Better Information, Smarter Medicine



Repeal and replace: Where clinicians stand on the health law almost formerly known as ACA

The Affordable Care Act has been on thin ice lately, to say the least. While the law's ultimate fate remains unknown (as of Buzz press time), some clinicians and clinician groups have made it pretty clear how they feel about its potential repeal. Here are a few noteworthy highlights.

First, the American College of Physicians sent a letter to Congress urging them not to dismantle the ACA before a replacement is determined to avoid "massive losses of coverage and consumer protections." Meanwhile, a physician weighed in on the KevinMD blog about the 7 challenges Republicans will face in scrapping the law. Removing the insurance mandate is on his list: "If you remove the mandate forcing healthy people to purchase plans, the costs will continue to increase," the author writes. Want more? Check out this gynecologist's perspective on what will happen if the ACA drops contraception coverage.

Source: KevinMD / Rheumatology Advisor / Bustle


The $ outlook for new PAs in 2017

The AAPA released updated salary data for new graduate and early career PAs as part of its 2016 Salary Report—and if you're no longer a newbie, you may enjoy comparing how good (or bad) you had it when you first started out. A few highlights:

  • The median age of new PAs is 28 years old.
  • The average salary for a new PA in 2015 was $85,547—but 1 in 4 wasn't happy with her compensation.
  • 1 in 3 new PAs (36%) received a sign-on bonus from a new employer.
  • New PAs were less likely than seasoned PAs to have received a bonus in 2015 (40% did), and their bonus was smaller (median bonus: $4,000).
  • PAs in practice for <1 year had an average of $130,000 in student loans from undergrad/PA school, $100,000 of which was related to their PA education.

Source: PA Professional

PAs get a promotion this year on best jobs list

PA has been bumped up to #3 on US News & World Report's list of the 100 best jobs to have in 2017 (last year, PA was #6). And they're not the only clinicians to make the list: 10 of the top 12 jobs are in healthcare, with dentists taking first place. Now for bad news: NPs surpassed PAs this year in both the 100 Best Jobs and Best Health Care Jobs categories. Not only did NPs claim the #2 spot on 2017's 100 Best Jobs list, the profession was also bumped from the #5 job in Health Care to #2. US News picked the winners by selecting jobs with the most available job openings, then scoring them from 0 to 5 based on factors such as median salary, employment rate, 10-year growth volume, and more. View the full list here.

Source: US News & World Report

Enough with troubling laws governing PAs!

That's the jist of this commentary from PA Stephen H. Hanson, which piggybacks on the AAPA Task Force's recent proposal that PAs should pursue full practice authority and responsibility (FPAR). In the article, Hanson clears up that FPAR isn't about increasing PA scope of practice—it's about "PAs being responsible for what they do each day," including allowing PAs to regulate their own profession and to be reimbursed directly by insurance. It's also about doing away with meaningless laws that "do nothing to ensure appropriate practice or patient safety." Cohesive teamwork instead "comes from the relationship between a physician and a PA," and that can't be achieved through regulation, Hanson concludes.

Source: Physician's Practice

This Week's Featured Packages for PAs

Surgical Self-Assessment for Physician Assistants
20.00 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME Credits

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New BP guidelines for older adults from ACP/AAFP

The American College of Physicians and the American Academy of Family Physicians issued a joint guideline defining the appropriate systolic blood pressure (SBP) target for adults aged 60 and older with hypertension. The recommendations include:

  • Start treatment in adults aged ≥60 years with SBP ≥150 mmHg to achieve a target of <150 mmHg to reduce the risk of mortality, stroke, and CVD events (strong recommendation, high-quality evidence)
  • Consider initiating or intensifying pharmacologic treatment in adults aged ≥60 years with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack to achieve a target SBP of <140 mmHg to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke (weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence)
  • Consider initiating or intensifying pharmacologic treatment in some adults aged ≥60 years at high CVD risk, based on individualized assessment, to achieve a target SBP of <140 mmHg to reduce the risk of stroke or CVD events (weak recommendation, low-quality evidence)

Source: MPR





Compiled by Traci DeVito, myCME Managing Editor

To suggest a topic for Buzz or to submit comments, please e-mail editor.myCME@haymarketmedical.com.

This Week's CME Picks for PAs
This Week's Featured Packages for PAs

Surgical Self-Assessment for Physician Assistants
20.00 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME Credits

Test your knowledge and competence in surgical care.

Rutgers PANCE/PANRE Review Course
28.50 AAPA Category 1 CME Credits

Earn 28.50 AAPA credits with this 5-module review course.

View All Courses
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