September 2015 Briefing - Psychiatry

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for September 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Adjuvant Aripiprazole Beneficial in Tx-Resistant Depression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adjuvant aripiprazole is associated with achievement of remission among older adults with treatment-resistant depression, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in The Lancet.

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Negative Spiritual Belief Linked to Worse Health Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Any degree of negative spiritual belief is associated with worse health outcomes, regardless of positive spiritual beliefs, according to a study published in the Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health.

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Eudaimonic Well-Being Tied to Ovarian Tumor Neuroeffector

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eudaimonic well-being is associated with lower tumor norepinephrine (NE) in women with epithelial ovarian cancer, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Exercise May Lower Risk of Suicide for Bullied Teens

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise may lower bullied teens' risk of suicide, researchers report. The study was published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Subtypes of Delirium Linked to Shorter Survival in Terminally Ill

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For terminally ill patients, hypoactive and mixed subtypes of delirium are associated with shorter survival periods, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

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Health Insurance Deductibles Rising Faster Than Wages

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health insurance deductibles have risen more than six times faster than American workers' average wages since 2010, a Kaiser Family Foundation report says.

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SSRIs Recommended As First Treatment Choice for PMDD

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antidepressants are the first treatment choice for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), according to a new research review published in the September issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Practice.

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Combo Drug May Calm Agitation in Alzheimer's Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A drug that combines dextromethorphan with quinidine might offer a safer option for calming the agitation that commonly affects people with Alzheimer's disease, researchers report in the Sept. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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IOM: Most U.S. Patients Will Experience Diagnostic Error

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new report commissioned by the U.S. government contends that most Americans will encounter at least one diagnostic error in their lifetime, sometimes with severe consequences for their physical and mental health.

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Medical Schools Teaching Students About Costs of Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many medical schools are integrating discussions of cost, value, and effectiveness into their curricula, according to Kaiser Health News.

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fMRI May Take Guesswork Out of Schizophrenia Rx

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) might someday help psychiatrists quickly determine which antipsychotic drugs work best for patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, according to research published online Aug. 28 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Atrial Fibrillation Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increased risk of dementia, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Neurology.

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Docs in Productivity Models Likely to Encounter Compensation Caps

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians, especially those working in a productivity model, need to understand compensation caps, which are set at a specific percentile of national pay based on surveys, according to a report in Medical Economics.

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Researchers Find 96 Percent of Deceased NFL Players Had CTE

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The latest data from a brain bank that focuses on traumatic head injury show that 87 of 91 deceased former National Football League (NFL) players tested positive for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

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Proper Diagnosis Is Key in Managing Chronic Migraine

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Effective management of chronic migraine starts with proper diagnosis of this subtype of migraine, according to guidelines published in the September issue of Pain Practice.

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Volunteer Doctors Need to Check Liability Coverage

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who volunteer their medical expertise should consider their legal risks, according to an article published online Sept. 3 in Medical Economics.

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FDA Approves New Drug for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new antipsychotic drug to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in adults has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug, Vraylar (cariprazine), is a capsule taken once a day.

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2012 Office Visits 57% Higher for Women than Men, Ages 1864

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 2012 there were an estimated 301 physician office visits per 100 persons, with higher rates for females and adults aged 65 years and older, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Mid-Morning May Be Best Time for Workday Break

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Choosing preferred activities for a work break and taking a break earlier in the shift are linked to more resource recovery after a break, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

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Paroxetine Deemed Ineffective, Unsafe for Depressed Teens

THURSDAY, Sept. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the first trial reanalyzed under the Restoring Invisible and Abandoned Trials (RIAT) initiative, the results contradict the original research findings that reported paroxetine to be a safe and effective treatment for major depression in adolescents. The new research was published online Sept. 16 in The BMJ.

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Chemoradiation for Glioblastoma Takes Toll on Brain

THURSDAY, Sept. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Radiation and chemotherapy can cause structural changes in the healthy brain tissue of patients with glioblastoma brain tumors, according to a study published in the Aug. 25 issue of Neurology.

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Complex Chronic Diseases Appear to Drive Frequent Admissions

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who are frequently admitted to U.S. academic medical centers are significantly more likely than other patients to have multiple complex chronic conditions, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Women Less Likely to Be Full Professors Than Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In academic medicine, women are less likely to be full professors than men and have less startup funding than men, according to two studies published in the Sept. 15 issue of JAMA.

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Exercise Counters Fatigue-Related Mood Decline in Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity counters the negative effect that fatigue can have on positive mood among adults with arthritis, according to a study published in the September issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Misconceptions of Infection, Contagion Surround Psoriasis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Misconceptions of infection and contagion surround psoriasis, which is highly stigmatizing, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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CDC Develops State-Level Chronic Disease Cost Calculator

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A chronic disease cost calculator (CDCC) has been developed to estimate state-level costs, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Low Vitamin D Status Linked to Accelerated Cognitive Decline

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For ethnically diverse older adults, low vitamin D status is associated with accelerated decline in cognitive function, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in JAMA Neurology.

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Longer, Shorter Interpregnancy Interval Tied to Higher ASD Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be higher in children born after interpregnancy intervals of less than two years or greater than six years, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Autism Diagnosis May Be Delayed With Co-Occurring ADHD

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An initial attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis may be associated with delayed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Resveratrol Impacts Central Nervous System Biomarkers

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Resveratrol and its major metabolites penetrate the blood-brain barrier to have central nervous system effects in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Neurology.

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Higher Fish Consumption Linked to Lower Risk of Depression

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more fish may reduce risk of depression, according to a report published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Rates of Alcohol, Tobacco Use Down Among U.S. Teens

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of youth ages 12 to 17 who smoke, drink, or abuse certain drugs is falling, according to 2014 survey data released Thursday by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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For Pharma Reps, Access to Physicians Continuing to Drop

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician access for pharmaceutical representatives is continuing to decline, with access restricted to some degree for more than half of physicians, according to an AccessMonitor survey published by ZS.

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Physician Re-Entry Program Set to Redress Physician Shortage

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An online educational program aims to help physicians get back to work and reduce the nation's physician shortage, according to an article published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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4% Increase in Population of Actively Licensed Physicians

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The total population of actively licensed physicians in the United States and the District of Columbia has increased by 4 percent since 2012, according to a report published in the Journal of Medical Regulation.

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Elevated Liver Enzymes Common in Severe Anorexia Nervosa

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with severe anorexia nervosa (AN), elevated liver enzymes are relatively common and are associated with lower body mass index (BMI) and hypoglycemia, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Management, Treatment of Chronic Disease Up With ACA

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans are getting health insurance as a result of the Affordable Care Act, which may lead to many more people getting diagnosed and treated for chronic conditions, such as diabetes, a new study contends. The findings were published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Accelerated MD Program Doesn't Mar Academic Performance

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An accelerated baccalaureate (BA)/doctor of medicine (MD) program does not impair the academic performance of medical students, according to a study published online July 3 in Academic Medicine.

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ACP Supports Expanded Role of Telemedicine for Health Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Telemedicine can be beneficial, within the framework of an established physician-patient relationship, according to a position paper published online Sept. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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EHR Vendors Not Adhering to Usability Certification Standards

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among electronic health record (EHR) products, there is a lack of adherence to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) standards, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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USPSTF Recommends Depression Screening for Teens

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents, but evidence is inadequate to assess screening tools for younger children. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Sept. 7 by the USPSTF.

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Social Distress ID'd in Minority of Colorectal Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A minority of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors experience social distress (SD), and having multiple long-term conditions is the strongest predictor, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Suggested Response Provided for In-Flight Medical Emergencies

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a review article published online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine, guidance is offered for physicians providing emergency in-flight medical care.

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One-Third of U.S. Children With ADHD Diagnosed Before Age 6

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost a third of U.S. children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were diagnosed before the age of 6, even though there aren't many valid tests to support diagnosis in children that young, according to a report published Sept. 3 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Doctors Can Stand Up for Their Patients, Says Appeals Court

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. appeals court has ruled that medical associations have a legal standing to represent their members and members' patients in cases against health insurance companies, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Higher Midlife BMI Tied to Earlier Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among elderly adults with Alzheimer's disease, those who were overweight at age 50 tended to develop dementia earlier, according to research published online Sept. 1 in Molecular Psychiatry.

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Genetic Tests Could Improve Management of Autism

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A pair of genetic tests, chromosomal microarray analysis and whole-exome sequencing, could help parents and doctors better understand the numerous challenges that a child newly diagnosed with autism might face throughout life. The findings were published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Many Teens With Chronic Illnesses Use Alcohol, Marijuana

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many adolescents with chronic diseases such as asthma and juvenile arthritis have consumed alcohol or smoked marijuana in the last year, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Pediatrics.

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Too Little Sleep Can Quadruple Risk for the Common Cold

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Those who sleep less than six hours a night may be more than four times as likely to catch a cold as those who get more than seven hours of sleep, according to research published in the September issue of SLEEP.

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