Salty Food Intake Tied to Acne Development

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Salty Food Intake Tied to Acne Development
Salty Food Intake Tied to Acne Development

TUESDAY, Dec. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Consuming salty foods may be a significant factor contributing to the development of acne, according to a study published online Dec. 9 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

Mohammad A. El Darouti, M.D., from Cairo University, and colleagues assessed the relationship between the dietary intake of salty and spicy foods and the onset, severity, and duration of acne in 200 patients with acne vulgaris and 200 age- and gender-matched controls. A 24-hour recall method was used as part of the questionnaire.

The researchers found that patients with acne consumed significantly higher daily amounts of sodium chloride compared to the controls (median, 3,367.54 versus 2,271.80 mg; P < 0.001). The amount of sodium chloride in the diet was negatively correlated with the age of onset of acne lesions (P = 0.031). However, there was no correlation between either salty or spicy foods and duration or severity of the disease.

"Consumption of salty foods was significantly higher among patients with acne compared to acne-free subjects, making the consumption of salty food a possible participating factor in the development of acne," the authors write.

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