February 2018 Briefing - Pain Management

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pain Management for February 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Early Studies Often Show Exaggerated Treatment Effect

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Trials to evaluate drugs or devices used to treat chronic medical conditions that are published early in the chain of evidence often show an exaggerated treatment effect compared with subsequent trials, according to research published online Feb. 21 in the Mayo Clinical Proceedings.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Low Risk of Serotonin Syndrome for Triptans + SSRI/SNRI

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A low risk of serotonin syndrome is seen in association with concomitant use of triptans and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressants, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in JAMA Neurology.

Abstract/Full Text

Recommendations for Optimizing Hidden Curriculum in Medicine

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians (ACP) presents recommendations for optimizing clinical learning environments by fostering a positive hidden curriculum in medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Understanding Rx Nonadherence Can Improve Adherence

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Understanding nonadherence in patients and encouraging a change in attitude toward patients and their medication can improve medication adherence, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Group CBT, Pain Education Improve Pain, Physical Function

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic pain, literacy-adapted group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and group pain education (EDU) improve pain and physical function compared with usual care, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Knee Pain, Functional Impairment Associated With Depression

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Knee pain and functional impairments in elderly individuals are associated with the development of depressive symptoms, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Artificial Intelligence May Help Prevent Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Feb. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence (AI), in which computers can be trained to recognize patterns in large quantities of data, may be able to reduce physicians' burdens, saving them time and energy, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

More Information

CDC: No Change in Percentage of Uninsured in U.S. From '16 to '17

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of uninsured U.S. persons of all ages did not change significantly from 2016 to the first nine months of 2017, according to a report published online Feb. 22 by the National Center for Health Statistics.

Abstract/Full Text

Chronic Opioid Users May Wish to Taper Opioid Use

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with non-cancer-related chronic pain prescribed long-term opioids may wish to taper their opioid use, according to a research letter published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Hydroxychloroquine No Better Than Placebo for Hand OA

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with moderate-to-severe hand pain and radiographic osteoarthritis, hydroxychloroquine is no more effective than placebo for relieving pain, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Burnout Found Prevalent Among Doctors in Single Health System

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout is prevalent among physicians, affecting over one-third of physicians in a single health system, and is associated with health care delivery, according to a research letter published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Want Physicians to Have Greater Connectivity

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients want greater connectivity, online tools and text messaging, as well as more time with their physicians, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Opioids Plus Acetaminophen, Ketorolac Cost-Effective Post-Sx

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous acetaminophen with or without ketorolac is associated with reduced opioid consumption and cost of care after scoliosis surgery in adolescents, compared with opioids alone, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Four Best Practices Outlined to Prevent Health Care Cyberattacks

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Four best practices outlined that can help prevent health care cyberattacks, which increased from 2016 to 2017, according to a report published in Managed Healthcare Executive.

Abstract/Full Text

Treating Depression Found to Up Successful Opioid Cessation

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Antidepressant medication (ADM) adherence is associated with cessation of long-term prescription opioid use among patients with non-cancer pain, according to a study published in the February issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract/Full Text

Limited Evidence for Effect of Cranial Electrical Stimulation

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence for the effectiveness of cranial electrical stimulation (CES) is sparse, according to a review published online Feb. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

EHRs Not Sufficient to Ensure Success in Value-Based Care

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) are not sufficient to ensure success in value-based care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Top Consumer Concerns Reported About Physicians

FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Health care consumers have four major concerns regarding their physicians, according to a report published by Managed Healthcare Executive.

More Information

Poll: Personal Beliefs Shouldn't Allow Doctors to Refuse to Treat

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most people do not believe that professionals including health care providers should be allowed to refuse to provide services based on their conscience or beliefs, according to a recent HealthDay/The Harris Poll.

More Information

Opioid Prescribing Trends in the VA Similar to Other Settings

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid prescribing trends in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) from 2010 to 2016 followed similar trajectories as non-VHA settings, peaking around 2012 then declining, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Humanities Exposure Positively Impacts Medical Students

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the humanities correlates with less burnout and higher levels of positive personal qualities among medical students, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Factors Identified That Impact Physicians IT Adoption

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have considerable concerns about the efficacy and evidence base of health information technology (IT), according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Poor Sleep Worsens Link Between PTSD, Chronic Pain in Youth

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poor sleep worsens the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and chronic pain in youth, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medicaid Expansion Cuts Out-of-Pocket Spending

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- States that expanded Medicaid cut the probability of non-elderly near-poor adults being uninsured and lowered average out-of-pocket spending, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

NSAID Users Commonly Exceed Daily Limit

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The number of users who exceed the daily limit of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is "nontrivial," according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Persistent Pain Common 1 Month After Elective Pediatric Surgery

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many pediatric patients have persistent pain after common ambulatory surgeries, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

NIH Panel Will No Longer Review Gene Therapy Experiments

NIH Panel Will No Longer Review Gene Therapy ...

FDA will now assess gene therapy experiments and products as it does with other treatments, drugs

Doctors Remove Contact Lens Embedded in Eyelid for Years

Doctors Remove Contact Lens Embedded in Eyelid for ...

Lens was encapsulated within the upper eyelid soft tissue since childhood eye trauma

CDC: Brucellosis in Dogs Remains a Public Health Risk

CDC: Brucellosis in Dogs Remains a Public Health ...

Infection is under-recognized, may remain a threat without stronger intervention measures

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »