Women Get Year's Worth of Birth Control Under New Oregon Law

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Women Get Year's Worth of Birth Control Under New Oregon Law
Women Get Year's Worth of Birth Control Under New Oregon Law

(HealthDay News) -- A first-of-a-kind insurance law that allows women to obtain a year's worth of birth control at a time will take effect in Oregon on Jan. 1.

Supporters say that no longer limiting women to 30- or 90-day supplies will reduce unintended pregnancies and help women by reducing the number of trips they have to make to pharmacies, the Associated Press reported.

When she signed the legislation Thursday, Gov. Kate Brown said it "has a simple premise that I whole-heartedly believe in: increase access and decrease barriers." The measure had an easy journey through the Legislature and is part of a push by both Democrats and Republicans to improve access to birth control in the state. They are also considering a popular proposal to allow pharmacists to write birth control prescriptions for women who pass a self-administered risk-screening assessment, the AP reported.

Opponents of the new law claim it will increase health care costs for employers and insurers.

Health Highlights: June 12, 2015

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