February 2015 Briefing - Pharmacy

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pharmacy for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Oral Bisphosphonate Use Tied to Lower Endometrial Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women, oral bisphosphonate use is associated with a reduction in the risk of endometrial cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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No Response to Statin May Mean More Rapid Atheroma Progression

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty percent of people with coronary artery disease experience little or no reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from statin treatment, according to research published online Feb. 26 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Stress Ups Risk of Peptic Ulcer Regardless of H. Pylori Status

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological stress correlates with increased risk of peptic ulcer, with similar effects associated with Helicobacter pylori infection and ulcers unrelated to either H. pylori or use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Circadian Clock Has Significant Impact on Allergic Reaction

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The circadian clock seems to have a significant impact on allergic reaction, according to a review published online Feb. 17 in Allergy.

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FDA Approves New Combination Antibiotic Avycaz

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The combination antibiotic Avycaz (ceftazidime-avibactam) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with complicated infections of the intra-abdominal area or urinary tract, including the kidneys.

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Researchers Examine Etiology of Ibrutinib Discontinuation in CLL

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib is effective, and prognosis is poor after discontinuation, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in JAMA Oncology. The research identifies, for the first time, baseline factors associated with ibrutinib therapy discontinuation.

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Use of Injected Opioid Tied to HIV Outbreak in Indiana

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Addicts' use of a powerful painkiller is driving a large HIV outbreak in Indiana, according to health officials.

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Incidence of Viral Pneumonia Up in Young Children

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young children are at increased risk of becoming seriously ill with pneumonia -- but unlike in years past, the cause is usually a respiratory virus, according to a study published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CBT, Sertraline Insufficient in Diabetes and Depression

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic control remains unchanged with both treatments, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Longer Needles Recommended for Epinephrine Autoinjectors

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given the increasing epidemic of obesity, epinephrine autoinjectors (EAIs) for anaphylaxis require longer needles to ensure intramuscular injection, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Allergy.

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Six-Month Dual Antiplatelet Tx Noninferior to 24-Month DAPT

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For aspirin-sensitive patients undergoing everolimus-eluting stent implantation, six-month dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is noninferior to 24-month DAPT, according to a study published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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SNP Linked to Vincristine-Related Neuropathy in ALL

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter region of the CEP72 gene, which encodes a centrosomal protein involved in microtubule formation, correlates with risk and severity of vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to a study published in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Even Short Term Use of NSAID With Anticoagulant Ill Advised

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) may raise the risk for myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and/or serious bleeding among MI survivors taking prescription anticoagulants, with no safe window period, according to new research. Bleeding risk rose even within the first three days of NSAID use, the team noted in a study published in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Approves Farydak for Multiple Myeloma

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Farydak (panobinostat) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat multiple myeloma. Farydak inhibits the activity of histone deacetylases, which could slow the overproduction of plasma cells among people with multiple myeloma, the FDA said.

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CDC: Use of Long-Acting Birth Control on Rise in U.S.

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of long-acting birth control methods such as intrauterine devices or contraceptive implants jumped five-fold between 2002 and 2011, according to a report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics as a February data brief.

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SVR Rates Up With New Regimens for HCV and HIV Coinfection

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and HIV coinfection, new regimens are effective and correlate with high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) after treatment, according to two studies published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Centralized Reminder System Could Increase Vaccination Rates

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A centralized statewide reminder system for immunizations may be a more reliable way to increase overall vaccination rates than reminders from a doctor's office, according to a report published online Feb. 23 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Undiagnosed/Untreated HIV Implicated in Most New Cases

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Undiagnosed and untreated people with HIV may be responsible for more than nine out of 10 new infections, according to research published online Feb. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Not Linked to Cardiac Arrhythmia

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In critically ill patients, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is not associated with cardiac arrhythmia, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Noncancer Pain Patients Commonly Use Benzodiazepines

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) patients who use benzodiazepines (BZDs) daily frequently have multiple comorbid mental health conditions and higher rates of emergency health care use, according to a study published in the February issue of Pain Medicine.

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Salicylates Reduce Metabolic Clearance of Insulin

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Salsalate increases insulin concentrations by decreasing metabolic clearance of insulin (MCI), not by increasing insulin secretion, according to research published online Feb. 13 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Research Finds No Cancer Link With Pimecrolimus

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pimecrolimus (Elidel) cream used to treat eczema in children does not appear to increase the risk of cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Varicella Zoster Linked to Giant Cell Arteritis

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research links the varicella zoster virus to giant cell arteritis. The study was published online Feb. 18 in Neurology.

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'Remission' Replaces 'Functional Cure' in HIV Case

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All babies born with HIV should receive the same rapid medical response as the young Mississippi girl born with the virus who suffered a disappointing relapse last July, despite the fact that the virus later reappeared, according to a letter published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Propranolol Effective for Infantile Hemangioma

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Propranolol (Inderal) appears to be effective in treating infantile hemangiomas, according to research published in the Feb. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Three Meds for Diabetic Macular Edema Compared

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research compared three leading drugs for diabetic macular edema -- bevacizumab (Avastin), aflibercept (Eylea), and ranibizumab (Lucentis) -- and although aflibercept came out on top, all were effective options. The study was published online Feb. 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Cost-Effectiveness of Immediate HCV Rx in Early Disease Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), immediate treatment seems to be cost-effective in those with moderate and advanced fibrosis, and can be cost-effective in patients with no or minimal fibrosis, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in Hepatology.

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Varenicline May Help Smokers Not Yet Ready to Quit

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Varenicline (Chantix) can boost the likelihood that cigarette smokers who aren't ready to stop cold turkey will cut down gradually, a new study suggests. The research appears in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Can Offer Cross-Protection Against H7N9

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal influenza vaccines trigger immune system protection against the H7N9 influenza virus, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Methylprednisolone Use Cuts Treatment Failure in Pneumonia

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia and high initial inflammatory response, methylprednisolone use is associated with decreased treatment failure, according to a study published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Eliglustat Safely Reverses Manifestations of Gaucher's

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A novel oral substrate reduction therapy, eliglustat, can safely reverse clinical manifestations in untreated adults with Gaucher's disease type 1, according to a study published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fondaparinux Found to Effectively Treat NSTEMI

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a new study, patients who received fondaparinux to treat non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) had a lower risk of major bleeding and death compared to patients who received low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). The findings were published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Young Adult Sore Throat Could Be Due to F. Necrophorum

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fusobacterium necrophorum is responsible for one in five sore throats in young adults, a new study suggests. The report was published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Contraceptive Patch, Implant Not Tied to Endothelial Activation

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cutaneous and subdermal hormonal contraceptives do not induce endothelial activation after four months of use, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Antiviral Tx Improves Survival in Sorafenib-Treated HBV-HCC

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For sorafenib-treated patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-related HCC), antiviral therapy with nucleoside analogues (NAs) is associated with improved survival, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Wide Variation in Hospital Tx Patterns for Metastatic CRC

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), there is wide variation in hospital treatment patterns, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Cancer.

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Certain Macrolides Linked With Higher Risk of Pyloric Stenosis

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research supports previous findings that erythromycin can increase the risk of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS). The research also indicates that azithromycin is associated with a higher risk of IHPS when given to infants under 6 weeks old. The findings were published online Feb. 16 in the Pediatrics.

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Medical Journals Should Not Be Swayed by Fear of Libel Lawsuits

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of corporate defamation lawsuits should not prevent medical journals from investigating corporate products, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 16 in Pediatrics.

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Antipsychotic Rx Often Relates to Non-Approved Indications

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with dementia living in nursing homes, the provider's rationale for use of antipsychotic drug therapy frequently relates to indications for which these drugs are not approved, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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FDA Approves Lenvima for Type of Thyroid Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The kinase inhibitor Lenvima (lenvatinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat differentiated thyroid cancer that has progressed despite radioactive iodine therapy, the agency said Friday in a news release.

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HRT Use, Even Short Term, Tied to Higher Risk of Ovarian CA

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who use hormone therapy after menopause -- even for just a few years -- may have an increased risk of ovarian cancer, according to new research. The meta-analysis was published online Feb. 12 in The Lancet.

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Osteoporosis-Treated Adults Have Elevated Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women and men below age 70 who are treated for osteoporosis have an excess mortality risk, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Intervention Cuts Drug Prep Errors for Peroral Drugs

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed intervention program tailored to hospitals can reduce the rate of inappropriately prepared solid peroral drugs for patients with feeding tubes, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Lenvatinib Delays Progression in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Oral lenvatinib delayed progression of advanced thyroid cancer by 18 months, compared with four months for patients treated with a placebo, according to results from a new clinical trial. Results of the study were published in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Specific NSAIDs Increase Nonfatal Ischemic Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of specific nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac and aceclofenac, is associated with increased risk of nonfatal ischemic stroke, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Human Breast Milk Effective for Infants With Atopic Dermatitis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For infants with atopic dermatitis, topical application of human breast milk has the same efficacy as hydrocortisone 1 percent ointment, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in the International Journal of Dermatology.

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AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As part of American Heart Month, physicians are encouraged to focus on patients' blood pressure, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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Findings Do Not Support Creatine for Parkinson's Rx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Creatine monohydrate doesn't appear to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, according to research published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Iron Supplements Speed Blood Donation Recovery

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose iron supplements speed blood donors' recovery of iron and hemoglobin, new research shows. The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-funded study was published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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BP Meds Benefit Diabetes Patients, Even Without HTN

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis indicates that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to suffer myocardial infarctions, strokes, or early mortality when they take blood pressure medications -- even if they don't actually have hypertension. The study was published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Multidisciplinary Approach Successful in Chronic Back Pain

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medication combined with a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program can decrease disability and improve mental health in low back pain patients over several years, according to a study published online Dec. 26 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Oxytocin in Labor Not Linked With Later ADHD in Child

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Augmentation of labor with the medication oxytocin does not seem to raise the risk of having a child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

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HPV Vaccination Does Not Seem to Promote Unsafe Sex in Teens

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Getting vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV) does not appear to increase unsafe sexual practices among teen girls, according to a new study published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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AMA Provides Key Messages for Patients About Vaccination

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should be prepared for questions about the safety of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA). The AMA has offered advice for answering patient questions on vaccination.

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Some Angiotensin Receptor Blockers More Potent Than Others

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Different angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have distinct potencies for suppressing adrenal β-arrestin1 (βarr1)-dependent post-myocardial infarction (MI) hyperaldosteronism, according to a letter published in the Dec. 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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FDA Expands Approval of Lucentis for Diabetic Retinopathy

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded the approved use for Lucentis (ranibizumab injection) 0.3 mg to treat diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetic macular edema.

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Resting-State Connectivity Predicts Psychotherapy Response

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Resting-state functional brain connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) can predict response to psychotherapy in major depressive disorder (MDD), according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Review: Some Nonpharmacologic Tx Effective in Peds GI Disorders

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain nonpharmacologic treatments are effective in pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs), according to a review published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Implant, Hormonal IUD Effective Beyond FDA-Approved Duration

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The contraceptive implant and the 52-mg hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) seem to be effective beyond the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved duration, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Prehospital Magnesium Sulfate Doesn't Benefit Stroke Outcomes

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with suspected stroke, prehospital magnesium sulfate therapy is safe but does not impact the degree of disability at 90 days, according to a study published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Contraception Info Given With Isotretinoin Rx Ups Safe Use

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say giving birth control information to women visiting dermatology clinics can help promote the safe use of isotretinoin. The study was published online Feb. 4 in JAMA Dermatology.

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FDA Approves Ibrance to Treat Advanced Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ibrance (palbociclib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced breast cancer among postmenopausal women.

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Debunking Contraception Myths to Reduce Unintended Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If more women had access to modern birth control methods and used them correctly, there would be 15 million fewer unwanted pregnancies in low- and middle-income nations each year, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in Human Reproduction.

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One in Three Prefer Earlier Death to Daily Pill

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One out of three adults would sooner face a shorter life span than take a daily pill to prevent cardiovascular disease, according to a new Internet survey published online Feb. 3 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Flu Vaccination Rates for Nursing Home Staff Too Low

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one in two U.S. nursing home workers receive an annual flu vaccination, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Review: Hormonal Rx Not Indicated As Acne Monotherapy

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hormonal therapy is recommended for treatment of acne in patients who do not respond to standard therapies, according to a review published online Jan. 27 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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'Battlefield' Blood Transfusion Deemed More Beneficial

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A blood transfusion containing equal parts plasma, platelets, and red blood cells is the most effective treatment for someone who is in immediate danger of exsanguination, compared to a blood mix containing a larger amount of red blood cells, according to research published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Younger Patients With Diabetes More Often Skipping Visits

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One in every five young American adults with diabetes hasn't seen a doctor in the past six months, according to a February data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Two Pneumococcal Vaccines Advised for Seniors

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults 65 and older need two pneumococcal vaccines to better protect them from sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia, according to a revised vaccination schedule from the 2015 Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The new recommendations were published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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New Guidelines Issued for Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For the one in six Americans with allergic rhinitis, new treatment guidelines have been issued by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. The recommendations for those ages 2 and up appear in the February issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

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Guidelines for VTE Prophylaxis, Treatment in Cancer Unchanged

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The 2014 recommendations for the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer are unchanged from 2013, according to an article published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Nutritional Supplements Can Improve Pressure Ulcer Healing

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For malnourished adult patients, specific nutritional supplements (arginine, zinc, and antioxidants) are associated with improved pressure ulcer healing, according to a study published in the Feb. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Too Many Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients on IV Fluids

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Potentially harmful intravenous (IV) fluids are being given to too many patients with severe heart failure, according to a new study published in the Feb. 1 issue of JACC: Heart Failure.

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Non-Pharmacological Options Efficacious in Treating Delirium

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Non-pharmacological alternatives for the treatment of delirium are available and beneficial, according to a review published online Feb. 2 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Spironolactone + TMP-SMX May Up Risk of Sudden Death

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking spironolactone alongside the antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole can cause blood potassium to rise to potentially life-threatening levels, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Medicaid Expansion Tops Savings Versus Marketplace

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid expansion is associated with greater reductions in out-of-pocket spending for previously uninsured low-income adults than Marketplace exchange coverage with premium tax credits and generous benefits, according to a report published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Medication Issues Behind One in 12 Pediatric ER Visits

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At one Canadian children's hospital, medication-related problems accounted for one in 12 emergency department visits over a year. And about two-thirds of those incidents were preventable, the researchers concluded. The findings have been published online Feb. 2 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: Vyvanse Approved for Binge-Eating Disorder

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with binge-eating disorder.

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