Family History Linked to Early-Onset A-Fib in Minorities

Share this content:
Family History Linked to Early-Onset A-Fib in Minorities
Family History Linked to Early-Onset A-Fib in Minorities

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Probands of African or Hispanic/Latino descent with early-onset atrial fibrillation (EOAF) are more likely than European Americans to have a first-degree relative with AF, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Network Open.

Zain Alzahrani, M.D., from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and colleagues conducted a cohort study to examine the role of family history in the pathogenesis of EOAF in racial and ethnic minorities. A total of 664 patients were administered questionnaires that included questions on family history of AF.

The researchers found that 49 percent of probands with EOAF had a family history, compared with 22 percent of patients with non-EOAF (difference, 27 percent). Compared with probands with EOAF of European descent, those of African or Hispanic descent had increased adjusted odds of having a first-degree relative with AF (adjusted odds ratio, 2.69 and 9.25 versus 2.51). Across the three racial and ethnic groups, probands with EOAF were more likely to have a first-degree relative with AF compared with those with non-EOAF (adjusted odds ratio, 3.02). Compared with racially and ethnically matched control patients with non-EOAF, African American, European American, and Hispanic/Latino probands with EOAF were more likely to have a first-degree relative with confirmed AF.

"Our findings support genetic predisposition to EOAF across all three racial and ethnic groups studied and have important implications for identifying family members at risk for AF and screening candidate genes," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

FDA: Gout Drug Uloric Increases Risk of Death

FDA: Gout Drug Uloric Increases Risk of Death

Medication is associated with increased risk of heart-related death and death from all causes

Since Early 2000s, Overdose Death Rates Are Highest in U.S.

Since Early 2000s, Overdose Death Rates Are Highest ...

U.S. was not an outlier in terms of drug overdose mortality prior to the early 2000s

National Health Spending Set to Increase 5.5 Percent Annually

National Health Spending Set to Increase 5.5 Percent ...

Long-observed demographic and economic factors expected to drive growth in health spending

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »