ARVO: Ebolavirus Can Persist During Convalescence

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
ARVO: <i>Ebolavirus</i> Can Persist During Convalescence
ARVO: Ebolavirus Can Persist During Convalescence

FRIDAY, May 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recovery from Ebola virus disease (EVD) can be complicated by acute anterior uveitis, with persistent Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) within the eye, according to a case report published online May 7 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, held from May 3 to 7 in Denver.

Jay B. Varkey, M.D., from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues describe a patient who recovered from EVD and was subsequently found to have severe unilateral uveitis during convalescence.

The researchers describe the case of a previously healthy 43-year-old male physician who received a diagnosis of EVD while working in Sierra Leone. Ten weeks after EVD symptom onset, many of the patient's symptoms had improved, but new symptoms had developed, including ophthalmic symptoms. One month later, the patient presented with acute onset of redness, blurred vision, pain, and photophobia in the left eye. The left intraocular pressure was elevated at 44 mm Hg, and the patient was diagnosed with anterior uveitis and ocular hypertension. The symptoms worsened and the aqueous humor tested positive for viable EBOV RNA. The patient's condition improved with treatment, and follow-up ophthalmic evaluations are ongoing.

"This case highlights an important complication of EVD with major implications for both individual and public health that are immediately relevant to the ongoing West African outbreak," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text
More Information

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Trending Activities

All Professions

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

More in Home

Phone-Based Intervention Aids Rheumatoid Arthritis Care

Phone-Based Intervention Aids Rheumatoid Arthritis Care

Educational phone calls with nurses promote shared decision making in care

Early PT Linked to Less Opioid Use in Musculoskeletal Pain

Early PT Linked to Less Opioid Use in ...

For opioid-naive patients, early physical therapy tied to less opioid use in shoulder, neck, knee, back pain

Emotional Stress of Holidays Can Trigger Heart Attacks

Emotional Stress of Holidays Can Trigger Heart Attacks

Higher risk seen on Christmas Eve, particularly in older adults with diabetes, heart disease

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »