February 2015 Briefing - Cardiology

Share this content:

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for February 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

AMA: Key Steps for Minimizing Liability Risk in Telemedicine

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Key steps should be taken to minimize the potential risk of liability resulting from use of telemedicine, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

No Response to Statin May Mean More Rapid Atheroma Progression

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty percent of people with coronary artery disease experience little or no reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from statin treatment, according to research published online Feb. 26 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Invasive Strategy Improves Outcome in Elderly With ACS

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An invasive strategy using coronary angiography results in a better outcome in elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to research published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Home Walking Program Improves Erectile Function After MI

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with recent acute myocardial infarction, a home-based walking program is associated with a reduction in reported erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Musculoskeletal Pain for Workers in Interventional Lab

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health care workers who are involved in procedures utilizing radiation more often report experiencing work-related musculoskeletal pain, according to a study published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Struggle With Routine Tasks Predicts Adverse CHF Outcomes

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients who struggle to perform daily tasks are at increased risk for hospitalization and death, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Six-Month Dual Antiplatelet Tx Noninferior to 24-Month DAPT

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For aspirin-sensitive patients undergoing everolimus-eluting stent implantation, six-month dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is noninferior to 24-month DAPT, according to a study published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Review: More Whole Grains, Less Coronary Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher dietary intake of whole grains may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a meta-analysis published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Younger Women Hesitate to Raise 'False Alarm' in MI

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women may ignore early warning signs of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), a new study reveals. The finding could help explain why younger women have higher rates of death from AMI than men in their age group. The study was published online Feb. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text

Even Short Term Use of NSAID With Anticoagulant Ill Advised

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) may raise the risk for myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and/or serious bleeding among MI survivors taking prescription anticoagulants, with no safe window period, according to new research. Bleeding risk rose even within the first three days of NSAID use, the team noted in a study published in the Feb. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Remote Patient Monitoring Sector Increasing Rapidly

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The remote patient monitoring sector is growing rapidly and could have a considerable impact on health care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

More Information

Bouts of Intense Anger Greatly Up Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or anxiety greatly increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI), according to a new study published online Feb. 23 in the European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Frequent Sauna Use Linked to Heart Health Benefits in Men

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Men who use saunas frequently may be less likely to die from heart disease, according to research published online Feb. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Not Linked to Cardiac Arrhythmia

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In critically ill patients, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is not associated with cardiac arrhythmia, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Say Cost Matters Greatly in Choosing Doctor

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The number one determining factor for selecting a doctor is whether the physician is in-network, according to a report published by Vitals.

More Information

Researchers Question Benefits of Treadmill Desks

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study may dampen some of the enthusiasm about treadmill desks. Researchers found that the desks are expensive, challenging to incorporate into an office setting, and may do little to boost meaningful activity levels. Findings from the study were published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Revascularization Cuts Mortality, MACE in Coronary CTO

FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) and well-developed collateral circulation, revascularization is associated with reduced risk of cardiac mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE), according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Fear of Discrimination Keeps Many LGBT Med Students Silent

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of discrimination is a major reason why about one-third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical students stay "in the closet," new research finds. The study was published online Feb. 16 in Academic Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors, Pharmacists Least Likely Health Pros to Divorce

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors appear less likely to get divorced than most other health care professionals, according to research published online Feb. 18 in The BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial subscription or payment may be required)

Household Movement Benefits Elderly With Mobility Issues

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with physical impairments, simply reducing sedentary time benefits heart health, according to a study published online Feb. 18 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Unhealthy Outpacing Healthy Eating in Most World Regions

THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although people around the world are eating more healthy foods, that positive trend has been outpaced by a rising consumption of unhealthy foods, according to research published in the March issue of The Lancet Global Health.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Article Emphasizes Importance of Apology in Medical Error

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Apology laws, which prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit, are unnecessary if physicians understand the importance of saying sorry and offering accountability after an error, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

Full Text

Post-Electrophysiology Mortality Usually Not Related to Procedure

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Half of major complications within 30 days of electrophysiology (EP) procedures occur after discharge, but the majority of deaths are not directly related to the procedure, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

'Most Comprehensive Map' of Human Epigenomes Presented

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have issued a comprehensive map of human epigenomes -- the range of chemical and structural shifts that determine how genes govern health. The group published the new map online Feb. 18 in Nature, accompanied by simultaneous publication in six other sister journals.

Full Text

Cardiovascular Health Calculators Overestimate Actual Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Four of five widely used formulas may overestimate people's risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) by as much as 154 percent in some cases, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. That includes the most recently developed risk calculator, unveiled alongside new treatment guidelines in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA).

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fondaparinux Found to Effectively Treat NSTEMI

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a new study, patients who received fondaparinux to treat non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) had a lower risk of major bleeding and death compared to patients who received low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). The findings were published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increasing Dietary Fiber Leads to Other Healthy Changes

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A simple high-fiber diet can provide health benefits while being easier to stick with than a diet calling for multiple changes in eating habits, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Moderate Exercise Twice Weekly Lowers CV Risk in Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even a few bouts of moderate exercise each week can cut a middle-aged woman's odds for coronary heart disease (CHD), venous thromboembolism (VTE), and stroke, according to new research, and exercising more frequently or strenuously may not provide greater reductions in cardiovascular risk. The findings were published online Feb. 16 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

High Deductible Plans Factor Into Physician-Patient Relationship

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In an environment where patients are increasingly aware of the costs of health care, physicians need to be prepared to address these issues with their patients, according to an article published Feb. 4 in Medical Economics.

Full Text

Productivity Growth in U.S. Hospitals During 2002 to 2011

MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- During 2002 to 2011, U.S. hospitals experienced productivity growth in treating Medicare patients with heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text

Limited Evidence on Management of Dyslipidemia in HIV

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A detailed guide has been presented for clinicians who manage dyslipidemia in HIV-infected patients. The guide, based on and extrapolated from guidelines for the general population, has been published online Feb. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Tend to Prefer Formal Physician Attire

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients often prefer physicians with formal attire and white coats, according to a systematic review published online Jan. 19 in BMJ Open.

Abstract
Full Text

Latino Physician Shortage Has Worsened Since 1980

FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2010 the Latino physician shortage worsened, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Academic Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Deaths Due to Smoking Underestimated in U.S.

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- According to the U.S. Surgeon General, about 480,000 Americans die of smoking-related causes each year, but that figure may be closer to 540,000, researchers from the American Cancer Society report. The findings were published in the Feb. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

MetS Prevalent Among Seniors at Risk of Mobility Disability

THURSDAY, Feb. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults at high risk of mobility disability, metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Seven Tips Help Doctors Prepare for Meaningful Use Audits

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Given that physicians are chosen for meaningful use (MU) audits at random, the best way to prepare is for a physician to assume they will be audited, according to an article published Jan. 28 in Medical Economics.

More Information

AMA: Use American Heart Month to Focus on Patients' BP

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As part of American Heart Month, physicians are encouraged to focus on patients' blood pressure, according to a report from the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Americans' Complementary Health Approaches Changing

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal. Both surveys, which were published Feb. 10 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), looked at the overall use of alternative or complementary medicine among Americans.

Report - Adults
Report - Children

More Donor Hearts Discarded Even As Need Grows

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even as the need for heart transplants increases, more donor hearts are being discarded, with a new study showing that only one in three donated hearts finds a recipient. The new report was published online Feb. 10 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text

Low Childhood Vitamin D Levels May Up Adult CVD Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who had low vitamin D levels as children and teens may be more likely to have atherosclerosis, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text

Health Benefits of Moderate Drinking May Be Overestimated

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of 52,891 British people found little to no health benefit linked to alcohol consumption, once the results were adjusted for a range of personal, social, economic, and lifestyle factors. The findings were published Feb. 10 in The BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial

ICDs May Provide Little Benefit When Implanted Over Age 70

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may not benefit all patients to the same degree, as their effectiveness seems to diminish somewhat with the advancing age of the patient, according to a review published online Feb. 10 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

BP Meds Benefit Diabetes Patients, Even Without HTN

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis indicates that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to suffer myocardial infarctions, strokes, or early mortality when they take blood pressure medications -- even if they don't actually have hypertension. The study was published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mental Stress Adversely Affects MI Recovery in Younger Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In younger people with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stress may lead to a worse recovery and this may be of particular concern among women, a new study suggests. The report was published online Feb. 9 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Research Misconduct ID'd by FDA Often Unreported in Literature

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A review of U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection reports between 1998 and 2013 revealed 57 clinical trials in which regulators had uncovered violations serious enough to earn the agency's most severe classification -- "official action indicated," or OAI. The findings were published online Feb. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA OKs Device to Help Prevent Procedure-Related Stroke

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The ENROUTE Transcarotid Neuroprotection System (TNS) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a minimally invasive device designed to help prevent stroke during stent and angioplasty procedures.

