September 2015 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for September 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Online Follow-Up Feasible for Most Surgery Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Online postoperative care is preferred over in-person care by a majority of patients who have routine, uncomplicated surgery, according to research published online Sept. 22 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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More Support for High-Fiber, Mediterranean Diet

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Numerous studies have extolled the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet. Now, research suggests the regimen may also increase levels of beneficial short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The findings were published online Sept. 29 in Gut.

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Calcium Supplements May Not Benefit Bone Health

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extra calcium may not protect aging bones after all. The findings appear online in two reviews published online Sept. 29 in The BMJ.

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Abbreviated MRI Protocol Can Exclude Malignancy After Mammo

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An abbreviated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol can exclude malignancy in women with suspicious X-ray mammography screening, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Radiology.

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Negative Spiritual Belief Linked to Worse Health Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Any degree of negative spiritual belief is associated with worse health outcomes, regardless of positive spiritual beliefs, according to a study published in the Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health.

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Biomarkers Help ID Complications in Pregnant Women With Lupus

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blood tests may help identify women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are at high risk for complications during pregnancy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Eudaimonic Well-Being Tied to Ovarian Tumor Neuroeffector

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eudaimonic well-being is associated with lower tumor norepinephrine (NE) in women with epithelial ovarian cancer, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Computer-Aided Mammograms May Not Be Worth the Cost

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Computer-aided detection added to mammography may not improve breast cancer detection, a new study contends. The findings appear online Sept. 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Thermal-Based Laser May Treat Stress Urinary Incontinence

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Noninvasive erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser treatment appears promising for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Legal Cases for Soft-Tissue Fillers Mainly Involve Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Legal cases relating to soft-tissue filler most often involve physicians, frequently relating to a non-physician performing the procedure, according to a research letter published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Exposure to BPA in Pregnancy Tied to Low Birth Weight in Girls

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers with high blood levels of bisphenol A (BPA) early in pregnancy tend to have newborn girls who weigh less than girls born of mothers with low BPA levels, according to a new study published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Removal of sFlt-1 From Blood Aids Preeclampsia

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Selective removal of circulating soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) with an extracorporeal device seems to be safe and effective for treating women with very preterm preeclampsia, according to a pilot study published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Spironolactone Seems Effective for Female Pattern Hair Loss

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Spironolactone may be an effective treatment for female pattern hair loss (FPHL), especially among patients with signs of hyperandrogenism, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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CDC: 10 Percent of U.S. Women Consume Alcohol While Pregnant

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although drinking alcohol during pregnancy poses a risk to the unborn child, one in 10 pregnant women in the United States still consume alcohol, according to research published in the Sept. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Tips Offered for Management of Genetic Conditions in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Management of genetic conditions during pregnancy may require a multidisciplinary approach, according to a Committee Opinion from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CDC Estimates HIV Prevalence in U.S. Adults From '07 to '12

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated prevalence of HIV is 0.39 percent among U.S adults, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the National Health Statistics Reports published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Preoperative Breast MRI Use Increased From 2003 to 2012

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From 2003 to 2102 there was a significant increase in preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) use in women with breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in JAMA Oncology.

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Very Premature Infants Benefit From Later Cord Clamping

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord benefits extremely premature newborns, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of Perinatology.

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Adding Benign Breast Dz to Risk Model May Boost Preventive Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Greater numbers of high-risk women eligible for primary prevention of breast cancer are identified by incorporating benign breast disease (BBD) diagnoses into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk model, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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No Link for Coffee Consumption and Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that drinking coffee doesn't seem to up the odds of atrial fibrillation. The findings were published online Sept. 23 in BMC Medicine.

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Fewer Multiple Embryos With Femara in Unexplained Infertility

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of letrozole (Femara) may reduce a couple's risk of having a pregnancy with multiple embryos -- but it might also slightly lower their chances of a live birth, a new clinical trial suggests. The study was published in the Sept. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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SSRIs Recommended As First Treatment Choice for PMDD

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antidepressants are the first treatment choice for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), according to a new research review published in the September issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Practice.

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Not All Trans Fats Appear to Be Created Equal for Heart Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that not all trans fats are equal, and some might even be beneficial. The findings were published online Sept. 22 in the European Heart Journal.

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Review Links Obesity to Increased Thyroid Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer, according to a review published online Sept. 14 in Obesity Reviews.

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Health Insurance Deductibles Rising Faster Than Wages

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health insurance deductibles have risen more than six times faster than American workers' average wages since 2010, a Kaiser Family Foundation report says.

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ACOG: Encourage Consideration of Contraceptive Implants/IUDs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- All women at risk of unwanted pregnancy should be counseled on all contraceptive options, including long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), according to a Committee Opinion published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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IOM: Most U.S. Patients Will Experience Diagnostic Error

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new report commissioned by the U.S. government contends that most Americans will encounter at least one diagnostic error in their lifetime, sometimes with severe consequences for their physical and mental health.

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Combinations of Pregnancy Complications Predict CVD Death

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Combinations of pregnancy complications can predict high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

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Medical Schools Teaching Students About Costs of Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many medical schools are integrating discussions of cost, value, and effectiveness into their curricula, according to Kaiser Health News.

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USPSTF Urges Doctors to Ask Adults About Tobacco Use

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians ask adults, including pregnant women, about tobacco use and provide interventions to help stop smoking. These findings form the basis of a clinical guideline published online Sept. 22 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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More Than 30 Percent of Adults Are Obese in the United States

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 2014, obesity rates increased in Kansas, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio, and Utah, according to a report released Monday from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Docs in Productivity Models Likely to Encounter Compensation Caps

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians, especially those working in a productivity model, need to understand compensation caps, which are set at a specific percentile of national pay based on surveys, according to a report in Medical Economics.

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Volunteer Doctors Need to Check Liability Coverage

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who volunteer their medical expertise should consider their legal risks, according to an article published online Sept. 3 in Medical Economics.

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2012 Office Visits 57% Higher for Women than Men, Ages 1864

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 2012 there were an estimated 301 physician office visits per 100 persons, with higher rates for females and adults aged 65 years and older, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Mid-Morning May Be Best Time for Workday Break

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Choosing preferred activities for a work break and taking a break earlier in the shift are linked to more resource recovery after a break, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

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PCPs Report Mixed Feelings About Recent Health Care Changes

THURSDAY, Sept. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care providers have mixed feelings about recent changes in health care, according to a study published by the Commonwealth Fund and the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Ipsilateral Breast Event Risk Higher Over Time With DCIS

THURSDAY, Sept. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risks of developing an ipsilateral breast event (IBE) and an invasive IBE increased over time for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were selected on the basis of favorable clinical and pathologic characteristics for surgical excision without radiation, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Women Less Likely to Be Full Professors Than Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In academic medicine, women are less likely to be full professors than men and have less startup funding than men, according to two studies published in the Sept. 15 issue of JAMA.

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CDC Develops State-Level Chronic Disease Cost Calculator

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A chronic disease cost calculator (CDCC) has been developed to estimate state-level costs, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Longer, Shorter Interpregnancy Interval Tied to Higher ASD Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be higher in children born after interpregnancy intervals of less than two years or greater than six years, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Mediterranean Diet With Olive Oil Cuts Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil may reduce the risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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NIH: Benefits for More Intensive Control of Hypertension

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should control hypertension much more aggressively than current guidelines suggest, to best reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in people 50 or older. That's the message behind the potentially game-changing results of a U.S. National Institutes of Health study released Friday.

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Higher Fish Consumption Linked to Lower Risk of Depression

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming more fish may reduce risk of depression, according to a report published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Gaining Weight in Adulthood Linked to Lower Fecundity

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) at age 18 years, weight change since age 18, and weight in adulthood correlate with fecundity, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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For Pharma Reps, Access to Physicians Continuing to Drop

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician access for pharmaceutical representatives is continuing to decline, with access restricted to some degree for more than half of physicians, according to an AccessMonitor survey published by ZS.

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Elevated Liver Enzymes Common in Severe Anorexia Nervosa

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with severe anorexia nervosa (AN), elevated liver enzymes are relatively common and are associated with lower body mass index (BMI) and hypoglycemia, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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Unlicensed Stem Cell Clinics Operating in the United States

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hundreds of clinics across the United States are offering unapproved stem cell treatments for conditions from hair loss to heart failure and Alzheimer's disease, researchers report in the Sept. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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4% Increase in Population of Actively Licensed Physicians

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The total population of actively licensed physicians in the United States and the District of Columbia has increased by 4 percent since 2012, according to a report published in the Journal of Medical Regulation.

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Physician Re-Entry Program Set to Redress Physician Shortage

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An online educational program aims to help physicians get back to work and reduce the nation's physician shortage, according to an article published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Vaginal Mesh Surgery Concerns May Be Overstated

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Only one out of every 30 women who receive a synthetic vaginal mesh sling to treat stress urinary incontinence will suffer a complication that requires a second surgery, according to a decade-long follow-up study of nearly 60,000 Canadian women. The findings were published online Sept. 9 in JAMA Surgery.

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Management, Treatment of Chronic Disease Up With ACA

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans are getting health insurance as a result of the Affordable Care Act, which may lead to many more people getting diagnosed and treated for chronic conditions, such as diabetes, a new study contends. The findings were published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Over Half of U.S. Adults Have Diabetes or Prediabetes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of all American adults have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hysterectomy + Panniculectomy Can Be Safely Performed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Combined hysterectomy and panniculectomy procedures can be performed safely; however, there is an increased likelihood of longer length of stay with combined procedures compared with hysterectomy alone, according to a study published in the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Accelerated MD Program Doesn't Mar Academic Performance

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An accelerated baccalaureate (BA)/doctor of medicine (MD) program does not impair the academic performance of medical students, according to a study published online July 3 in Academic Medicine.

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Behavioral Weight Loss Program Assists Breast Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight/obese survivors of breast cancer, a behavioral weight loss intervention can lead to clinically meaningful weight loss, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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ACP Supports Expanded Role of Telemedicine for Health Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Telemedicine can be beneficial, within the framework of an established physician-patient relationship, according to a position paper published online Sept. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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EHR Vendors Not Adhering to Usability Certification Standards

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among electronic health record (EHR) products, there is a lack of adherence to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) standards, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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USPSTF Recommends Depression Screening for Teens

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents, but evidence is inadequate to assess screening tools for younger children. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Sept. 7 by the USPSTF.

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Herpes Zoster Vaccine Not Cost-Effective in Adults Aged 50 Years

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For adults aged 50 years, herpes zoster (HZ) vaccine does not appear to be cost-effective, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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USPSTF: Evidence Lacking for Iron Deficiency Anemia Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has found that current evidence is insufficient for weighing the benefits and harms of iron deficiency screening and routine iron supplementation in pregnancy. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published online Sept. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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PCOS Linked to Increased Risk of Preterm Delivery for Twins

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis is associated with increased risk of preterm delivery in twin pregnancies, according to a study published in the September issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Review Explores Postpartum Weight-Loss Strategies

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For postpartum women, lifestyle interventions that include a combined diet-and-exercise approach and those that use self-monitoring are associated with greater weight loss, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in Obesity Reviews.

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Birth Asphyxia Tied to Fewer Than 10% of Cerebral Palsy Cases

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cerebral palsy is likely due to multiple prenatal factors, with the contribution of birth defects exceeding that of other major factors, according to a review published in the Sept. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Suggested Response Provided for In-Flight Medical Emergencies

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a review article published online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine, guidance is offered for physicians providing emergency in-flight medical care.

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Sustained Calorie Restriction May Help Prevent Age-Related Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sustained calorie restriction can influence disease risk factors and possible predictors of longevity in healthy, non-obese people, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences.

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Acupuncture Linked to Reduced Blood Pressure in Small Study

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blood pressure levels declined slightly in a small study of patients treated 30 minutes a week with electroacupuncture. The findings were published in the August issue of Medical Acupuncture.

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Early Exposure to Secondhand Smoke May Up A-Fib Risk Later

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke during childhood or while in the womb may increase risk of atrial fibrillation in adulthood, new research suggests. The findings were published online Sept. 1 in Heart Rhythm.

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Breastfeeding Tied to Reduced Risk of MS Relapse Postpartum

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding exclusively for at least two months may help new mothers with multiple sclerosis (MS) lower their risk of relapse, according to research published online Aug. 31 in JAMA Neurology.

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CDC: Smoking Rate Falls to 15.2 Percent in the United States

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. smoking rate continues to decline, with 15.2 percent of adults reporting they're current smokers, down from 16.8 percent in 2014 and 17.8 percent in 2013, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.

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Cervical Pessary Doesn't Reduce Preterm Birth in Twin Pregnancy

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with a twin pregnancy, insertion of a cervical pessary is not associated with a reduction in the rate of spontaneous early preterm birth, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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