Better Dietary Patterns Among U.S. Adults Could Save Billions

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Better Dietary Patterns Among U.S. Adults Could Save Billions
Better Dietary Patterns Among U.S. Adults Could Save Billions

MONDAY, June 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Increased adherence to healthy dietary patterns could result in health care savings from improved health outcomes, according to a study presented during Nutrition 2018, the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, held from June 9 to 12 in Boston.

Using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) or the Mediterranean-style diet (MED) scores, Carolyn Scrafford, Ph.D., M.P.H., from Exponent Inc. in Washington, D.C., and colleagues assessed the impact on health care costs of increased adherence to healthy eating patterns among U.S. adults. The resulting change in risk was combined with published data on annual health care and indirect costs in order to estimate cost.

The researchers found that based on a 20 percent increase in the MED and HEI-2015 scores, the overall modelled cost savings were $25.7 billion and $38.1 billion, respectively. The cost savings resulted from reductions in cardiovascular disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes for both scores, and included Alzheimer's disease and hip fractures for the MED. Cost savings were estimated at $66.9 and $135 billion, respectively, if the diet quality of U.S. adults were to improve to achieve 80 percent of the maximum HEI-2015 and MED scores.

"Our results suggest that it's worthwhile to educate Americans on these dietary patterns and their components, to encourage them to make little changes to improve their diet quality," Scrafford said in a statement.

The authors are employees of Exponent Inc.; the study was partially funded by the National Dairy Council.

Abstract
More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

CDC Identifies Drugs Frequently Involved in Drug Overdose Deaths

CDC Identifies Drugs Frequently Involved in Drug Overdose ...

Oxycodone, heroin, and fentanyl ranked first in 2011, 2012-2015, 2016; cocaine ranked second or third

2017 Saw Slowing in National Health Care Spending

2017 Saw Slowing in National Health Care Spending

Slower growth in health care spending mainly due to use and intensity of goods and services

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Prostate Cancer Linked

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Prostate Cancer Linked

At age 60, men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher values of prostate-specific antigen

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »