December 2018 Briefing - Allergy

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for December 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Low-Priced Generic Drugs Most Likely to Have Shortages

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The lowest-priced generic drugs are more likely to experience shortages, according to a study published in the November issue of Value in Health.

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Pediatric Asthma Risk Score Has Good Sensitivity, Specificity

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new quantitative personalized tool can better predict asthma development in young children than the Asthma Predictive Index (API), according to a study published online Dec. 13 in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Initiative Can Cut Gender Gap in Medical School Faculty Salaries

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An institutional gender equity initiative (GEI) can reduce gender-based salary gaps among medical school faculty, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in JAMA Network Open.

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Affordable Care Act Sign-Ups Higher Than Expected

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite numerous difficulties, early figures show that sign-ups for health coverage next year under the Affordable Care Act are higher than expected.

AP News Article

Growth in Use of Telemedicine Seen From 2005 to 2017

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From 2005 to 2017, there was a substantial increase in telemedicine use, although use was still uncommon in 2017, according to a research letter published online Nov. 27 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Food Allergy Linked to Increased Multiple Sclerosis Activity

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), food allergy is associated with a greater number of attacks and with a higher likelihood of gadolinium-enhancing lesions, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Exclusion of Doctors From Public Health Insurance Up 2007 to 2017

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From 2007 to 2017, the number of physicians excluded from Medicare and state public insurance programs increased, according to a study published online Dec. 14 in JAMA Network Open.

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Subfertility Linked to Increased Asthma Risk in Offspring

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parental subfertility is associated with an increased asthma risk among offspring, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in Thorax.

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Persistent Discrimination ID'd Among Physician Mothers

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physician mothers experience discrimination in a range of ways, which can impact the medical profession, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in The BMJ.

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Medication Errors Resulting in Death Most Common in Elderly

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Medication errors in acute care that result in death occur most often in patients older than 75 years, with the most common error category being omitted medicine or ingredient, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy.

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Enrollment Under the Affordable Care Act Down From Last Year

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Enrollment for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is down with just days left to sign up, according to the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

AP News Article

2017 Saw Slowing in National Health Care Spending

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- National health care spending slowed in 2017, according to a report published online Dec. 6 in Health Affairs.

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U.S. Medical Schools See Increase in Diversity

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- After implementation of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) diversity accreditation standards, U.S. medical schools saw increasing percentages of female, black, and Hispanic matriculants, according to a research letter published in the Dec. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Paid Childbearing Policies Lacking for Residents

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Policies for paid childbearing or family leave for residents are lacking at top-ranking medical schools and may be exacerbated by lack of direction from specialty boards, according to two research letters published in the Dec. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Tap Water in Neti Pot Linked to Death From Brain-Eating Amoeba

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The use of tap water in a nasal-flushing Neti pot likely led to a Seattle woman's death from a Balamuthia mandrillaris brain infection, doctors write in a case study.

CBS News Article
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HIT-Related Stress Linked to Burnout Among Physicians

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Stress related to use of health information technology (HIT) is common and predictive of burnout among physicians, according to a study published online Dec. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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PM2.5 Exposure Linked to Asthma Rescue Medication Use

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with asthma, increased fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure is associated with increased weekly rescue inhaler use, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Most Insured Patients Not Using Online Portals

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly two-thirds of insured adults with a previous health care visit did not use an online patient portal in 2017, according to a study published in the December issue of Health Affairs.

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Lack of Peds Preventive Care Ups Unplanned Hospital Admissions

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lack of preventive care in infants and children is associated with an increased rate of unplanned hospital admissions, according to a study recently published in BMC Medicine.

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Secondhand Smoke Exposure Saw Big Drop From 1988 to 2014

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke exposure declined substantially among U.S. nonsmokers from 1988 through 2014, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Projected Distribution of Common Ragweed Modeled in U.S.

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Common ragweed is expected to expand at the northern margins of its current distribution, according to a study recently published in PLOS ONE.

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Smoke Exposure High in Low-Income, Nonurban Infants

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Infants from low-income, nonurban families have a high magnitude of environmental smoke exposure, according to a study published online Dec. 5 in Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

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Few Physicians Work in Practices That Use Telemedicine

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Only 15.4 percent of physicians work in practices that use telemedicine for a wide spectrum of patient interactions, with larger practice size being an important correlate of telemedicine use, according to a study published in the December issue of Health Affairs.

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Many Patients Withhold Information From Clinicians

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients intentionally withhold information from clinicians, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in JAMA Network Open.

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Editorial

HHS Issues Draft Strategy for Reducing Health IT Burden

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has developed a draft strategy to reduce the health information technology (IT) burden, and the strategy is open for public comment through Jan. 28, 2019.

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Mean Cumulative Lifetime Prevalence of Eczema 9.9 Percent

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The mean cumulative lifetime prevalence of atopic eczema is 9.9 percent, according to a research letter published online Dec. 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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