Better Information, Smarter Medicine



PA finishes 2nd in Boston Marathon's masters division

Kate Landau (pictured above) is a 40-year-old PA in vascular surgery and a single mom—and this past Monday, she added a new accomplishment to the list: Boston Marathon medalist. Landau finished the race in 2 hours, 40 minutes, 2 seconds, which earned her second place in the women's masters division (40 years and older) and 21st place among all female runners. Her career hasn't always come easy: at age 22, Landau stopped running altogether due to an eating disorder. But she recently returned to the sport, 15 years later, with a vengeance: she won the May 2016 Tacoma City Marathon and the October 2016 Portland Marathon, setting record times at both races.

Source: The Olympian

Controversy ensues over vetoed West Virginia PA legislation

In a move that has generated controversy among PAs, the AAPA, and NCCPA, the governor of West Virginia recently struck down a bill that would have allowed PAs in the state to:

  • Work with "collaborating" rather than "supervising" physicians
  • Prescribe up to 30 days of Schedule III medications (up from 72 hours)
  • Authorize various medical forms, such as death certificates
  • Renew licensure without having current NCCPA certification

According to the governor's veto letter, the decision was made to "ensure that patients continue to receive treatment by health care providers who are operating with current clinical knowledge" by maintaining NCCPA recertification. However, the AAPA and the bill's sponsor, State Senator Tom Takubo, have posited that an NCCPA lobbyist with a connection to the governor is behind the bill's veto and that NCCPA opposed the bill for financial reasons. A statement from the NCCPA defends the move, noting that "high certification standards assure patients they are being cared for by qualified PAs who keep up with new medical advances and retain enough core knowledge to pass a recertification exam." It contains no mention of lobbying.

Source: AAPA / NCCPA / WV Metro News

Bill expanding role of PAs in mental health passes in Arkansas

Despite the veto on the West Virginia PA bill, Arkansas passed a law giving PAs more authority to provide mental health care. Under the law, PAs who are licensed by the Arkansas State Medical Board and meet certain criteria will be able to examine, assess, and, if needed, admit involuntary individuals who are experiencing a mental or behavioral health crisis. The bill also includes a comprehensive Behavioral Health Crisis Intervention Protocol Act, which establishes procedures for mental health professionals to follow when managing individuals who pose a threat to themselves or others.

Source: Arkansas State Legislature

Nearly 50% of PAs will get a raise in 2017

In last week's Buzz, we shared that PA took the #7 spot on Glassdoor's third annual 25 Highest Paying Jobs in America list. Then we asked readers to tell us whether they think they'll get a pay raise this year. Check out the results below.

Poll results: Do you expect to receive a raise sometime this year?

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FROM THE HAYMARKET MEDICAL NETWORK
USPSTF changes mind about prostate cancer screening

Screening for prostate cancer should be conducted on an individualized basis in men between ages 55 and 69 years, according to a draft recommendation released by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). This change updates the 2012 USPSTF recommendation, which stated that the benefits of screening did not outweigh the harms enough to recommend routine screening. Why the change? Since 2012, the USPSTF gathered additional evidence suggesting men 55 to 69 years old may experience a small net benefit from screening. In particular, one study found that PSA screening prevents 1 to 2 men from dying of prostate cancer for every 1,000 men screened. However, since the balance of benefits and risks remains close, the decision to undergo screening should be an individual choice.

Source: The Clinical Advisor


More medical news from the Haymarket Medical Network


The Buzz will be on vacation next Sunday, 4/30. See you in May!




Compiled by Traci DeVito, myCME Managing Editor

To suggest a topic for Buzz or to submit comments, please e-mail editor.myCME@haymarketmedical.com.

This Week's CME Picks for PAs
This Week's Featured Products for PAs

Debridement Training: Principles & Practice
4.00 CME Credits

A comprehensive course in the art and science of wound debridement. Review traditional methods as well as cutting edge debridement technologies.

Internal Medicine Self-Assessment for PAs
20.00 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME Credits

This course guides physician assistants through the full spectrum of internal medicine, from preventive health to managing complex illness in adult patients.

View All Courses

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