More Information

ACC/AHA Risk Score No Better for Identifying Elevated CAC in RA

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 10-year risk score does not improve identification of those with elevated cardiovascular risk based on high coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Confidence Not Accurate Measure of Prescribing Competence

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For medical students, self-reported confidence in prescribing only weakly correlates with actual competence, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Some Angiotensin Receptor Blockers More Potent Than Others

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Different angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have distinct potencies for suppressing adrenal β-arrestin1 (βarr1)-dependent post-myocardial infarction (MI) hyperaldosteronism, according to a letter published in the Dec. 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Residential Program Cuts CVD Risk Factors in Obese Youth

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extremely obese adolescents in an intensive 10-month residential treatment program lost more weight than their counterparts, and appeared to reverse endothelial dysfunction that could lead to atherosclerosis, according to a new study published online Feb. 9 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Smartphone ECGs Have Similar Accuracy to Standard ECGs

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wireless, single-lead real-time smartphone electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring accurately detects baseline intervals and atrial rate and rhythm, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Motivational Interviewing Can Help Reach Nonadherent Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing can be a useful approach for reaching noncompliant patients, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

More Information

U.S. Lyme Disease Costs Could Exceed $1 Billion Annually

FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- With an estimated 240,000 to 440,000 new cases of Lyme disease diagnosed every year, the illness costs the U.S. health care system between $712 million and $1.3 billion annually, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in PLOS ONE.

Full Text

Prompt, Aggressive BP Management Encouraged

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with systolic blood pressure higher than 150 mm Hg face increased risks without aggressive drug treatment started within a month and a half, according to research findings published Feb. 5 in The BMJ.

Full Text

Device Used in Europe Promising for Refractory Angina

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A stent-like device placed in the coronary sinus may benefit patients with refractory angina, according to a small clinical trial published in the Feb. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The Reducer device is already approved in Europe but not yet in the United States.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Perspective on Dr. Davidson: 'Be Like Mike'

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The tragic shooting of surgeon Michael Davidson can be used as an opportunity to find meaning in tragedy, according to a perspective piece published online Feb. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Early Rehab Doesn't Increase Adverse Events Post-CABG

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Early enrollment in cardiac rehabilitation does not increase major adverse event rates among patients who recently underwent open heart surgery, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

One in Three Prefer Earlier Death to Daily Pill

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One out of three adults would sooner face a shorter life span than take a daily pill to prevent cardiovascular disease, according to a new Internet survey published online Feb. 3 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text

A Little Jogging Goes a Long Way

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A little jogging is good for your health, researchers say, but too much might not be. The findings were published in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Too Many Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients on IV Fluids

TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Potentially harmful intravenous (IV) fluids are being given to too many patients with severe heart failure, according to a new study published in the Feb. 1 issue of JACC: Heart Failure.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Patient Engagement Can Cut Costs, Improve Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patient engagement initiatives can decrease costs without sacrificing quality care, according to an article published Jan. 22 in Medical Economics.

More Information

Spironolactone + TMP-SMX May Up Risk of Sudden Death

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Taking spironolactone alongside the antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole can cause blood potassium to rise to potentially life-threatening levels, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Mediterranean Diet Linked to Lower Left Ventricular Mass

MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Greater adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (DT) is tied to decreased left ventricular (LV) mass, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

Trends in HIV/AIDS Have Worsened in African-Americans

Trends in HIV/AIDS Have Worsened in African-Americans

Action plan developed for community leaders that can reduce the disparity in HIV/AIDS

cfDNA Screening First for Trisomy 21 Doesn't Cut Miscarriage Rate

cfDNA Screening First for Trisomy 21 Doesn't Cut ...

Invasive testing if positive for trisomy 21 on cfDNA screen compared with immediate invasive testing

HPV Legislation Doesn't Impact Teen Sexual Behaviors

HPV Legislation Doesn't Impact Teen Sexual Behaviors

No substantive or significant associations between HPV legislation and adolescent sexual behaviors

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »