware of the constellation of symptoms in patients reporting travel to endemic areas, including areas in southern Florida, where other non-travel-associated cases have been confirmed."

Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

60 Percent of Adults Report Adverse Childhood Experiences

>60 Percent of Adults Report Adverse Childhood Experiences

Higher ACE exposures for black, Hispanic, multiracial individuals, those with below high school education

Few Yogurt Products Qualify As Low-Sugar

Few Yogurt Products Qualify As Low-Sugar

Only two of 101 children's yogurt and fromage frais products had ≤5 g sugar/100 g of product

Allopurinol Dose Escalation for Gout Doesn't Improve Mortality

Allopurinol Dose Escalation for Gout Doesn't Improve Mortality

Linked to small increase in mortality; at 2 years, 31 percent of dose escalators achieved serum urate goal

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »