Thunderstorms Can Trigger Asthma Attacks

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Thunderstorms Can Trigger Asthma Attacks
Thunderstorms Can Trigger Asthma Attacks

TUESDAY, May 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Thunderstorms can trigger asthma outbreaks, according to a study published online April 13 in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.

For example, a 2016 thunderstorm asthma outbreak in Australia occurred when high grass pollen concentrations were dispersed by strong winds. This resulted in multiple deaths and a surge of people seeking medical help for breathing problems.

The authors of the new study explained that rainfall and high humidity rupture pollen particles. Thunderstorm electrical activity further fragments the particles. And strong winds can spread pollen ahead of the storm. A combination of several of these factors can lead to asthma outbreaks.

"Thunderstorm asthma is a very complex phenomenon and involves interactions of allergens like grass pollens, thunderstorms, and susceptible groups of people," lead author Andrew Grundstein, Ph.D., a professor of geography at the University of Georgia in Athens, said in a university news release. "Our study may help anticipate significant thunderstorms by employing a technique that helps identify wind magnitudes commonly associated with thunderstorm asthma outbreaks."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


More in Home

Surveillance Frequency Doesn't Cut Mortality in Colorectal Cancer

Surveillance Frequency Doesn't Cut Mortality in Colorectal Cancer

And, intensity of imaging surveillance not linked to time to detection of colorectal cancer recurrence

Procalcitonin Assay Doesn't Cut Antibiotic Use in Lower RTI

Procalcitonin Assay Doesn't Cut Antibiotic Use in Lower ...

Provision of assay doesn't result in less antibiotic use for suspected lower respiratory tract infection

Preventing Child Maltreatment Not Yet Feasible in Primary Care

Preventing Child Maltreatment Not Yet Feasible in Primary ...

USPSTF says evidence inadequate for primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »