Surgical Glue Reinforcement OK for Lap Sleeve Gastrectomy

This article originally appeared here.
Share this content:
Surgical Glue Reinforcement OK for Lap Sleeve Gastrectomy
Surgical Glue Reinforcement OK for Lap Sleeve Gastrectomy

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical glue is safe and cost-effective, compared to standard stapling, during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Gregoire Mercier, M.D., Ph.D., from CHU de Montpellier in France, and colleagues compared clinical and economic outcomes in consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (2011 to 2012) who received standard stapling (99 patients; group 1) or surgical glue reinforcement (94 patients; group 2).

The researchers found that the duration of intervention was significantly shorter in group 2 (68 versus 82 minutes; P = 0.001). Complications were not significantly different between the groups, although leaks in group 1 were more severe. Group 2 had a reduced initial length of stay (4.8 versus 5.2 days; P = 0.01), as well as fewer six-month readmissions and shorter total length of stay (5.5 versus 6.1 days; P = .003). Initial inpatient cost was significantly reduced with surgical glue (€5,488 versus €6,152; P = 0.005), as was six-month total inpatient cost, which included readmissions (€6,006 versus €6,754; P = 0.005).

"Surgical glue might be a safe and cost-effective intervention in laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters




More in Home

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne Virus

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne ...

First documented case of Keystone infection in a human

70 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak

70 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak

Illnesses reported in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and Tennessee

AAFP Still Recommends CRC Screening From Age 50 to 75

AAFP Still Recommends CRC Screening From Age 50 ...

Despite ACS change to start screening from age 45 years, AAFP agrees with USPSTF recommendation

is free, fast, and customized just for you!




Already a member?

Sign In Now »