February 2015 Briefing - Orthopedics

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Abdominal Obesity Ups Risk of Hip Fracture

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Shorter Hospital Stay Tied to Higher Mortality Post-Hip Fx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with a broken hip are more likely to die after the fracture if they're discharged from the hospital early, according to a study published Feb. 24 in The BMJ.

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Knee OA One Year Post-ACL Reconstruction Common

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At one year post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), knee osteoarthritis (OA) is evident among a substantial proportion of patients, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Household Movement Benefits Elderly With Mobility Issues

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with physical impairments, simply reducing sedentary time benefits heart health, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Achilles Tendon Handles Downhill Running Better Than Thought

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Achilles tendon can handle downhill running better than previously thought; the key is to transition gradually to downhill running, according to research published recently in the Journal of Sports Science & Medicine.

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Fatigue, Distraction Play Role in Risk of Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significant risk factors for low back pain include fatigue, manual labor involving awkward positions, and being distracted during an activity, according to research findings reported online Feb. 9 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Manual-Thrust Manipulation Boosts Short-Term Benefit in LBP

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with low back pain (LBP), manual-thrust manipulation (MTM) is associated with greater short-term reductions in disability and pain than mechanical-assisted manipulation (MAM) or usual medical care (UMC), according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Rates of Injury From Chiropractic Care Assessed in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older Medicare beneficiaries with a neuromusculoskeletal complaint, the risk of injury is lower after an office visit for chiropractic spinal manipulation versus evaluation by a primary care physician, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Use of Nondrug, Nonsurgical Options Low in Hip, Knee OA

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Usage of nondrug, nonoperative interventions in community-dwelling individuals with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is low, according to research published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Osteoporosis-Treated Adults Have Elevated Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women and men below age 70 who are treated for osteoporosis have an excess mortality risk, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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CDC: Number of THR Procedures Up in the United States

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number of hip replacements performed in the United States has increased substantially, and the procedure has become more common in younger people, new government statistics show. The report was published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics as a February data brief.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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Post-Op Infection Rate Low for Minimally Invasive Spine Sx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing posterior transtubular microscopic assisted spinal surgery, the postoperative infection rate is very low, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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Multidisciplinary Approach Successful in Chronic Back Pain

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medication combined with a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program can decrease disability and improve mental health in low back pain patients over several years, according to a study published online Dec. 26 in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Case Series Addresses Spine Tumors in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For most pregnant patients with benign spine tumors, surgery can be postponed until after delivery, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

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Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Occupation, Work Hours Linked to Workers' Risk for Neck Pain

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Occupation and work hours are associated with increased workers' risk for neck pain, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

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Complication Rate Low for CNRA Lumbar Epidural Injections

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Complication rates for fluoroscopic-guided lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESIs) performed by certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) are similar to physician rates cited in the literature, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the Journal for Healthcare Quality.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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A Little Jogging Goes a Long Way

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A little jogging is good for your health, researchers say, but too much might not be. The findings were published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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