Displaying Prices to Providers Seems to Reduce Order Costs

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Displaying Prices to Providers Seems to Reduce Order Costs
Displaying Prices to Providers Seems to Reduce Order Costs

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Displaying order prices to physicians seems to reduce order costs, according to a review published online Oct. 23 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Mark T. Silvestri, M.D., from the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues conducted a systematic review to examine the impact of displaying order prices to physicians on patterns of care. Data were included from 19 studies (five randomized trials, 13 pre-post intervention studies, and one time series analysis) that assessed the impact of showing numeric prices of laboratory tests, imaging studies, or medications to providers in real time during the ordering process.

The researchers found that 10 of the 15 studies that reported the quantitative impact of price display on aggregate order costs or volume demonstrated a significant decrease in the intervention group. Price display more often decreased aggregate order costs than order volume (nine of 13 studies versus three of eight studies, respectively). Five studies examined patient safety, which was not affected by price display. Evidence was limited but suggested that provider acceptability tended to be positive.

"Provider price display likely reduces order costs to a modest degree," the authors write. "More high-quality evidence is needed to confirm these findings within a modern context."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

FDA Permits Marketing of Brain Stimulation Device for OCD

FDA Permits Marketing of Brain Stimulation Device for ...

FDA previously approved transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depression, certain migraines

Comments Open on End of NIH Review for Gene Therapy Studies

Comments Open on End of NIH Review for ...

NIH oversight panel no longer plans to review all applications for gene therapy experiments

U.S. Measles Outbreak Hits 107 Cases in 21 States, D.C.

U.S. Measles Outbreak Hits 107 Cases in 21 ...

Outbreak on track to exceed last year's; most of the people who got measles weren't vaccinated

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »