April 2015 Briefing - Neurology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for April 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Investigational MenB Vaccine Can Protect Individuals in Outbreak

THURSDAY, April 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An investigational serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine seems to have protected vaccinated individuals from the disease during an outbreak, according to a study published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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Physician Compensation Up for Most Specialties

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician compensation has gone up for almost all specialties, according to a 2015 report published by Medscape.

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Worse Working Memory in Women Versus Men Post Mild TBI

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research from Taiwan uncovers more evidence that women may have a more difficult time recovering their memory after concussions. The study appears online April 28 in Radiology.

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Motion-Tracking MRI May Help ID Stroke Risk in A-Fib

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Motion-tracking magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the heart can help identify people with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are at high risk for stroke, a new study indicates. The study also calls into question the mechanism linking AF with higher stroke risk, says a team reporting the findings online April 27 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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AAP Advises Doctors on How to Identify Child Abuse

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has just released new guidance to help primary care doctors recognize the signs of child abuse. The clinical report was published online April 27 in Pediatrics.

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CDC: Surveillance System Can Help Reduce Health Care Injuries

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A surveillance system for health care facilities can be used to identify and help reduce the number of preventable injuries among health care personnel, according to research published in the April 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Cost of Multiple Sclerosis Rx Soaring, Even for Older Meds

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of multiple sclerosis (MS) medications in the United States is rising five to seven times faster than the normal rate of drug inflation, according to a study published online April 24 in Neurology.

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Fine Particulate Air Pollution Linked to Changes in Brain

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution may be linked to subtle changes in the brain that could lead to cognitive impairment, a new study suggests. The report was published online April 23 in Stroke.

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Over Half of Middle-Age, Older Americans Take Daily Aspirin

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Slightly more than half of middle-aged adults and seniors in the United States take aspirin daily, with most taking it for primary prevention, according to survey findings published in the May issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Challenging Jobs Could Protect in Frontotemporal Dementia

FRIDAY, April 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a challenging job may help people live longer after developing frontotemporal dementia, according to a small study published online April 22 in Neurology.

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Concomitant Metformin, GERD Meds Up Vitamin B12 Depletion

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Concomitant use of metformin and histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors has the potential to induce vitamin B12 depletion and neuropathy, according to research published in the April issue of Clinical Diabetes.

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EHR Data Mining Helps With Quality Improvement

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) are a valuable source of data that can be mined to help practices with quality improvement performance, according to a study published in Medical Economics.

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More Reassurance Against MMR-Autism Link

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yet another study finds no evidence that the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine raises the risk of autism -- even among children who are at increased genetic risk. The latest research was reported in the April 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on child health.

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Sucrose Intake Linked to Higher Activity in Left Hippocampus

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sucrose, but not aspartame, consumption is associated with higher activity in the left hippocampus and reduced stress-induced cortisol, according to a study published online April 16 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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EHR Decision Support Ups Radiologic Test Appropriateness

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized clinical decision-support (CCDS) capabilities of electronic health records may improve appropriate use of diagnostic radiologic test ordering and reduce test use, according to a review published in the April 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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FDA: Counterfeit Botox Found in the United States

MONDAY, April 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Counterfeit Botox may have been distributed to doctors' offices and medical clinics across the United States, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

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Guidance Offered for Managing Conflict With Patients

MONDAY, April 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Good communication is key to managing conflict with patients, according to an article published April 1 in Medical Economics.

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Higher Altitude Linked With Lower Rates of ADHD

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of higher altitude may reduce the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests. The research was published online March 25 in the Journal of Attention Disorders.

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CDC Details Mosquito-Borne Virus-Linked Death in Tennessee

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have characterized a La Crosse virus isolate from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis-associated complications in eastern Tennessee in 2012.

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Suboptimal Prescribing Attitudes Could Signal Personal Distress

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in personal distress may be more likely to have suboptimal attitudes about self-prescribing and personal responsibility for reporting impaired colleagues, according to a study published in the April issue of Academic Medicine.

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FDA: Generic Copaxone Approved for Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The first U.S. generic version of Copaxone (glatiramer acetate injection) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat multiple sclerosis.

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More Evidence Implicates Inflammation in Lyme Neuro Dz

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Anti-inflammatories may help prevent many neuropathologic effects of Lyme neuroborreliosis, according to an experimental study published online April 16 in The American Journal of Pathology.

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Snoring, Sleep Apnea Linked to Dementia, but CPAP Helps

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may be more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at younger ages than those without SDB, a new study suggests. The report was published online April 15 in Neurology.

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Ethical Implications for Looking Up Applicants on Facebook

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Looking up students on Facebook and other social networking sites (SNS) is associated with ethical concerns, according to a perspective piece published in the March issue of the Journal of Graduate Medical Education.

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Medicare Spending Down in Year One of Pioneer ACO

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare spending is down in year one of the Pioneer accountable care organization (ACO) program, according to a study published online April 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AMA Announces End of Sustainable Growth Rate Formula

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recently adopted legislation has repealed the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Response to Parental Concerns of Autism Found Lacking

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The behavior of health care providers is likely a very important factor in delayed autism identification, according to new research published online April 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Depression, Diabetes Both Tied to Increased Dementia Risk

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and diabetes both appear to significantly raise the risk of dementia, according to new research. The findings were published online April 15 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Arginine Implicated in Experimental Alzheimer's Research

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An immune system disorder may play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, research in mice suggests. The study was published in the April 15 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Anticoagulation Both Over- and Under-Prescribed in A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As many as one-quarter of people with atrial fibrillation who have a low risk of stroke are prescribed anticoagulation unnecessarily, a new study contends. The findings were published in a research letter online April 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Survey Looks at Patient Attitudes Regarding Informed Consent

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. adults would prefer to be asked for permission to participate in studies assessing usual medical practices, according to a study published online April 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Pharmacist Support Boosts Anticoagulation Adherence

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The intervention of a local pharmacist could help improve adherence to newer anticoagulants, according to research published in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Security Breaches of Health Records Up Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breaches in data security exposed more than 29 million health records to potential criminal misuse between 2010 and 2013, according to a new study. Security breaches involving hacking have nearly doubled in recent years, rising to 8.7 percent in 2013 compared with 4.7 percent in 2010, according to the study, published as a research letter in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Placebo Response May Depend on Individual DNA

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The strength of the placebo effect may depend on particular DNA, according to a report published online April 13 in Trends in Molecular Medicine.

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Exercise Cuts Pain Interference From Diabetic Neuropathy

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise may help reduce perceived pain interference resulting from diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), according to a brief research report published online March 20 in Pain Medicine.

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Children With Neuro Disorders Need Flu Vaccine, May Not Get It

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children with neurological disorders such as epilepsy or cerebral palsy are at increased risk for complications from the flu, but are no more likely to receive a flu vaccine than other children are, a new U.S. study shows. The study, published online March 30 in Vaccine, was conducted with researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Medical Debt Burden Higher in Texas, Florida

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Significantly more adults in Florida and Texas struggle to pay medical bills or pay off medical debt over time compared with residents of New York and California, according to a new Commonwealth Fund report released Friday.

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Many Doctors Haven't Started Dealing With ICD-10 Revision

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians have barely begun to deal with issues relating to documentation associated with the transition to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Art Program Hones Med Students' Visual Observation Skills

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An innovative interdisciplinary program, Art Rounds, is effective for improving medical and nursing students' physical observation skills, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Nursing Education.

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Restless Leg Syndrome Common in Ankylosing Spondylitis

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is common in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), according to a study published recently in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Overweight/Obesity Linked to Reduced Risk of Dementia

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study of nearly two million people suggests that those who are overweight or obese in middle age may be less likely to develop dementia than their normal-weight and underweight peers. The report was published online April 9 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Migraine Medication Linked to Eating Disorders in Teens

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Topiramate (Topamax) used for migraine headaches has been linked to increased odds of eating disorders in some teens. The report was published online April 6 in Pediatrics.

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Higher Risk of Suicide Seen in Stroke Survivors

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients are at significantly increased risk of suicide, especially during the first two years after the stroke, according to a new study published online April 1 in Neurology.

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Pharmacists Raise Concerns for Patient Access to Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all pharmacists have experienced upswings in the acquisition costs of generic drugs, with price spikes reported to be worse since 2013, according to a report published by the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA).

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Dimethyl Fumarate Linked to Development of PML

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An active ingredient in some psoriasis and multiple sclerosis medications, dimethyl fumarate, has been linked to two cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), according to two letters published in the April 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mindfulness Program Beneficial for Chronic Pain

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A mindfulness program appears to be beneficial for patients with chronic pain, according to a study published in the April issue of Pain Medicine.

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Limited Time Available to Review Sunshine Act Data

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have only 45 days to review and dispute reports regarding their financial ties to drug and medical device manufacturers reported under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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One Extra Stroke Risk Factor Ups Risk in Nonvalvular A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of one additional stroke risk factor is associated with a significant increase in event rates among nonanticoagulated low-risk patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (CHA2DS2-VASc = 0 [male], 1 [female]), according to a study published in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Med Students, Residents Rarely Perform Stethoscope Hygiene

TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stethoscope hygiene is rarely performed by trainee physicians, according to a research letter published online April 2 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Targeted Body Temp Mgmt Post Cardiac Arrest May Benefit Brain

MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Targeted body temperature management after cardiac arrest might help prevent or lessen brain damage, according to a study published online April 6 in JAMA Neurology.

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Exercise May Improve Neurocognition in Schizophrenia

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise might boost neurocognitive function in people with schizophrenia, according to a small study published online March 23 in the Schizophrenia Bulletin.

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Three-Quarters of Children With ADHD Take Meds

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most children with special health care needs (CSHCN) with current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receive medication treatment or behavioral therapy, according to a study published online March 31 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Article Highlights Legal Issues Linked to Physician Extenders

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The use of physician extenders (PEs; mainly physician assistants and nurse practitioners) may bring added legal risks to a practice, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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HIV Can Damage Brain Early in Course of Infection

FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the early stages of infection, HIV can spread to and develop in the central nervous systems of some patients, according to a study published in the March issue of PLOS Pathogens.

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ER Visits for Ischemic Stroke, TIA Down Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer people are being treated in U.S. emergency departments for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, which experts read as a sign that current stroke prevention methods are working. Such visits declined 35 percent for adults 18 and older, and 51 percent for those 55 to 74, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Most Childhood CA Survivors Battle Chronic Conditions

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 70 percent of adults who survived cancer in childhood have a mild or moderate chronic condition, and nearly one-third have a severe, disabling, or life-threatening condition, according to a new study published in the April issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Patients May Be Modifying Meds Due to Trouble Swallowing

THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients experience difficulties swallowing and modify medication dosage forms, without necessarily consulting health professionals, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

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Legal Issues of Removing Patient From Practice Explored

WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The legal and ethical responsibilities of removing a patient from practice are discussed in an article published March 16 in Medical Economics.

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