February 2015 Briefing - Diabetes & Endocrinology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Diabetes & Endocrinology for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Screening for DM at Dental Visit May Be Effective Strategy

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The dentist's office may be a good place to screen people for diabetes, according to new research published online Feb. 25 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Experimental Research Targets Emulsifiers in Food

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Emulsifiers used to improve food texture and to extend shelf life might increase the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and metabolic syndrome, according to experimental research. The study was published online Feb. 25 in Nature.

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CBT, Sertraline Insufficient in Diabetes and Depression

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic control remains unchanged with both treatments, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Water Fluoridation Linked to Hypothyroidism in Britain

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A British study has found a correlation between the amount of fluoride in public drinking water and a rise in incidence of hypothyroidism. The findings were published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Remote Patient Monitoring Sector Increasing Rapidly

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The remote patient monitoring sector is growing rapidly and could have a considerable impact on health care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Low Vitamin D May Be More Closely Tied to DM Than Obesity

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests. The findings were published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Salicylates Reduce Metabolic Clearance of Insulin

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Salsalate increases insulin concentrations by decreasing metabolic clearance of insulin (MCI), not by increasing insulin secretion, according to research published online Feb. 13 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Patterns of Childhood Growth May Trigger Type 2 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain trajectories of body mass index (BMI) during childhood may increase risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life, according to research published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

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Researchers Question Benefits of Treadmill Desks

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study may dampen some of the enthusiasm about treadmill desks. Researchers found that the desks are expensive, challenging to incorporate into an office setting, and may do little to boost meaningful activity levels. Findings from the study were published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Lack of Sleep Tied to Increased Levels of Free Fatty Acids

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research helps explain why getting too little sleep might boost diabetes risk. The study was published online Feb. 19 in Diabetologia.

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Three Meds for Diabetic Macular Edema Compared

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research compared three leading drugs for diabetic macular edema -- bevacizumab (Avastin), aflibercept (Eylea), and ranibizumab (Lucentis) -- and although aflibercept came out on top, all were effective options. The study was published online Feb. 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Unhealthy Outpacing Healthy Eating in Most World Regions

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although people around the world are eating more healthy foods, that positive trend has been outpaced by a rising consumption of unhealthy foods, according to research published in the March issue of The Lancet Global Health.

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Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

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Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

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Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Increasing Dietary Fiber Leads to Other Healthy Changes

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A simple high-fiber diet can provide health benefits while being easier to stick with than a diet calling for multiple changes in eating habits, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

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Many Adults Maintain Adequate Vitamin D With Minimal UVR

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults maintain adequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels even in periods of minimal ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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At Least 4 to 5 Percent Weight Loss Needed to Cut Diabetes Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For Japanese men with visceral fat accumulation and hemoglobin A1C (A1C) of 5.6 to 6.4 percent, minimization of the risk of diabetes requires a minimum of 4 to 5 percent weight loss, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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FDA Approves Lenvima for Type of Thyroid Cancer

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The kinase inhibitor Lenvima (lenvatinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat differentiated thyroid cancer that has progressed despite radioactive iodine therapy, the agency said Friday in a news release.

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Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

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Osteoporosis-Treated Adults Have Elevated Risk of Mortality

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women and men below age 70 who are treated for osteoporosis have an excess mortality risk, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

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Lenvatinib Delays Progression in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Oral lenvatinib delayed progression of advanced thyroid cancer by 18 months, compared with four months for patients treated with a placebo, according to results from a new clinical trial. Results of the study were published in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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MetS Prevalent Among Seniors at Risk of Mobility Disability

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults at high risk of mobility disability, metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

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Risk of Psychiatric Disorders Up for Children With T1DM

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, especially in the six months after diagnosis, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in Diabetes Care.

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AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As part of American Heart Month, physicians are encouraged to focus on patients' blood pressure, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

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Low Childhood Vitamin D Levels May Up Adult CVD Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who had low vitamin D levels as children and teens may be more likely to have atherosclerosis, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Naps Counteract Negative Effects of Sleep Deprivation

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Brief daytime naps might protect against the harmful health effects of a poor night's sleep, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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BP Meds Benefit Diabetes Patients, Even Without HTN

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis indicates that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to suffer myocardial infarctions, strokes, or early mortality when they take blood pressure medications -- even if they don't actually have hypertension. The study was published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Residential Program Cuts CVD Risk Factors in Obese Youth

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extremely obese adolescents in an intensive 10-month residential treatment program lost more weight than their counterparts, and appeared to reverse endothelial dysfunction that could lead to atherosclerosis, according to a new study published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

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FDA Expands Approval of Lucentis for Diabetic Retinopathy

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded the approved use for Lucentis (ranibizumab injection) 0.3 mg to treat diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetic macular edema.

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Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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Less Common Bariatric Procedure = More Weight Loss

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A less-popular type of weight loss surgery might actually lead to more weight loss than gastric bypass -- the currently favored form of obesity surgery. But, the trade-off seems to be more complications, new research suggests. The study findings were published online Feb. 4 in JAMA Surgery.

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Mortality Risk of T1DM Higher for Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with type 1 diabetes have a nearly 40 percent greater risk of dying from any cause and more than double the risk of dying from heart disease than men with type 1 diabetes, according to a report published online Feb. 5 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Monounsaturated Fatty Acids May Improve Adipose Dysfunction

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) may reduce inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue, according to research published online Jan. 27 in Diabetes.

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Younger Patients With Diabetes More Often Skipping Visits

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One in every five young American adults with diabetes hasn't seen a doctor in the past six months, according to a February data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

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