People With Type 2 Diabetes Less Able to Recover From Stress

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Stress can cause significant emotional disturbance and result in a host of health-related effects, including poor sleep, depression, and more. According to results of a new study, one group of patients may be particularly prone to stress and less able to combat it: those with type 2 diabetes.

Given that experts already know diabetes increases the risk of serious conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke, this new evidence may be an important key in learning how the disease may cause biological changes—and what those changes are. And once those biological changes are identified, researchers may be able to develop treatments that combat them. Here’s what you need to know:

  • During the study of 420 adults between the ages of 50 and 75 years, individuals with diabetes were not as able to bring their blood pressure, heart rate, and cholesterol levels back to normal after completing a stressful test compared to those without the disease.
  • Participants with type 2 diabetes had elevated levels of cortisol in their blood as well as higher levels of IL-6, a protein involved in the immune response. Possession of both these factors may cause a strain on the body.
  • While the study shows a link between the biological processes of stress and type 2 diabetes, it does not demonstrate or suggest that stress is a cause or result of the disease. Rather, it highlights the potential for treatments that can simultaneously target psychological and physical aspects to provide optimal treatment—and less stressed patients.

People With Type 2 Diabetes Less Able to Recover From Stress
People With Type 2 Diabetes Less Able to Recover From Stress
(Medical Xpress)—People with type 2 diabetes are physically less able to recover from stress, finds a study by scientists at UCL and the University of Zurich, funded by the British Heart Foundation. The research study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, compared 420 ...
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