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AAPA releases 2017 salary survey results

The national median salary of a PA in 2017 is $102,000, and this figure is even higher for PAs who practice in states that have granted PAs more autonomy. These are among the findings of the 2017 AAPA Salary Report (AAPA membership or purchase required to access). A few additional highlights of the report include:

  • PAs earn a median base salary of $106,594 in states that have adopted full prescriptive authority compared with $103,879 in states that haven't.
  • PAs earn a median base salary of $107,150 in states that allow the physician cosignature requirement to be determined at the practice level compared with $104,847 in those that don't.
  • As of the report's publication date, 7 states have adopted all 6 of the AAPA's key elements of modern PA practice, and more than 30 states have adopted at least 4. Just a decade ago, not a single state had adopted any of these regulation changes.

Source: AAPA / Forbes

Netherlands PAs granted more practice autonomy

After a 5-year trial, the Dutch Parliament and Senate passed legislation that will allow PAs and NPs full independence to diagnose, initiate treatment, and perform select medical procedures. Among the tasks they'll now be able to perform are catheterizations, surgical procedures, injections, endoscopies, and more. PAs' exact scope of work will be determined at the practice level, and the amendment will take effect on January 1, 2018. About 1,000 PAs currently work in the Netherlands and have been part of the healthcare system since 2001. According to the Dutch Association of Physician Assistants, "The introduction of PAs has resulted in both better continuity and higher quality of medical care and has improved efficiency and productivity in prehospital and hospital care."

Source: Dutch Association of Physician Assistants

78% of PAs will consider NCCPA's PANRE alternative

In our previous edition of Buzz, we shared some impactful news for PAs: the NCCPA plans to launch an alternative to the PANRE in early 2018. (If you missed it, read more details plus several initial responses from your colleagues via a post on NCCPA's Facebook page here.) We asked you to tell us whether you're in favor of the pilot program. Here's how more than 300 PAs responded to our poll.

Are you in favor of the NCCPA's pilot program?

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6 ways hospital EDs benefit from PAs

PAs are helping EDs "reach new levels of clinical and financial success," according to this article in Fierce Healthcare written by NCCPA President and CEO Dawn Morton-Rias, EdD, PA-C. Morton-Rias shares a few such ways the profession contributes, including:

  • Driving down costs. Median compensation for PAs in emergency medicine is $115,00 compared with $400,000 for ED physicians. Hiring PAs is a cost-effective way to increase clinical bandwidth, particularly in rural or small hospitals with low budgets.
  • Treating high acuity patients. PAs can help expedite care for patients requiring immediate attention, assisting with everything from spinal taps to advanced life support.
  • Streamlining processes. One hospital that appointed PAs to triage ED patients cut the rate of patients who left without being seen by a whopping 80% while also reducing the wait time to be seen by about 50%.

Source: Fierce Healthcare


FROM THE HAYMARKET MEDICAL NETWORK
New diabetes monitoring system eliminates fingersticks

The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved a novel continuous glucose monitoring system for adults with diabetes that eliminates the need for fingersticks. The system, called the FreeStyle® Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, can be worn continuously for up to 10 days and eliminates the need for daily calibrations. The device, which requires a small sensor wire to be inserted in the back of the upper arm, allows patients to assess their glucose levels, including instances of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, by waving a mobile reader above the wire. Approved for individuals ages 18 years and older, it's expected to be available for prescription by the end of 2017.

Source: Endocrinology Advisor





Compiled by Traci DeVito, myCME Managing Editor

To suggest a topic for Buzz or to submit comments, please e-mail editor.myCME@haymarketmedical.com.

This Week's CME Picks for PAs
This Week's Featured Products for PAs

Self-Assessment CME: Save 15% With Code "PA15Oct"
20.00 AAPA Category 1 CME Self-Assessment Credits

Save 15% now through 10/24 on select Self-Assessment courses on myCME. Topics include Family Medicine, Surgery, Internal Medicine, and Emergency Medicine.

Rutgers PANCE/PANRE Review with 90 Days' Exam Master Access
28.50 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits

A comprehensive online board review course which provides the framework for the entire NCCPA blueprint. Plus, gain access to 2500 board-style questions and 2 full-length practice exams with 300 questions each with Exam Master.

View All Courses

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