February 2015 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Oral Bisphosphonate Use Tied to Lower Endometrial Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women, oral bisphosphonate use is associated with a reduction in the risk of endometrial cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Distinct Immune Changes Seen in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Sx

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) appears to be linked to specific changes in a person's immune system, particularly increased amounts of chemical messengers that regulate immune responses, researchers report. The new study was published online Feb. 27 in Science Advances.

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Benefits/Risks Seen in Pregnancy Post Bariatric Surgery

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- After undergoing weight-loss surgery, women are significantly less prone to diabetes during pregnancy but twice as likely to deliver smaller-than-normal infants, according to a study published in the Feb. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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~4 Percent Increase in Primary Care Visits Expected With ACA

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The greater number of Americans with health insurance under the Affordable Care Act will lead to only a slight increase in the use of medical services, and the health system can cope with the added demand, according to a new report from The Commonwealth Fund.

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Essential Role for Pediatricians in Care of Sexual Exploitation Victims

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians have a role to play in identification and treatment of victims of child sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), according to a clinical report published online Feb. 23 in Pediatrics.

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Review: More Whole Grains, Less Coronary Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher dietary intake of whole grains may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a meta-analysis published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Younger Women Hesitate to Raise 'False Alarm' in MI

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women may ignore early warning signs of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), a new study reveals. The finding could help explain why younger women have higher rates of death from AMI than men in their age group. The study was published online Feb. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Suicide Deemed Public Health Concern in Genitourinary Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide is a public health concern for patients with genitourinary cancer, especially bladder cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Cancer.

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Remote Patient Monitoring Sector Increasing Rapidly

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The remote patient monitoring sector is growing rapidly and could have a considerable impact on health care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Even Short Term Use of NSAID With Anticoagulant Ill Advised

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) may raise the risk for myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and/or serious bleeding among MI survivors taking prescription anticoagulants, with no safe window period, according to new research. Bleeding risk rose even within the first three days of NSAID use, the team noted in a study published in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bouts of Intense Anger Greatly Up Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or anxiety greatly increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI), according to a new study published online Feb. 23 in the European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care.

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CDC: Use of Long-Acting Birth Control on Rise in U.S.

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of long-acting birth control methods such as intrauterine devices or contraceptive implants jumped five-fold between 2002 and 2011, according to a report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics as a February data brief.

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Water Used to Mix Baby Formula Plays Role in Arsenic Level

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The water used to mix baby formula plays the biggest role in whether formula-fed babies are exposed to increased levels of arsenic, according to a new study. The findings were reported online Feb. 23 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Undiagnosed/Untreated HIV Implicated in Most New Cases

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Undiagnosed and untreated people with HIV may be responsible for more than nine out of 10 new infections, according to research published online Feb. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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High Fracture Risk Could Indicate Periodontal Disease Too

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who are at high risk for fractures may also be at increased risk for gum disease, according to a study published in the January issue of Menopause.

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No Temporal Change in Incidence of Amniotic Fluid Embolism

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of and risk factors for amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) have not changed over time, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Patterns of Childhood Growth May Trigger Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain trajectories of body mass index (BMI) during childhood may increase risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life, according to research published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Americans Living Longer Post-Cancer, but Disparities Remain

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Survival rates are improving for many people with cancers of the breast, prostate, lung, liver, and colon or rectum, especially for those diagnosed at younger ages, according to research published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Oncology.

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Cancer Prevalence Low in Power Morcellation Fibroid Removal

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of power morcellation to remove fibroids in the uterus can end up spreading bits of hidden cancerous tumors throughout the abdomen, but a new study suggests the likelihood is low. Researchers called the findings, reported online Feb. 19 in JAMA Oncology, "reassuring."

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Better Informed Women Less Likely to Want Mammogram

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Educating women about the possibility of overdiagnosis from mammography screening may make some of them less likely to get the test, new research suggests. The study was published online Feb. 17 in The Lancet.

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Phthalates in First Trimester May Affect Male Fertility

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When expectant mothers are exposed to phthalates during the first trimester, their male offspring may have a greater risk of infertility later in life, a new study suggests. The report was published online Feb. 18 in Human Reproduction.

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Unhealthy Outpacing Healthy Eating in Most World Regions

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although people around the world are eating more healthy foods, that positive trend has been outpaced by a rising consumption of unhealthy foods, according to research published in the March issue of The Lancet Global Health.

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Breast Milk Consumption Trending Among Body Builders

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some bodybuilders are drinking human breast milk in the mistaken belief it will give a boost to their muscles.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Many Women Not Receiving Recommended Radiation Tx

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many American women with locally-advanced breast cancer do not receive recommended radiation therapy after mastectomy, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Noninvasive Neurotechnology Reduces Menopause Symptoms

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A noninvasive neurotechnology for autocalibration of neural oscillations is associated with a reduction in menopause-related symptoms, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Menopause.

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Moderate Exercise Twice Weekly Lowers CV Risk in Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even a few bouts of moderate exercise each week can cut a middle-aged woman's odds for coronary heart disease (CHD), venous thromboembolism (VTE), and stroke, according to new research, and exercising more frequently or strenuously may not provide greater reductions in cardiovascular risk. The findings were published online Feb. 16 in Circulation.

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Contraceptive Patch, Implant Not Tied to Endothelial Activation

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cutaneous and subdermal hormonal contraceptives do not induce endothelial activation after four months of use, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Hot Flashes Linger Long After Final Menses in Many Women

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of women experience menopause-related hot flashes and night sweats for seven years or more, according to research published online Feb. 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Osteoporosis-Treated Adults Have Elevated Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women and men below age 70 who are treated for osteoporosis have an excess mortality risk, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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HRT Use, Even Short Term, Tied to Higher Risk of Ovarian CA

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who use hormone therapy after menopause -- even for just a few years -- may have an increased risk of ovarian cancer, according to new research. The meta-analysis was published online Feb. 12 in The Lancet.

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Cancer Patients Rarely Demand Unnecessary Treatment, Tests

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients rarely request unnecessary tests or treatments, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in JAMA Oncology.

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FDA Permits Marketing of Device for Female Fecal Incontinence

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has allowed marketing of the Eclipse System for the treatment of fecal incontinence in adult women aged 18 to 75, the agency said in a news release.

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Deaths Due to Smoking Underestimated in U.S.

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- According to the U.S. Surgeon General, about 480,000 Americans die of smoking-related causes each year, but that figure may be closer to 540,000, researchers from the American Cancer Society report. The findings were published in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Maternal Smoking Linked to Shorter Fetal Telomere Length

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to tobacco is associated with shorter fetal telomere length, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Mammography Rates Down Since 2009 USPSTF Guidelines

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Since the publication of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines for mammography in 2009, there has been a decrease in mammography rates among white, Hispanic, and Asian women, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As part of American Heart Month, physicians are encouraged to focus on patients' blood pressure, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Health Benefits of Moderate Drinking May Be Overestimated

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of 52,891 British people found little to no health benefit linked to alcohol consumption, once the results were adjusted for a range of personal, social, economic, and lifestyle factors. The findings were published Feb. 10 in The BMJ.

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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IOM Proposes New Criteria, Name for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness affecting up to 2.5 million Americans, may soon get a new name and set of diagnostic criteria.

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Mercury From Seafood Tied to Higher Levels of Autoantibodies

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The mercury found in some seafood may be linked to autoimmune disorders among women of childbearing age, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Mental Stress Adversely Affects MI Recovery in Younger Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In younger people with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stress may lead to a worse recovery and this may be of particular concern among women, a new study suggests. The report was published online Feb. 9 in Circulation.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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HPV16 Seropositivity Relatively Common Before Anal Cancer

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 (HPV16) seropositivity is relatively common before anal cancer diagnosis, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Acupuncture Deemed Feasible for Vulvodynia

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture seems feasible for treatment of women with vulvodynia, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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HPV Vaccination Does Not Seem to Promote Unsafe Sex in Teens

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Getting vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV) does not appear to increase unsafe sexual practices among teen girls, according to a new study published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Oxytocin in Labor Not Linked With Later ADHD in Child

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Augmentation of labor with the medication oxytocin does not seem to raise the risk of having a child with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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One-Quarter of Adnexal Masses in Youth Are Malignant

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For children and adolescents with an adnexal mass, about 25 percent of masses are malignant, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Case Series Addresses Spine Tumors in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For most pregnant patients with benign spine tumors, surgery can be postponed until after delivery, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

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Soy Food, Isoflavone Intake Not Linked to Endometrial Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Soy food/isoflavone intake is not associated with endometrial cancer risk in Japanese women, according to a study published in the February issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Implant, Hormonal IUD Effective Beyond FDA-Approved Duration

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The contraceptive implant and the 52-mg hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) seem to be effective beyond the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved duration, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Mortality Risk of T1DM Higher for Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with type 1 diabetes have a nearly 40 percent greater risk of dying from any cause and more than double the risk of dying from heart disease than men with type 1 diabetes, according to a report published online Feb. 5 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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U.S. Lyme Disease Costs Could Exceed $1 Billion Annually

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- With an estimated 240,000 to 440,000 new cases of Lyme disease diagnosed every year, the illness costs the U.S. health care system between $712 million and $1.3 billion annually, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in PLOS ONE.

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High Coffee Intake Linked With Lower Risk of Endometrial Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High versus low intake of coffee is associated with a reduced risk for endometrial cancer, according to a new study published in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Two Novel Genetic Variants for Breast Cancer Discovered

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they have identified two new genetic variants that are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Their findings are published online Feb. 4 in Human Molecular Genetics.

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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Linked With Earlier Surgical Menopause

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Menstrual abnormalities, endometriosis, pelvic pain, hysterectomy, and early/surgical menopause are all associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), according to research published online Feb. 2 in Menopause.

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Contraception Info Given With Isotretinoin Rx Ups Safe Use

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say giving birth control information to women visiting dermatology clinics can help promote the safe use of isotretinoin. The study was published online Feb. 4 in JAMA Dermatology.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Low Adherence to Daily HIV Prophylaxis in High-Risk Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a population of predominantly young, unmarried women in sub-Saharan Africa, daily adherence to oral or vaginal tenofovir-based formulations was low, and no regimen significantly reduced the risk of HIV-1 acquisition. The study was published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Complication Rate Low for CNRA Lumbar Epidural Injections

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Complication rates for fluoroscopic-guided lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESIs) performed by certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) are similar to physician rates cited in the literature, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the Journal for Healthcare Quality.

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Lung Cancer Now Leads Cancer Mortality in Developed Nations

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer has overtaken breast cancer as the leading cancer killer of women in developed countries, reflecting changing smoking patterns among females worldwide, according to a new report published online Feb. 4 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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FDA Approves Ibrance to Treat Advanced Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ibrance (palbociclib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced breast cancer among postmenopausal women.

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Debunking Contraception Myths to Reduce Unintended Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If more women had access to modern birth control methods and used them correctly, there would be 15 million fewer unwanted pregnancies in low- and middle-income nations each year, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in Human Reproduction.

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Secondhand Smoke Exposure Down But Still Too High

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although fewer Americans are smoking and more communities have smoke-free laws, 58 million nonsmokers are still being exposed to secondhand smoke, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. Findings from the new study were published in the Feb. 3 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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AICR: Awareness of Key Cancer Risk Factors Alarmingly Low

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of Americans are aware that some major lifestyle factors can affect their cancer risk, and many people worry about cancer-causing claims that aren't backed by scientific evidence, according to a survey conducted by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). The survey results were released Wednesday to coincide with World Cancer Day.

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Review: Hormonal Rx Not Indicated As Acne Monotherapy

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hormonal therapy is recommended for treatment of acne in patients who do not respond to standard therapies, according to a review published online Jan. 27 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Pregnancy Outcomes Similar for Adult, Child Kidney Transplant

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy outcomes are similar for women who have received a kidney transplant, whether they were a child or an adult when they got their transplant, according to a new study published in the February issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Maternal Depression Up at Four Years Postpartum

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal depression is more common at four years postpartum than at any point during the first 12 months postpartum, and is more likely among women with only one child at four years postpartum, according to a study published in the February issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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