Soda Tax Cuts Daily Soda, Energy Drink Consumption

Share this content:
Soda Tax Cuts Daily Soda, Energy Drink Consumption
Soda Tax Cuts Daily Soda, Energy Drink Consumption

FRIDAY, April 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A soda tax does influence daily consumption of regular soda, energy drinks, and bottled water, according to a study published online April 12 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Yichen Zhong, from Drexel University in Philadelphia, and colleagues evaluated the immediate impact of the Philadelphia beverage tax on residents' consumption of soda, fruit drinks, energy drinks, and bottled water. Consumption patterns were assessed during a no-tax period (Dec. 6 to 31, 2016) and a tax period (Jan. 15 to Feb. 31, 2017) among 899 respondents in Philadelphia and 878 respondents in three nearby comparison cities.

The researchers found that, compared to the control cities, within the first two months of tax implementation the odds of daily consumption in Philadelphia were lower for regular soda (odds ratio, 0.6) and energy drinks (odds ratio, 0.36), while consumption of bottled water was higher (odds ratio, 1.58). Additionally, the 30-day regular soda consumption frequency was 38 percent lower.

"Early results suggest that the tax influenced daily consumption of regular soda, energy drinks, and bottled water," the authors write. "Future studies are needed to evaluate longer-term impact of the tax on sugared beverage consumption and substitutions."

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Share this content:

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »

Drug Lookup

Browse drugs by: BrandGenericDisease

Trending Activities

All Professions



Sign up for myCME e-newsletters


More in Home

CDC: Birth Rate for 10- to-14-Year-Olds at Record Low in 2016

CDC: Birth Rate for 10- to-14-Year-Olds at Record ...

Reduction in birth rates for all race and Hispanic origin groups; largest decline in non-Hispanic blacks

Lonafarnib May Lower Mortality in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria

Lonafarnib May Lower Mortality in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria

Lower mortality seen with lonafarnib monotherapy after 2.2 years compared with no treatment

About 40 Percent of Men Report Experiencing Weight Stigma

About 40 Percent of Men Report Experiencing Weight ...

Experience of weight stigma associated with increased odds of underweight or obesity

is free, fast, and customized just for you!

Already a member?

Sign In Now »