Education That
Engages You

Available on our partner site, BoardVitals, this question bank is used more than any other child psychiatry exam prep source. Designed to help you prepare for the ABPN Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) certification or recertification exam, topics include anxiety, developmental, eating, elimination, mood, personality, psychotic, substance use disorders and much more.

Learn While You Earn

Earn up to 50.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credit(s)TM  and 50 ABPN MOC credits, including hard to find self-assessment (SA) credits, quickly and easily with just one activity.

Detailed Questions
& Explanations

Test your knowledge by answering more than 900 child psychiatry questions mapped to the ABPM CAP exam. Then review detailed rationales for every question and correct your answers as you go to receive credit.


Leading Faculty

Developed by top faculty and practicing clinicians, BoardVitals helps thousands of doctors, advanced practice nurses, and other health professionals prepare for board certification exams and complete their CME/CE requirements. BoardVitals is trusted by leading medical and nursing institutions including Harvard, Yale, Mt. Sinai, and Duke.

Convenient Access

Whether testing from your iPad in the hospital between cases, or at home on your couch, you have twenty-four hours a day access for 3 months.


ClinicIan Feedback:

This has been hands down the easiest way to earn Psych CME hours. I prepared for my exams while knocking out the hours requirement. Great qbank!

S. Paul, MD, Child and Adolescent Psych, Florida


Child Psychiatry Sample Questions:

Question 1

A child witnesses an explosion which severely injures people around him. Four months later, the child is still experiencing nightmares, flashbacks, and avoids situations that remind him of the event. The most likely diagnosis is:

A) Adjustment disorder with depressed mood
B) Acute stress disorder
C) Normal adjustment reaction
D) Acute post-traumatic stress disorder
E) Chronic post-traumatic stress disorder

Answer
E) Chronic post-traumatic stress disorder


Explanation
Correct: (E) Chronic post-traumatic stress disorder. Explanation: Acute distress disorder is the diagnosis if post-traumatic symptoms are less than 1 month old. Acute post-traumatic stress disorder is diagnosed if the symptoms are between 1-3 months old. Anything longer than 3 months, as in this question, is considered chronic PTSD. Questions about the length of symptoms and diagnosis are easy material for making questions related to PTSD.

Reference
AACAP Practice Parameters, http://download.journals.elsevierhealth.com/pdfs/journals/0890-8567/PIIS0890856710000821.pdf


Question 2

Which of the following statements is correct regarding guanfacine?

A) Guanfacine is a less selective alpha-adrenergic compound than clonidine.
B) Guanfacine is associated with more sedation and shorter duration of action than clonidine.
C) Guanfacine is associated with clinically significant increases in pulse rate and blood pressure.
D) School-age children with ADHD and comorbid tics disorder treated with guanfacine show reduced both tics and ADHD.
E) Anecdotal evidence suggests that guanfacine has no impact on cognitive deficits in ADHD.

Answer
D) School-age children with ADHD and comorbid tics disorder treated with guanfacine show reduced both tics and ADHD.


Explanation
Correct: (D) School-age children with ADHD and comorbid tics disorder treated with guanfacine show reduced both tics and ADHD. Explanation: The reduction in tics and ADHD is associated with a guanfacine at 0.5mg bid to 1mg tid. A. FALSE: Guanfacine is a more selective alpha-adrenergic compound than clonidine. B. FALSE: Guanfacine is associated with less sedation and longer duration of action than clonidine. C. FALSE: Guanfacine is associated with minor, clinically insignificant bradycardia and hypotension. E. FALSE: Anecdotal evidence suggests that guanfacine may be useful in improving cognitive defects associated with ADHD.

Reference
Stern TA, et al. Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry. Maryland Heights, MO: Mosby. 2008.

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