September 2015 Briefing - Cardiology

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for September 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

More Support for High-Fiber, Mediterranean Diet

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Numerous studies have extolled the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet. Now, research suggests the regimen may also increase levels of beneficial short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The findings were published online Sept. 29 in Gut.

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Angioedema Induced by New Classes of Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two newer classes of drugs, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) and neprilysin inhibitors, can induce angioedema, according to research published in the October issue of Allergy.

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Negative Spiritual Belief Linked to Worse Health Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Any degree of negative spiritual belief is associated with worse health outcomes, regardless of positive spiritual beliefs, according to a study published in the Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health.

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Long Duration Dual Antiplatelet Treatment Increases Bleeding

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Routine use of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) beyond six months after second generation drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation yields mixed clinical results, according to a review published in the October issue of Cardiovascular Therapeutics.

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Medical Costs Increasing for Smokers Who Develop PAD

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking significantly increases medical costs among patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study suggests. The findings were published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Review: Sweetened Drinks May Affect Cardiovascular Health

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages can seriously damage cardiovascular health, a new review finds. The report was published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Dietary Nitrates Boost Muscle Power in Heart Failure Patients

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Beetroot juice, with its high concentration of nitrates, may help boost muscle strength among heart failure patients, according to a study published recently in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Guideline Developed for Supraventricular Tachycardia

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations have been developed for the management of adult patients with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). The guideline was published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Fidgeting Offers Health Benefits to Sedentary Women

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who sit for long periods of time but are either moderately or very fidgety have a mortality risk similar to that seen in more active women, according to research published online Sept. 23 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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No Link for Coffee Consumption and Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that drinking coffee doesn't seem to up the odds of atrial fibrillation. The findings were published online Sept. 23 in BMC Medicine.

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Orthostatic Hypotension Could Signal Neurological Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Orthostatic hypotension (OH) may be an early warning sign of a serious neurological disease and an increased risk of premature death, according to research published online Sept. 23 in Neurology.

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Not All Trans Fats Appear to Be Created Equal for Heart Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that not all trans fats are equal, and some might even be beneficial. The findings were published online Sept. 22 in the European Heart Journal.

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Health Insurance Deductibles Rising Faster Than Wages

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health insurance deductibles have risen more than six times faster than American workers' average wages since 2010, a Kaiser Family Foundation report says.

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Regular Text Messages Could Help Patients With CHD

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Regular text message reminders can help people with coronary heart disease (CHD) adhere to a healthier lifestyle, according to research published in the Sept. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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IOM: Most U.S. Patients Will Experience Diagnostic Error

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new report commissioned by the U.S. government contends that most Americans will encounter at least one diagnostic error in their lifetime, sometimes with severe consequences for their physical and mental health.

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Medical Schools Teaching Students About Costs of Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many medical schools are integrating discussions of cost, value, and effectiveness into their curricula, according to Kaiser Health News.

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Combinations of Pregnancy Complications Predict CVD Death

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Combinations of pregnancy complications can predict high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

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DNR Orders After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Tied to Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who receive successful resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest, do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders are generally associated with likelihood of favorable neurological survival, according to a study published in the Sept. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sexual Activity Doesn't Seem to Trigger Repeat MI Events

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many myocardial infarction (MI) survivors are concerned that too much physical activity could trigger a repeat event. But after reviewing data collected on 536 heart disease patients between the ages of 30 and 70, researchers found sexual activity requires about the same amount of exertion as climbing two flights of stairs or taking a brisk walk. The research letter was published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Lower Beta-Blocker Dose May Boost Survival After MI

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated with low-dose beta-blockers after myocardial infarction may fare better than those given the standard dose, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Harms From Unnecessary Abx Extend Beyond Resistance

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Use of antibiotics in patients with heart failure exacerbation in the absence of compelling evidence of infection is unnecessary and potentially harmful, according to teachable moment piece published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Low Risk of Stroke From Progression to Carotid Occlusion

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis, the risk of stroke from progression to carotid occlusion is low, according to research published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Neurology.

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More Than 30 Percent of Adults Are Obese in the United States

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 2014, obesity rates increased in Kansas, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio, and Utah, according to a report released Monday from the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Docs in Productivity Models Likely to Encounter Compensation Caps

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians, especially those working in a productivity model, need to understand compensation caps, which are set at a specific percentile of national pay based on surveys, according to a report in Medical Economics.

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Atrial Fibrillation Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increased risk of dementia, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Neurology.

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2012 Office Visits 57% Higher for Women than Men, Ages 1864

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In 2012 there were an estimated 301 physician office visits per 100 persons, with higher rates for females and adults aged 65 years and older, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Mid-Morning May Be Best Time for Workday Break

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Choosing preferred activities for a work break and taking a break earlier in the shift are linked to more resource recovery after a break, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

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Volunteer Doctors Need to Check Liability Coverage

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians who volunteer their medical expertise should consider their legal risks, according to an article published online Sept. 3 in Medical Economics.

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Tai Chi Aids Physical Performance in Chronic Conditions

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tai chi has a favorable effect on physical performance in four chronic conditions, according to a review and meta-analysis published online Sept. 17 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Complex Chronic Diseases Appear to Drive Frequent Admissions

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who are frequently admitted to U.S. academic medical centers are significantly more likely than other patients to have multiple complex chronic conditions, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Women Less Likely to Be Full Professors Than Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In academic medicine, women are less likely to be full professors than men and have less startup funding than men, according to two studies published in the Sept. 15 issue of JAMA.

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Tai Chi Improves BP Control, Quality of Life in Older Adults

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Tai chi is effective in managing several hypertension-related risk factors in older adults, according to a study published in the October issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Risk of Colorectal Polyps Tied to Blood Pressure Medications

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blood pressure medications may raise the risk of colorectal polyps, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

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Beta-Blockers Don't Mar Acute Variceal Bleeding Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding (AVB), being on non-selective beta-blockers (NSBB) is not a negative prognostic factor for short-term survival, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in Hepatology.

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USPSTF Recommendations for Aspirin Use Vary by Age

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that the benefits and harms of low-dose aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer vary by patient age. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Sept. 14 by the USPSTF.

Draft Recommendation Statement
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Low HDL-C, High CRP Ups Mortality for Patients With CAD

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) on statin therapy after undergoing a first percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the risk of all-cause mortality is increased with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC Develops State-Level Chronic Disease Cost Calculator

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A chronic disease cost calculator (CDCC) has been developed to estimate state-level costs, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Anticoagulation Report Has Little Impact in Discharge Summary

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients on warfarin, an anticoagulation report that is embedded in the discharge summary has no impact on clinical outcomes, although it is perceived to improve patient safety, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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NIH: Benefits for More Intensive Control of Hypertension

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should control hypertension much more aggressively than current guidelines suggest, to best reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in people 50 or older. That's the message behind the potentially game-changing results of a U.S. National Institutes of Health study released Friday.

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Exercise Appears Safe, Beneficial for Patients With Pulmonary HTN

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise has a positive effect on several measures of heart function as well as overall quality of life for patients with pulmonary hypertension, according to research published recently in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Gut Microbiome May Play Role in BMI, HDL Cholesterol Levels

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intestinal microbiomes might help determine not only body fat levels, but also blood concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Circulation Research.

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Migraine Frequency, Intensity Linked to Cholesterol Levels

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Migraine frequency and intensity seem to be positively associated with total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, according to a study published in the September issue of Pain Practice.

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For Pharma Reps, Access to Physicians Continuing to Drop

FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician access for pharmaceutical representatives is continuing to decline, with access restricted to some degree for more than half of physicians, according to an AccessMonitor survey published by ZS.

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Short, Intense Workouts Offer CV Benefits for T2DM Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that short bouts of high-intensity exercise could help reverse some early cardiac structure and function changes in patients with type 2 diabetes. The findings were published online Sept. 9 in Diabetologia.

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Modest Predictive Power for HbA1c in Atherosclerotic CVD Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the context of conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has a modest effect on predicted atherosclerotic CVD risk, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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4% Increase in Population of Actively Licensed Physicians

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The total population of actively licensed physicians in the United States and the District of Columbia has increased by 4 percent since 2012, according to a report published in the Journal of Medical Regulation.

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Physician Re-Entry Program Set to Redress Physician Shortage

THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An online educational program aims to help physicians get back to work and reduce the nation's physician shortage, according to an article published by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Management, Treatment of Chronic Disease Up With ACA

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More Americans are getting health insurance as a result of the Affordable Care Act, which may lead to many more people getting diagnosed and treated for chronic conditions, such as diabetes, a new study contends. The findings were published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Post-Op Delirium Diminishes Recovery in Older Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with delirium following major surgery are more likely to have worse outcomes, including lower quality of life, disability, or even death, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in JAMA Surgery.

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ICER: New Cholesterol Drugs Highly Overpriced

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two newly approved medications to treat high cholesterol are extremely overpriced compared to the health benefits they give to patients, a new analysis finds. The drugs in question, Repatha (evolocumab) and Praluent (alirocumab), currently cost more than $14,000 per year, and because millions of Americans have high cholesterol, costs could be overwhelming, according to The New York Times.

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Accelerated MD Program Doesn't Mar Academic Performance

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An accelerated baccalaureate (BA)/doctor of medicine (MD) program does not impair the academic performance of medical students, according to a study published online July 3 in Academic Medicine.

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Over Half of U.S. Adults Have Diabetes or Prediabetes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of all American adults have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Non-O Blood Group Tied to Higher CAD, MI Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having non-O blood group may be an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction, according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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ACP Supports Expanded Role of Telemedicine for Health Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Telemedicine can be beneficial, within the framework of an established physician-patient relationship, according to a position paper published online Sept. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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EHR Vendors Not Adhering to Usability Certification Standards

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Among electronic health record (EHR) products, there is a lack of adherence to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) standards, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CHADS2 Best Predictor of Postoperative Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The CHADS2 atrial fibrillation (AF) risk score is the best predictor of postoperative stroke or death regardless of type of surgery, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Suggested Response Provided for In-Flight Medical Emergencies

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a review article published online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine, guidance is offered for physicians providing emergency in-flight medical care.

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Modest Relation Between HbA1c, Cardiovascular Events

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is not significantly associated with cardiovascular events, regardless of clinical manifestation of vascular disease, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Diabetes Care.

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Sugary Beverage Intake Linked to Triglycerides in Children

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) by children is positively associated with triglyceride concentration, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in the Journal of Nutrition.

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Acupuncture Linked to Reduced Blood Pressure in Small Study

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blood pressure levels declined slightly in a small study of patients treated 30 minutes a week with electroacupuncture. The findings were published in the August issue of Medical Acupuncture.

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Fewer Repeat Hemorrhagic Strokes With Better BP Control

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of intracerebral hemorrhage may be at higher risk for recurrence if their blood pressure (BP) isn't under control, a new study warns. The findings were published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Early Exposure to Secondhand Smoke May Up A-Fib Risk Later

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke during childhood or while in the womb may increase risk of atrial fibrillation in adulthood, new research suggests. The findings were published online Sept. 1 in Heart Rhythm.

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Cardiovascular Risk Up After Knee, Hip Replacement

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have total hip or knee replacement surgery face a greater risk for myocardial infarction (MI) during the first month following the procedure, according to research published online Aug. 31 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Finerenone Linked to Improved UACR in Diabetic Nephropathy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetic nephropathy receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, the addition of finerenone results in improvement in the urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR), according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: Smoking Rate Falls to 15.2 Percent in the United States

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. smoking rate continues to decline, with 15.2 percent of adults reporting they're current smokers, down from 16.8 percent in 2014 and 17.8 percent in 2013, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.

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Resting Heart Rate, HR Variability May Help ID Functional Disability

TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with a higher resting heart rate and lower heart rate variability are less able to care for themselves, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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