April 2015 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for April 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cognitive Therapy for Insomnia Reduces Pain in Knee OA

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and insomnia, cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is efficacious and deceases clinical pain, according to a study published in the May issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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FDA Approves First Generic Abilify

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic versions of the atypical antipsychotic drug Abilify (aripiprazole) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

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Buprenorphine Given in ER Benefits Opioid Dependent

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A comparison of three treatments for opioid dependence indicates that patients given buprenorphine in the emergency department do better than those given only referrals. The research was published in the April 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Worse Working Memory in Women Versus Men Post Mild TBI

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research from Taiwan uncovers more evidence that women may have a more difficult time recovering their memory after concussions. The study appears online April 28 in Radiology.

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Physician Compensation Up for Most Specialties

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician compensation has gone up for almost all specialties, according to a 2015 report published by Medscape.

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CDC: Surveillance System Can Help Reduce Health Care Injuries

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A surveillance system for health care facilities can be used to identify and help reduce the number of preventable injuries among health care personnel, according to research published in the April 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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AAP Advises Doctors on How to Identify Child Abuse

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has just released new guidance to help primary care doctors recognize the signs of child abuse. The clinical report was published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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Office Visits Common Before Suicide Attempt

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many people who attempt suicide have a health care visit in the weeks or months beforehand, which suggests health visits may provide opportunities for suicide prevention, researchers report in a new study published in the May issue of Medical Care.

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Anxiety, Depression, PTSD Common After Acute Lung Injury

FRIDAY, April 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most acute lung injury (ALI) survivors have symptoms of general anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during 24 months of follow-up, according to a study published in the March issue of Critical Care Medicine.

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National Health Alert Issued Over HIV Outbreak in Indiana

FRIDAY, April 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- With opioid abuse now linked to 142 cases of HIV in rural Indiana, U.S. health officials are alerting other states to watch for clusters of HIV and hepatitis C among injection drug users.

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Challenging Jobs Could Protect in Frontotemporal Dementia

FRIDAY, April 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a challenging job may help people live longer after developing frontotemporal dementia, according to a small study published online April 22 in Neurology.

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SAMHSA: Heroin Use Stabilizing in U.S., but Still Too High

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of heroin use in the United States have stabilized but are still high, according to an April 23 report from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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EHR Data Mining Helps With Quality Improvement

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) are a valuable source of data that can be mined to help practices with quality improvement performance, according to a study published in Medical Economics.

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Parent Training Program Can Improve Child Behavior in Autism

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Training programs for parents can help improve the behavior of children with autism, according to a study published in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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More Reassurance Against MMR-Autism Link

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yet another study finds no evidence that the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine raises the risk of autism -- even among children who are at increased genetic risk. The latest research was reported in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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Mindfulness-Based CBT Found As Effective As Antidepressants

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is as effective as antidepressant medication in preventing a recurrence of depression over a two-year period, according to research published online April 20 in The Lancet.

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Eating Disorders Common in Girls With Type 1 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For girls and young women with type 1 diabetes, eating disorders are common and persistent, according to a study published online April 17 in Diabetes Care.

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Sucrose Intake Linked to Higher Activity in Left Hippocampus

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sucrose, but not aspartame, consumption is associated with higher activity in the left hippocampus and reduced stress-induced cortisol, according to a study published online April 16 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Changing Opioid Rx Formulations May Help Curb Abuse

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Opioids that have features that make them hard to abuse may be linked to a drop in both the number of prescriptions and overdoses of these drugs, according to a new study published online April 20 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Regular Walking Can Boost Quality of Life With Prostate CA

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Engaging in a regular walking regimen can improve well-being for men with prostate cancer, according to new research published online April 16 in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Research and Practice.

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Higher Altitude Linked With Lower Rates of ADHD

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of higher altitude may reduce the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests. The research was published online March 25 in the Journal of Attention Disorders.

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Recent Substance Abuse Found in Nearly One in 10 Workers

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 full-time workers in the United States have had a recent substance abuse problem, according to an April 16 report from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Clinician-Referred Exercise Program Beneficial in Prostate CA

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For men with prostate cancer, clinician referral to and participation in an exercise program has a positive impact on mental health, according to a study published online April 15 in Cancer.

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Suboptimal Prescribing Attitudes Could Signal Personal Distress

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in personal distress may be more likely to have suboptimal attitudes about self-prescribing and personal responsibility for reporting impaired colleagues, according to a study published in the April issue of Academic Medicine.

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Synthetic Drug 'Flakka' Causes Hallucinations, Fits of Rage

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A potent new designer drug called "flakka" is making headlines across the United States, driving many users into fits of screaming rage accompanied by vivid hallucinations.

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Snoring, Sleep Apnea Linked to Dementia, but CPAP Helps

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may be more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at younger ages than those without SDB, a new study suggests. The report was published online April 15 in Neurology.

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Ethical Implications for Looking Up Applicants on Facebook

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Looking up students on Facebook and other social networking sites (SNS) is associated with ethical concerns, according to a perspective piece published in the March issue of the Journal of Graduate Medical Education.

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Medicare Spending Down in Year One of Pioneer ACO

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare spending is down in year one of the Pioneer accountable care organization (ACO) program, according to a study published online April 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AMA Announces End of Sustainable Growth Rate Formula

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recently adopted legislation has repealed the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Response to Parental Concerns of Autism Found Lacking

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The behavior of health care providers is likely a very important factor in delayed autism identification, according to new research published online April 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Depression, Diabetes Both Tied to Increased Dementia Risk

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and diabetes both appear to significantly raise the risk of dementia, according to new research. The findings were published online April 15 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Acetaminophen Appears to Blunt Emotional Response

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen may do more than simply dull pain -- it may also dull positive and negative emotions, new research indicates. The study was published online April 10 in Psychological Science.

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Arginine Implicated in Experimental Alzheimer's Research

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An immune system disorder may play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, research in mice suggests. The study was published in the April 15 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Survey Looks at Patient Attitudes Regarding Informed Consent

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. adults would prefer to be asked for permission to participate in studies assessing usual medical practices, according to a study published online April 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Gestational Diabetes May Increase Risk of Autism

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational diabetes may increase the risk a child will develop autism, according to research published in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Security Breaches of Health Records Up Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breaches in data security exposed more than 29 million health records to potential criminal misuse between 2010 and 2013, according to a new study. Security breaches involving hacking have nearly doubled in recent years, rising to 8.7 percent in 2013 compared with 4.7 percent in 2010, according to the study, published as a research letter in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Placebo Response May Depend on Individual DNA

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The strength of the placebo effect may depend on particular DNA, according to a report published online April 13 in Trends in Molecular Medicine.

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Gratitude Linked With Better Outcomes in Heart Patients

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of gratitude are associated with better mood, better sleep, less fatigue, and less inflammation in heart failure patients, according to a study published in the March issue of Spirituality in Clinical Practice.

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Many Doctors Haven't Started Dealing With ICD-10 Revision

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians have barely begun to deal with issues relating to documentation associated with the transition to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Medical Debt Burden Higher in Texas, Florida

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significantly more adults in Florida and Texas struggle to pay medical bills or pay off medical debt over time compared with residents of New York and California, according to a new Commonwealth Fund report released Friday.

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Art Program Hones Med Students' Visual Observation Skills

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An innovative interdisciplinary program, Art Rounds, is effective for improving medical and nursing students' physical observation skills, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Nursing Education.

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Overweight/Obesity Linked to Reduced Risk of Dementia

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study of nearly two million people suggests that those who are overweight or obese in middle age may be less likely to develop dementia than their normal-weight and underweight peers. The report was published online April 9 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Migraine Medication Linked to Eating Disorders in Teens

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Topiramate (Topamax) used for migraine headaches has been linked to increased odds of eating disorders in some teens. The report was published online April 6 in Pediatrics.

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Higher Risk of Suicide Seen in Stroke Survivors

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients are at significantly increased risk of suicide, especially during the first two years after the stroke, according to a new study published online April 1 in Neurology.

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Pharmacists Raise Concerns for Patient Access to Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all pharmacists have experienced upswings in the acquisition costs of generic drugs, with price spikes reported to be worse since 2013, according to a report published by the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA).

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Mindfulness Program Beneficial for Chronic Pain

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A mindfulness program appears to be beneficial for patients with chronic pain, according to a study published in the April issue of Pain Medicine.

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Internet-Based CBT Helps Women With Fear of Childbirth

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) program can improve attitudes among nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth, according to a study published online March 27 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Less Depression Reported by Black Women

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Black women are much less likely to report suffering from depression than white women, a new study suggests. The findings were published online April 8 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Conventional, Religiously Integrated CBT Similarly Effective

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with major depression and chronic medical illness, conventional cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) and religiously integrated CBT (RCBT) have equivalent efficacy, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease.

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Limited Time Available to Review Sunshine Act Data

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have only 45 days to review and dispute reports regarding their financial ties to drug and medical device manufacturers reported under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Med Students, Residents Rarely Perform Stethoscope Hygiene

TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stethoscope hygiene is rarely performed by trainee physicians, according to a research letter published online April 2 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Hx of Depression Tied to Higher Risk of Gestational Diabetes

TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are more likely to have a history of depression, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing.

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Exercise May Improve Neurocognition in Schizophrenia

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise might boost neurocognitive function in people with schizophrenia, according to a small study published online March 23 in the Schizophrenia Bulletin.

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Three-Quarters of Children With ADHD Take Meds

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most children with special health care needs (CSHCN) with current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receive medication treatment or behavioral therapy, according to a study published online March 31 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Article Highlights Legal Issues Linked to Physician Extenders

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of physician extenders (PEs; mainly physician assistants and nurse practitioners) may bring added legal risks to a practice, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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HIV Can Damage Brain Early in Course of Infection

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the early stages of infection, HIV can spread to and develop in the central nervous systems of some patients, according to a study published in the March issue of PLOS Pathogens.

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Key Disordered Eating Info Not Reaching Overweight Youth

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eating disorder education needs to reach overweight youth, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Patients May Be Modifying Meds Due to Trouble Swallowing

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients experience difficulties swallowing and modify medication dosage forms, without necessarily consulting health professionals, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

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Most Childhood CA Survivors Battle Chronic Conditions

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 70 percent of adults who survived cancer in childhood have a mild or moderate chronic condition, and nearly one-third have a severe, disabling, or life-threatening condition, according to a new study published in the April issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Legal Issues of Removing Patient From Practice Explored

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The legal and ethical responsibilities of removing a patient from practice are discussed in an article published March 16 in Medical Economics.

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Plasma B12 Levels Tied to Anorexia Nervosa Severity

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with anorexia nervosa, plasma levels of vitamin B12 might be an early marker of liver dysfunction and are possibly related to more severe psychopathological aspects, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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